School of Medicine


Showing 31-34 of 34 Results

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Themistoklis Tsarouchas

    Themistoklis Tsarouchas

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychiatry

    BioThemis completed his PhD at the Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences of the University of Edinburgh in Scotland under Prof Catherina Becker, with focus on the contribution of the innate immune system during regeneration of the zebrafish spinal cord. As a postdoctoral researcher with Prof Anna Williams at the Centre for Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh he worked on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the differentiation and functional maturation of human oligodendrocytes. Over the last few years, he worked on several projects focused on the identification of genes that regulate the axonal regeneration of spinal cord after injury and the differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into myelin producing oligodendrocytes. As a member in the Gibson lab, Themis aims to identify molecular regulators of the circadian clock and how tuning the circadian system affects the maturation and function of oligodendrocytes in health and disease.

  • Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioJason Tucciarone MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor with Stanford School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. As a neuroscientist, he leads a lab interested in biological mechanisms of mental illness and investigating new therapies for mood disorders and addiction. In particular, he is defining new cell types and evolutionary conserved circuits in emotional processing centers of the brain, with the hope of finding new entry points for novel therapeutics. Working with Dr Robert Malenka, he is using optogenetic, chemogenetic, neuroimaging and behavioral approaches in mouse models of addiction to uncover vulnerable brain circuitry in opioid use disorder. Alongside Dr Alan Schatzberg, he is investigating the efficacy of buprenorphine augmentation to IV ketamine infusion at reducing suicidality in treatment resistant depression.

    Clinically, he works collaboratively in the department’s Neuropsychiatry clinic and his clinical focus includes treating patients with diverse and complex presentations at the interface of psychiatry and neurology with particular interest in functional neurological disorders. He sees a small cohort of psychotherapy patients in Individual Psychotherapy Clinic. He also works weekend shifts on Stanford’s inpatient psychiatry units.

    Prior to training in psychiatry at Stanford’s research residency track Jason received his bachelor’s degree in biology and philosophy from Union College. He spent three years as a Post-Baccalaureate IRTA fellow at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke investigating and developing MRI reportable contrast agents to map neuronal connectivity. Following this he entered the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) at the State University of NY Stony Brook University. There he completed a doctoral dissertation in neuroscience under the mentorship Dr. Josh Huang at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. His thesis work employed mouse genetic dissections of excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits with a focus on the circuitry of chandelier inhibitory interneurons in prefrontal cortex.

    In addition to his research and clinical work, Jason is passionate about teaching, mentorship, and resident clinical supervision. He joined a working group early in his clinical residency to restructure trainee’s neuroscience education. He teaches introductory lectures in the neuroscience of addiction, PTSD, psychosis, and mood disorders. He also leads resident group supervision in their introductory psychodynamic psychotherapy clinical experience. He supervises medical students, residents, and clinical fellows in Neuropsychiatry clinic. Finally, committed to the Stanford clinical community, he leads a support group for Internal Medicine interns and residents.