School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 209 Results

  • Sophia Y. Wang, MD, MS

    Sophia Y. Wang, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use and integrate a wide variety of data sources in my research, spanning both structured and unstructured forms, including national survey datasets, health insurance claims data, patient generated online text, surgical video, and electronic health records. I investigate outcomes of treatments for glaucoma and cataract, as well as other areas of ophthalmology. My focus is on developing artificial intelligence methods to predict ophthalmology outcomes, while ensuring fairness.

  • Sui Wang, PhD

    Sui Wang, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying retinal development and diseases. We employ genetic and genomic tools to explore how various retinal cell types, including neurons, glia, and the vasculature, respond to developmental cues and disease insults at the epigenomic and transcriptional levels. In addition, we investigate their interactions and collective contributions to maintain retinal integrity.

    1. Investigating retinal development:
    We utilize genetic tools and methods such as in vivo plasmid electroporation and CRISPR to dissect the roles of cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors in controlling retinal development.

    2. Understanding diabetes-induced cell-type-specific responses in the retina:
    Diabetes triggers a range of multicellular responses in the retina, such as vascular lesions, glial dysfunction, and neurodegeneration, all of which contribute to retinopathy. We delve into the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying these diabetes-induced cell-type-specific responses and the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

    3. Developing molecular tools for labeling and manipulation of specific cell types in vivo:
    Cis-regulatory elements, particularly enhancers, play pivotal roles in directing tissue- and cell-type-specific expression. Our interest lies in identifying enhancers that can drive cell type-specific expression in the retina and brain. We incorporate these enhancers into plasmid or AAV-based delivery systems, enabling precise labeling and manipulation of specific cell types in vivo.

  • Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory of Mechanisms in Human Immunity and Disease Pathogenesis

    Antibodies are a critical component of host defense. While the importance of humoral immunity has been recognized for decades, substantial gaps in knowledge remain around how antibodies function, and how their function is regulated, in vivo. Our laboratory performs studies designed to fill in these gaps, with the goal of enabling new vaccine and therapeutic strategies to prevent human disease. My interest in this area culminated from training in medicine, RNA virus biology (PhD), and molecular antibody biology (postdoctoral training). The intersection of these topics, viral immunity and disease pathogenesis, is the focus of our work. The essential question driving our research is why a small subset of people develop severe or fatal disease during viral infection while most infections result in a subclinical or mild outcome, even in at-risk populations. Our hypothesis is that the antibody signaling pathways that are engaged during viral infection through Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs) are a key driver of these distinct outcomes. We are focused on several major unknowns to address this hypothesis: How are antibody effector functions regulated in vivo and does this change in disease? How do distinct signaling pathways engaged by IgG immune complex-FcγR interactions impact host cell genetic regulation and the ultimate inflammatory/immune response? What are the tissue-specific functions that antibodies engage? How does the heterogeneity in post-translational modifications (PTMs) of human antibodies contribute to heterogeneity in viral immunity?



    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Teresa Wang

    Teresa Wang

    Klaus Bensch Professor in Experimental Pathology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe main focus of our research is to understand how cells maintain genome integrity by checkpoint mechanisms during chromosome replication.

  • Xinnan Wang

    Xinnan Wang

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms underlying mitochondrial dynamics and function, and their implications in neurological disorders.

  • Irene Wapnir, MD

    Irene Wapnir, MD

    Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical trials in operative procedures such as Nipple-sparing mastectomy, arm lymphatic mapping, skin perfusion and Treatments for Breast Cancer, especially local recurrence. Dr. Wapnir is institutional Principal Investigator and Chair for National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) clinical trials. Laboratory and translational research includes exploring the activity of breast iodide transporter in breast cancer brain metastasis.

  • Katherine T. Ward, MD

    Katherine T. Ward, MD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Ward is a board-certified, fellowship-trained geriatrician with Stanford Senior Care in Palo Alto, California. She is also board certified in hospice and palliative medicine and internal medicine. Dr. Ward is a clinical professor of medicine and clinical chief of the Geriatrics Section in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in many facets of care for older adults, including internal medicine, dementia care, and palliative care. Dr. Ward uses her extensive experience to teach and implement best practices in nursing home care, geriatric assessment, and care transitions for older adults.

    Dr. Ward’s research interests include early detection of dementia in vulnerable populations, dementia care support programs, and geriatric assessment in diverse populations.

    She has published her research in peer-reviewed journals including The American Journal of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy; The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging; and the Journal of Palliative Medicine. She has served as an ad hoc reviewer for several journals, including Geriatrics. She has also presented posters at annual meetings of the American Geriatrics Society and the Society of General Internal Medicine.

    Dr. Ward is a member of the American College of Physicians and the American Geriatrics Society.

  • Victoria Ward

    Victoria Ward

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlobal child health, digital health, preterm birth, human trafficking

  • Roger Warnke

    Roger Warnke

    Ronald F. Dorfman, M.B.B.ch., FRCPath, Professor in Hematopathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs an Emeritus Professor, I no longer have a research laboratory and devote my 10% voluntary effort to lymphoma diagnosis and teaching. I do devote a small amount of effort to lymphoma research in collaboration with Yaso Natkunam and others in the Department of Pathology.

  • Kathleen Watson

    Kathleen Watson

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioKathleen Watson, Ph.D., currently serves as an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, specializing in Epidemiology and Clinical Research. She co-founded Microclinic International in 2007, where she served as Chief Operating Officer until 2012, focusing on socially-based health interventions for underserved communities.

    Dr. Watson's research encompasses various aspects of mental health and metabolism. She investigates the connection between insulin resistance and depression, using computational psychiatry to uncover insights into the interplay of metabolic factors in mental well-being. Additionally, her exploration of cognitive aging examines how metabolic alterations might impact cognitive decline and related disorders. Furthermore, her research in proteomics aims to identify potential biomarkers for severe major depressive disorder. Dr. Watson has recently become a part of the Stanford Autism Center for Excellence Data Core, where she works under the guidance of Dr. Booil Jo.

  • Brian Wayda

    Brian Wayda

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHeart transplant policy and outcomes, cost-effectiveness, mathematical modeling

  • Robert Waymouth

    Robert Waymouth

    Robert Eckles Swain Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    BioRobert Eckles Swain Professor in Chemistry Robert Waymouth investigates new catalytic strategies to create useful new molecules, including bioactive polymers, synthetic fuels, and sustainable plastics. In one such breakthrough, Professor Waymouth and Professor Wender developed a new class of gene delivery agents.

    Born in 1960 in Warner Robins, Georgia, Robert Waymouth studied chemistry and mathematics at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia (B.S. and B.A., respectively, both summa cum laude, 1982). He developed an interest in synthetic and mechanistic organometallic chemistry during his doctoral studies in chemistry at the California Institute of Technology under Professor R.H. Grubbs (Ph.D., 1987). His postdoctoral research with Professor Piero Pino at the Institut fur Polymere, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, focused on catalytic hydrogenation with chiral metallocene catalysts. He joined the Stanford University faculty as assistant professor in 1988, becoming full professor in 1997 and in 2000 the Robert Eckles Swain Professor of Chemistry.

    Today, the Waymouth Group applies mechanistic principles to develop new concepts in catalysis, with particular focus on the development of organometallic and organic catalysts for the synthesis of complex macromolecular architectures. In organometallic catalysis, the group devised a highly selective alcohol oxidation catalyst that selectively oxidizes unprotected polyols and carbohydrates to alpha-hyroxyketones. In collaboration with Dr. James Hedrick of IBM, we have developed a platform of highly active organic catalysts and continuous flow reactors that provide access to polymer architectures that are difficult to access by conventional approaches.

    The Waymouth group has devised selective organocatalytic strategies for the synthesis of functional degradable polymers and oligomers that function as "molecular transporters" to deliver genes, drugs and probes into cells and live animals. These advances led to the joint discovery with the Wender group of a general, safe, and remarkably effective concept for RNA delivery based on a new class of synthetic cationic materials, Charge-Altering Releasable Transporters (CARTs). This technology has been shown to be effective for mRNA based cancer vaccines.

  • Mike Tzuhen Wei

    Mike Tzuhen Wei

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Wei was born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan. He went to Stanford for his undergraduate studies in Biology and earned his medical degree at Weill Cornell Medical College. Unable to stay far from the Bay Area, he returned to Stanford where he completed his residency in internal medicine and subsequently his fellowship in gastroenterology. Dr. Wei has specific interests in colorectal cancer and Barrett’s esophagus surveillance as well as reflux diagnosis and management. He has an interest in endoscopic resection of large polyps and had received training under Dr. Shai Friedland, a world expert in this field. Dr. Wei work focuses on evaluating new tools, technologies and techniques in gastrointestinal cancer surveillance and management. He has been involved in running several trials in endoscopic management of polyps and evaluating artificial intelligence applications in gastroenterology. His work has been published in American Journal of Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Clinical Endoscopy, VideoGIE, and Digestive Diseases and Sciences. He was formerly an Associate Editor for the ACG Case Report Journal (2020-2022) and was on the Board of the Northern California Society of Clinical Gastroenterology. When not in clinic or in endoscopy, Dr. Wei enjoys spending time with his family. He and his family enjoy traveling and exploring new restaurants.

  • Katja Gabriele Weinacht, MD, PhD

    Katja Gabriele Weinacht, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
    DiGeorge Syndrome
    Genetic Immune Diseases
    Immune Dysregulation

  • Ann Weinacker

    Ann Weinacker

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Weinacker's research interests center around ICU outcomes. Her specific interests include primary graft dysfunction in lung transplant recipients.

  • Alexa Rachel Weingarden

    Alexa Rachel Weingarden

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioAB in Earth and Planetary Sciences and Biology, Harvard College, 2008
    PhD in Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Minnesota, 2015
    MD, University of Minnesota, 2017
    Internal Medicine Residency, Stanford, 2017-2019
    Gastroenterology Fellowship, Stanford, 2019 - Present

  • Eva Weinlander

    Eva Weinlander

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWomen's Health
    Mind Body Medicine
    Chronic Disease Management

  • Dana Weintraub

    Dana Weintraub

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include: 1) Childhood obesity, community-based interventions to increase physical activity 2) Impact of medical-legal collaboration on child and family health.

  • William Weis

    William Weis

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies molecular interactions that underlie the establishment and maintenance of cell and tissue structure. Our principal areas of interest are the architecture and dynamics of intercellular adhesion junctions, signaling pathways that govern cell fate determination, and determinants of cell polarity. Our overall approach is to reconstitute macromolecular assemblies with purified components in order to analyze them using biochemical, biophysical and structural methods.

  • Thomas G Weiser, MD, MPH

    Thomas G Weiser, MD, MPH

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    BioDr. Thomas Weiser is a general, emergency, and trauma surgeon, and surgical intensivist. He treats and cares for injured patients and those with acute surgical emergencies as well as manages critically ill surgical patients in the Intensive Care Unit.

    His research is focused on evaluating the role surgical care plays in the delivery of health services in resource poor settings, in particular low and middle income countries. He is interested in barriers to access and provision of surgical care, the quality of surgical services, and outcomes research as well as the science of implementation, how improvements can be made, and how to strengthen compliance with best practices and change behaviors for the better. He also has an interest in domestic policy as it relates to trauma outcomes, trauma systems, insurance coverage and costs of care, and firearm violence.

    Dr. Weiser's projects have focused on the quality of surgical care, strategies for improving the safety and reliability of surgical delivery, and team communications. He works closely with Lifebox, a nonprofit focused on improving surgical and anesthetic safety worldwide, where he was previously the Consulting Medical Officer. Lifebox delivers programs throughout the world in combination with local partners including individual professionals, professional societies, hospitals, other NGOs, and ministries of health. Lifebox works with hospitals in Ethiopia, Liberia, Madagascar, India, Honduras, and Nicaragua, amongst others, to improve care and evaluate the impact of our work. A few programs of particular impact are the distribution of low cost devices to improve the safety of care (including pulse oximeters for the routine monitoring of patients undergoing anesthesia and a new surgical headlight program) and Clean Cut, a surgical infection prevention and control program now being introduced in several countries.

    From 2006-2009, he was part of the World Health Organization’s Safe Surgery Saves Lives program where he quantified the global volume of surgery and created, implemented, evaluated, and promoted the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist. He has worked with the WHO and the World Bank, and is completing a Gates Grand Challenge Grant-funded study to improve the safety of cesarean section in Ethiopia.

    He is a Program Director at Wellcome Leap where he leads Surgery:Assess/Validate/Expand (SAVE).

  • Eric A  Weiss, MD, FACEP

    Eric A Weiss, MD, FACEP

    Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy focus of research is wilderness medicine, including hypothermia, heat illness, altitude illness, improvised medical care in austere environments and wound care. I also have a strong interest in Disaster Medicine, Travel Medicine and International Health, and Pandemics.

  • Eric L. Weiss, MD, DTM&H

    Eric L. Weiss, MD, DTM&H

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIgnorance of Hepatitis A Among Travelers (writing up data).Travelers Neglecting to Seek Pre Travel Medicine Advice (writing up data).Fluoroquinolones in the Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections (new ED study)

  • Irving Weissman

    Irving Weissman

    Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, Professor of Pathology, and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStem cell and cancer stem cell biology; development of T and B lymphocytes; cell-surface receptors for oncornaviruses in leukemia. Hematopoietic stem cells; Lymphocyte homing, lymphoma invasiveness and metastasis; order of events from hematopoietic stem cells [HSC] to AML leukemia stem cells and blood diseases, and parallels in other tissues; discovery of tumor and pathogenic cell 'don't eat me' and 'eat me' signals, and translation into therapeutics.

  • Chad S. Weldy, M.D., Ph.D.

    Chad S. Weldy, M.D., Ph.D.

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a physician-scientist in the lab of Dr. Quertermous I work to understand the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease and the transcriptional and epigenomic mechanisms of atherosclerosis. My work is focused across four main areas of cardiovascular genetics and mechanisms of coronary artery disease and smooth muscle biology:
    1.Vascular smooth muscle specific ADAR1 mediated RNA editing of double stranded RNA and activation of the double stranded RNA receptor MDA5
    2.Defining on single cell resolution the cellular and epigenomic features of human vascular disease across vascular beds of differing embryonic origin
    3.CRISPRi screening with targeted perturb seq (TAPseq) to identify novel CAD genes in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells
    4.Investigation of the epigenetic and molecular basis of coronary artery disease and smooth muscle cell transition in mice with conditional smooth muscle genetic deletion of CAD genes Pdgfd and Sox9

    My work with Dr. Quertermous is focused on discovery of causal mechanisms of disease through leveraging human genetics with sophisticated molecular biology, single cell sequencing technologies, and mouse models of disease. This work attempts to apply multiple scientific research arms to ultimately lead to novel understandings of vascular disease and discover important new therapeutic approaches for drug discovery.

    Grant funding received for this work:

    Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award (K08)(NIH/NHLBI, 1 K08 HL167699-01), Submitted June, 2022. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: “ADAR Mediated RNA editing is a causal mechanism in coronary artery disease”.
    •Pending 08/01/2023 Start date
    •$850,000 over 5 years

    Career Development Award, American Heart Association (AHA CDA)(23CDA1042900), July, 2023 – June, 2026. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: “Linking RNA editing to coronary artery calcification and disease”
    •Activation on 07/01/2023
    •$231,000 over three years

    NIH Loan Repayment Program (LRP) Award (NIH/NHLBI) Renewal Award, July, 2023. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: “RNA editing is a causal mechanism of coronary artery disease”

    Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship (F32) (NIH/NHLBI, 1 F32 HL160067-01), July, 2021. PI: Weldy, Chad
    • Titled, “A transcriptional network which governs smooth muscle transition is mediated by causal coronary artery disease gene PDGFD”
    •*Received perfect score with impact score 10, 1st percentile

    NIH Loan Repayment Program (LRP) Award (NIH/NHLBI), July, 2021. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: "Single cell transcriptomic and epigenomic features of human atherosclerosis".
    •This will award up to $100,000 towards student loans over the next 24 months with opportunity for renewal after 24 months.

  • Andy Wen

    Andy Wen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    BioDr. Andy Y. Wen joined the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine as Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics in 2019. He received his B.A. degree in Molecular Biology & Biochemistry at Rutgers University, and his medical degree from Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He completed a Pediatrics Residency Training Program at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and a Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Training Program at the University of California Los Angeles.

    After briefly working for Kaiser Permanente Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Dr. Wen joined the Division of Pediatric Critical Care at NYU School of Medicine. He assumed the role of Bellevue Hospital PICU medical director and helped to expand Bellevue's Pediatric Trauma Program and Pediatric Critical Care Transport Services for the New York City (NYC) public hospital system, NYC Health & Hospitals. During the 2014 to 2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, Dr. Wen was a member of the Special Pathogens Program at Bellevue Hospital, which was one of only four institutions in the US to treat a patient with Ebola and helped established the National Ebola Training and Education Center (NETEC).

    While at UCLA, Dr. Wen received a T32 Training Grant to perform research investigating the role of transcription factor CREB in innate immune function using a murine model for AML. At NYU, his research projects included analyzing transfusion practices in the PICU, quality improvement projects targeting patients at high risk for unplanned extubation, and exploring the utility of NIRS as an early predictor of seizure activity. Dr. Wen is a member of Pediatric Acute Lung Injury & Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) and has been involved in multi-center studies looking at critical care patients with Bronchiolitis and COVID-19. Dr. Wen is the USA Editor for Journal of Pediatric Intensive Care and has reviewed abstracts for PAS, SCCM, and AMIA. His educational efforts have included teaching Pediatric Fundamental Critical Care Support (PFCCS) courses, helping develop a Pediatric Residency Simulation course curriculum, and helping develop a Point-of-Care Ultrasound course for critical care advanced practice providers.

    At Stanford University School of Medicine, Dr. Wen is in charge of Regional Pediatric Critical Care Outreach with a goal to promote medical education and expand the Stanford Children’s Health network to improve access for sick children in need of high quality care. Dr. Wen provides clinical services at both John Muir Medical Center and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.