School of Medicine


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  • Andrea Cipriano

    Andrea Cipriano

    Instructor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Reproductive Biology

    BioDr Andrea Cipriano is an instructor at the Stem Cell Institute and at the Ob/Gyn department at Stanford School of medicine. Since the beginning of his career he was driven by a deep interest in the complexities of life emerging from just a single cell, harboring all the instructions to produce a fully functional organism. His academic journey began with a Bachelor's in Biotechnology and progressed to a Master's in Genomic Biotechnology, where he delved into the intricate world of RNA. During his PhD, Andrea focused on long non-coding RNAs and their pivotal role in cell differentiation, a topic that continues to fascinate him in his current research. He works in the Sebastiano lab, and he is directing several projects, including studying the transcription factor TBX1 during development of the Pharyngeal endoderm, and exploring the impact of time on Chromatin Structure, particularly in the context of aging and its potential reversal. As an instructor, Andrea has been teaching for 4 years at the intensive CIRM stem cell class biology course. Teaching is a big passion that fuels his academic pursuits. His dedication to education stems from a deep-seated belief in the transformative power of knowledge, which is what initially propelled him into the academic world.

  • Margaret T. Fuller

    Margaret T. Fuller

    Reed-Hodgson Professor of Human Biology, Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor of Genetics and of Obstetrics/Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 07/19/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulation of self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation in adult stem cell lineages. Developmental tumor suppressor mechanisms and regulation of the switch from proliferation to differentiation. Cell type specific transcription machinery and regulation of cell differentiation. Developmental regulation of cell cycle progression during male meiosis.

  • Aaron Hsueh

    Aaron Hsueh

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHormonal regulation of ovarian function; gonadotropin receptors and related genes, bioinformatic ananlyses of polypeptide hormones and receptors, follicle recruitment and GDF-9; analysis of oocyte and ovarian-expressed genes.

  • Matteo Amitaba Mole'

    Matteo Amitaba Mole'

    Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive & Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study how the human embryo implants inside the maternal uterine tissue to establish a healthy pregnancy and the underlying maternal-embryo communication.

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Associate Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • Virginia D. Winn, MD, PhD

    Virginia D. Winn, MD, PhD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Winn Laboratory seeks to understand the unique biological mechanisms of human placentation. While the placenta itself is one of the key characteristics for defining mammals, the human placenta is different from most available animal models: it is one of the most invasive placentas, and results in the formation of an organ comprised of cells from both the fetus and the mother. In addition to this fascinating chimerism, fetal cells are deeply involved in the remodeling of the maternal vasculature in order to redirect large volumes of maternal blood to the placenta to support the developing fetus. As such, the investigation of this human organ covers a large array of biological processes, and deals not only with understanding its endocrine function, but the physiologic process of immune tolerance, vascular remodeling, and cellular invasion.