School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 226 Results

  • Asad Aali

    Asad Aali

    Casual - Non-Exempt, Rad/Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford

    BioI am a research engineer in the Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics group at Stanford (IBIIS). My work involves the development of artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms for applications in:
    1. Computer Vision
    2. Medical Imaging
    3. Biomedical Informatics

    I received my Master’s in Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) from The University of Texas at Austin, advised by Dr. Jon Tamir. During my MS in ECE, I completed a research internship at Amazon Health, exploring the application of large language models (LLMs) in clinical text summarization tasks. Previously, I graduated with a Master of Science in Information Technology (MSITM) from The University of Texas at Austin and completed my capstone project at Dell Technologies, as a Machine Learning Engineer.

  • Demir Akin, D.V.M., Ph.D.

    Demir Akin, D.V.M., Ph.D.

    Deputy Director, Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Rad/Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection

    Current Role at StanfordDeputy Director, Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics

  • Israt Alam

    Israt Alam

    Senior Research Scientist-Basic Life, Rad/Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    BioResearch Focus and interests: Molecular Imaging, PET, Immuno-Oncology, Graft versus Host Disease, CAR T cells

    Dr. Israt Alam is a Senior Scientist in the Radiology Department at Stanford University. She trained in Prof. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir's lab and transitioned to Dr. Michelle James' lab in 2021. Her research focuses on studying lymphocyte activation with the motivation of developing non-invasive imaging tools, to monitor immune dynamics in response to cancer immunotherapy and in immunopathology. Her work has supported the clinical translation of several nuclear imaging agents (small molecules and a biologic) for early detection of cancer and prediction of treatment response. She has also worked on several biomarker detection platforms for early disease detection. She is currently co-chair of the "Imaging in cell and immune therapies" (ICIT) interest group for the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS).



    Appointments:

    -Senior Research Scientist, James Lab, Department of Radiology, Stanford
    -Life Sciences Research Associate, Gambhir Lab, Department of Radiology, Stanford
    -Post-Doctoral Scholar, Gambhir Lab, Department of Radiology, Stanford
    -Visiting Researcher /Churchill Travel Fellow in the Plateforme d'imagerie dynamique lab of Prof. Spencer Shorte, Pasteur Institute, Paris
    -Science Education Consultant: United Nations Educational, Science and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Paris
    -Science Education Intern: United Nations Educational, Science and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Paris

  • David Anders

    David Anders

    Director, Cyclotron and Radiochemistry Facility, Rad/Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    Current Role at StanfordDirector of the Cyclotron and Radiochemistry Facility

    The CRF team is excited to be designing our second cyclotron facility where we will expand production into radiometals.

  • Robin Augustine

    Robin Augustine

    Basic Life Research Scientist, Rad/Pediatric Radiology

    Current Role at StanfordDr. Robin Augustine's current research interests revolve around three fascinating areas: graphene-based bioscaffolds, islet transplantation, and synchronized cellular response.

    In the field of graphene-based bioscaffolds, Dr. Augustine actively explores the potential of graphene as a biomaterial for tissue engineering. With its unique properties, graphene offers exceptional opportunities for developing innovative bioscaffolds. Dr. Augustine aims to design and engineer graphene-based materials that can provide structural support, promote cellular adhesion and growth, and enhance tissue regeneration. Leveraging the exceptional properties of graphene, such as its mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and biocompatibility, Dr. Augustine's goal is to contribute to the development of advanced bioscaffolds for various applications in regenerative medicine.

    Another area of Dr. Augustine's research focuses on islet transplantation, particularly in the context of treating diabetes. Islet transplantation holds promise as a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, involving the transfer of insulin-producing islet cells into the recipient's pancreas. Dr. Augustine investigates strategies to optimize islet transplantation techniques, improve the long-term viability of transplanted islets, and enhance their functionality. The ultimate objective is to contribute to the development of more effective and sustainable approaches for islet transplantation, with the aim of improving the quality of life for individuals living with diabetes.

    Dr. Augustine also explores the field of synchronized cellular response, recognizing its crucial role in tissue development, regeneration, and repair. The focus is on understanding and manipulating the synchronized cellular response in complex tissue systems. By studying the intricate signaling pathways and cellular interactions, Dr. Augustine aims to identify key factors and mechanisms that regulate coordinated cellular behavior. This knowledge can inform the development of strategies to enhance tissue regeneration and repair processes, potentially leading to improved outcomes in various biomedical applications.

    Through research in graphene-based bioscaffolds, islet transplantation, and synchronized cellular response, Dr. Augustine strives to contribute to the advancement of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and the development of innovative therapies for complex medical challenges.