School of Medicine


Showing 51-62 of 62 Results

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Dieter Schwarz Foundation Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 3) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCoronary Angioplasty; Intramyocardial Stem cell delivery

  • Frank E. Stockdale

    Frank E. Stockdale

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory and clinical research in breast cancer ; Normal and abornal differentiation and growth

  • Han Sun

    Han Sun

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Genetics
    Biostatistician 2, Pediatrics - Endocrinology

    BioHan had been a postdoc with Dr. Steinmetz at the genetics department for five years, working on both cancers and heart diseases, trying to understand the mechanisms linking from variants to disease phenotypes. This led to a few very interesting findings of aberrant splicing regulation, such as splicing-mediated readthrough stabilization (SRS), one more mechanism for oncogene activation in multiple types of cancers, and tissue-specific splicing of a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, suggesting a molecular connection between deficiency in energy-supplying and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    After being a senior computational biologist with Dr. Gloyn, who has been dedicated to the research of type 2 diabetes for decades, Han switched to the field of this multifactorial metabolic disease. It did take some courage to make such a switch at his post-postdoc stage, however, Han has a consistent interest in studying PG&E, which is not pacific gas and electric nearby, but the interaction between phenotype, genotype, and environment. With years of hands-on experience in statistical modeling and the analysis of next-generation sequencing and mass spectrometry data, in addition to a good understanding of disease genetics, cancer biology, and systems biology, Han is highly confident that he will enjoy the adventure and contribute to our understanding of diabetes.

  • Louise Y Sun

    Louise Y Sun

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Louise Sun recently joined the Stanford University School of Medicine as the Chief of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology and Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine. She is an Adjunct Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) in Toronto. Prior to this, she was an Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Epidemiology, Director of Big Data and Health Bioinformatics Research at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and a Clinical Research Chair in Big Data and Cardiovascular Outcomes at the University of Ottawa.

    Dr. Sun received her medical degree from McMaster University. She completed her anesthesiology residency at the University of Ottawa and her Masters of Science in Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, followed by a clinical and research fellowship in cardiac anesthesia at the University of Toronto. She then joined the Division of Cardiac Anesthesiology at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and was cross appointed as an ICES faculty member.

    Dr. Sun’s areas of clinical focus are hemodynamic monitoring and heart failure. Her methodologic areas of focus are the conduct of population-based cohort studies using large healthcare databases; predictive analytics; sex and gender epidemiology; patient engagement; innovative methods for data processing and warehousing; and software and applications development. Her research leverages big data and digital technology to bridge key gaps in the delivery of care and outcomes for patients with heart failure and/or undergoing cardiovascular interventions, zooming in on sex/gender and personalized care. She holds several patents and collaborates with health authorities and policy makers to evaluate and report on models of cardiac healthcare delivery.

    Dr. Sun is active in the scientific community. She sits on a number of US, Canadian and international editorial boards and scientific and grant review committees, and collaborates nationally and internationally on a variety of population health and data science initiatives. Her patient-centered research program aims to improve access to care and outcomes, focusing on personalized risk stratification and long-term, patient-defined outcomes. She has authored over 100 peer-reviewed papers and published in leading clinical journals including JAMA, JAMA Cardiology, JAMA Internal Medicine, Circulation, JACC, Diabetes Care, and Anesthesiology. Her research program has been well funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, and the Ontario Ministry of Health.

  • Katrin J Svensson

    Katrin J Svensson

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular metabolism
    Protein biochemistry
    Cell biology and function
    Animal physiology

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProgram Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing “magic bullets”; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, “non-natural” objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.

  • Ali Bin Syed

    Ali Bin Syed

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    BioDr. Syed is a member of the divisions of Pediatric Radiology and Body MRI and serves as the Director of MRI for Stanford Medicine Children's Health. His clinical interests include MR imaging of pediatric and adult hepatobiliary disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, gynecologic pathology, and congenital heart disease. He is also an active researcher, collaborating with fellow engineers and scientists at Stanford to translate technical innovations in MRI into improved patient care. His recent work focuses on translation of machine learning techniques for rapid, robust MRI in children and adults.

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections