School of Medicine


Showing 11-19 of 19 Results

  • Mickey Trockel

    Mickey Trockel

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioMickey Trockel is the Director of Evidence Based Innovation for the Stanford University School of Medicine WellMD Center. His development of novel measurement tools has led to growing focus on professional fulfillment as a foundational aim of efforts to promote physician well-being. His scholarship also identifies interpersonal interactions at work as a modifiable core determinate of an organizational culture that cultivates wellness.

    Dr. Trockel serves as the chair of the Physician Wellness Academic Consortium Scientific Board, which is a group of academic medical centers working together to improve physician wellbeing. The consortium sites have adopted the physician wellness assessment system Dr. Trockel and his colleagues have developed, which offers longitudinal data for benchmarking and natural experiment based program evaluation. His previous research included focus on college student health, and evaluation of the efficacy of a national evidence based psychotherapy dissemination effort. His more recent scholarship has focused on physician wellbeing. He is particularly interested in developing and demonstrating the efficacy of interventions designed to promote wellbeing by improving social culture determinants of wellbeing across student groups, employee work teams, or larger organizations.

  • Yuri Tsutsumi

    Yuri Tsutsumi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Psychology

  • Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioJason Tucciarone MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor with Stanford School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. As a neuroscientist, he leads a lab interested in biological mechanisms of mental illness and investigating new therapies for mood disorders and addiction. In particular, he is defining new cell types and evolutionary conserved circuits in emotional processing centers of the brain, with the hope of finding new entry points for novel therapeutics. Working with Dr Robert Malenka, he is using optogenetic, chemogenetic, neuroimaging and behavioral approaches in mouse models of addiction to uncover vulnerable brain circuitry in opioid use disorder. Alongside Dr Alan Schatzberg, he is investigating the efficacy of buprenorphine augmentation to IV ketamine infusion at reducing suicidality in treatment resistant depression.

    Clinically, he works collaboratively in the department’s Neuropsychiatry clinic and his clinical focus includes treating patients with diverse and complex presentations at the interface of psychiatry and neurology with particular interest in functional neurological disorders. He sees a small cohort of psychotherapy patients in Individual Psychotherapy Clinic. He also works weekend shifts on Stanford’s inpatient psychiatry units.

    Prior to training in psychiatry at Stanford’s research residency track Jason received his bachelor’s degree in biology and philosophy from Union College. He spent three years as a Post-Baccalaureate IRTA fellow at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke investigating and developing MRI reportable contrast agents to map neuronal connectivity. Following this he entered the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) at the State University of NY Stony Brook University. There he completed a doctoral dissertation in neuroscience under the mentorship Dr. Josh Huang at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. His thesis work employed mouse genetic dissections of excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits with a focus on the circuitry of chandelier inhibitory interneurons in prefrontal cortex.

    In addition to his research and clinical work, Jason is passionate about teaching, mentorship, and resident clinical supervision. He joined a working group early in his clinical residency to restructure trainee’s neuroscience education. He teaches introductory lectures in the neuroscience of addiction, PTSD, psychosis, and mood disorders. He also leads resident group supervision in their introductory psychodynamic psychotherapy clinical experience. He supervises medical students, residents, and clinical fellows in Neuropsychiatry clinic. Finally, committed to the Stanford clinical community, he leads a support group for Internal Medicine interns and residents.