School of Medicine


Showing 1-34 of 34 Results

  • Alyce Sophia Adams

    Alyce Sophia Adams

    Stanford Medicine Innovation Professor and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Health Policy and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    BioDr. Adams is the inaugural Stanford Medicine Innovation Professor and Professor of Health Policy, Epidemiology and Population Health and of Pediatrics (by Courtesy). She also serves as Associate Chair for Health Equity and Community Engagement for Stanford Health Policy, Associate Director for Health Equity and Community Engagement in the Stanford Cancer Institute, and as Associate Director for Stanford Impact Labs. Focusing on racial and socioeconomic disparities in chronic disease treatment outcomes, Dr. Adams' interdisciplinary research seeks to evaluate the impact of changes in drug coverage policy on access to essential medications, understand the drivers of disparities in treatment adherence among insured populations, and test strategies for maximizing the benefits of treatment outcomes while minimizing harms through informed decision-making. Prior to joining Stanford School of Medicine, Dr. Adams was Associate Director for Health Care Delivery and Policy and a Research Scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, as well as a Professor at the Bernard J. Tyson Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine. From 2000 to 2008, she was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Medicine (formerly Ambulatory Care and Prevention) at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care. She received her PhD in Health Policy and an MPP in Social Policy from Harvard University. She is a member of the Board of Directors for AcademyHealth and a former recipient of the John M. Eisenberg Excellence in Mentoring Award from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  • Ananta Addala

    Ananta Addala

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    BioDr. Ananta Addala is a pediatric endocrinologist and physician scientist addressing disparities in pediatric type 1 diabetes management and outcomes. As a physician with a background in pediatric endocrinology, epidemiology, and behavioral health, she aims to build an evidence-based approach to addressing T1D disparities by systematically evaluating youth-, family-, provider-, and system-level barriers to optimal diabetes care in youth from low socioeconomic and racial/ethnic minority groups.

    To date, her publications have demonstrated that the disparities in pediatric T1D by socioeconomic status are worsening in the US, provider bias against public insurance is common, and public insurance mediated interruptions to diabetes technology adversely impact glycemic outcomes. She has also been leading the efforts to improve justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion in research at Stanford University through her leadership at Stanford Pediatrics Advancing Anti-Racism Coalition and as the co-chair of TrialNet's Underrepresented Minorities Outreach Committee.

  • Eric Appel

    Eric Appel

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe underlying theme of the Appel Lab at Stanford University integrates concepts and approaches from supramolecular chemistry, natural/synthetic materials, and biology. We aim to develop supramolecular biomaterials that exploit a diverse design toolbox and take advantage of the beautiful synergism between physical properties, aesthetics, and low energy consumption typical of natural systems. Our vision is to use these materials to solve fundamental biological questions and to engineer advanced healthcare solutions.

  • Laura K. Bachrach

    Laura K. Bachrach

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrevention of osteoporosis begins in childhood and adolescence by measures that maximize acquistion of bone mineral during the critical adolescent years. Body mass, calcium nutriture, physical activity, growth and sex steroid hormones, and genetic factors are all thought to be important determinants of bone mass although the relative contribution of each remains controversial.

  • Bruce Buckingham

    Bruce Buckingham

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy major interest is in type 1 diabetes mellitus, continuous glucose sensor, and the development of an artificial pancreas. Other research interests include using continuous glucose monitoring and algorithms to control blood glucose levels in intensive care units.

  • Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Anna L Gloyn

    Anna L Gloyn

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAnna's current research projects are focused on the translation of genetic association signals for type 2 diabetes and glycaemic traits into cellular and molecular mechanisms for beta-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Her group uses a variety of complementary approaches, including human genetics, functional genomics, physiology and islet-biology to dissect out the molecular mechanisms driving disease pathogenesis.

  • Monica Grover

    Monica Grover

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioCLINICAL FOCUS:
    - Pediatric Endocrinology
    - Pediatric Diabetes
    - Pediatric Bone Health

  • Korey Hood

    Korey Hood

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychology)

    BioDr. Hood directs NIH- and foundation-funded clinical research aimed at promoting health and quality of life outcomes for people with diabetes. He has expertise and experience with diabetes epidemiology and interventions, study design, methodology, data management, and advanced statistical methods. There are two content threads to his work: 1) construct prevention and treatment programs to address modifiable psychological and family factors that create barriers to optimal diabetes management, and 2) optimize the use of devices and technologies to improve health outcomes. With regard to the first thread, Dr. Hood has successfully implemented depression screening programs in tertiary diabetes and GI clinics within a Quality Improvement framework, and recently completed a large scale clinical trial on a distress prevention program for teens with type 1 diabetes. Dr. Hood manages and analyzes all the data from these studies. From a device and technology standpoint, Dr. Hood coordinates the Human Factors assessments in Drs. Maahs’ and Buckingham’s closed loop studies and is recognized as one of the experts in this area nationally and internationally. In addition, he has implemented Human Factors assessments in national (e.g., T1D Exchange) studies and registries and is the lead psychologist on 2 of the 4 UC4 grants from NIDDK (Hovorka, PI; Bergenstal, PI). These assessments focus on uptake of devices and technologies, and determining strategies to promote uptake and optimize their use. Dr. Hood and his research team have published over 100 scientific articles on these topics and are active presenters at diabetes, behavioral medicine, and advocacy conferences.

    Dr. Hood also works in clinical and service settings. Dr. Hood is a licensed clinical psychologist and is part of the diabetes care team at Stanford. He is the past chair of the American Diabetes Association’s Behavioral Medicine and Psychology Interest Group and is currently a member of the Research Policy Committee. He was also a member of the ADA’s Call to Congress in March 2017. Dr. Hood is an Associate Editor for both Diabetes Care and Pediatric Diabetes.

  • Jennifer Ikle

    Jennifer Ikle

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsJen is interested in the genetic factors that lead to abnormal beta-cell function and insulin secretion, causing disorders such as hyperinsulinism and neonatal diabetes. Jen’s current research focus is the use of zebrafish models, combined with genetics and genomics, to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms of glucose metabolism and elucidate previously unknown players involved in the regulation of insulin secretion.

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    KM Mulberry Professor, Professor of Developmental Biology, of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the development of pancreatic islet cells using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, pigs, human pancreas, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. These approaches have informed efforts to generate replacement islets from renewable sources for diabetes.

  • Rayhan A. Lal, MD

    Rayhan A. Lal, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    BioI grew up in the east bay area and have had type 1 diabetes for 30+ years. I studied electrical engineering and computer science at U.C. Berkeley (Go Bears!) with the hope of applying my knowledge to diabetes technology. The significance of clinical practice became clear to me after my siblings also developed diabetes. I am devoting my life to advancing the care of diabetes in people of all ages.

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr David M. Maahs is the Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics, Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology, and Associate Chair for Academic Affairs in Pediatrics at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico’s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado’s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs’ leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as President-elect for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2021-25) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He served on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ‘Pink Panther,’ which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, prevent the complications of diabetes, and reduce disparities in diabetes care. He is author or co-author of over 350 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado. He is the PI on the Stanford NIH funded K12 "Training Research Leaders in Type 1 Diabetes.' Dr Maahs is also the Associate Chair for Academic Affairs for the Department of Pediatrics.

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their adult children.

  • Diana Naranjo

    Diana Naranjo

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioAs a licensed clinical psychologist working in diabetes and Cystic Fibrosis clinics for the past 10 years, Dr. Naranjo focuses on the psychosocial needs of patients and families with diabetes and CF. Through clinical research, she aims to understand barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management, how families and individuals with diabetes respond to health technology, and how to best provide services that engage youth and their families. She is a member of the Stanford Diabetes Research Center.

  • Jennifer Ni

    Jennifer Ni

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioI grew up mainly in the Bay Area of California, attending UC Berkeley for undergraduate (Go Bears!) with a major in Bioengineering. After a gap year working at a biotech start up, I traveled to the East Coast for medical school at the University of Pittsburgh, and then back to my birth state of Texas for residency at UT Southwestern. During my experiences in medical school and residency, I discovered that I enjoyed the logic of thinking through signaling pathways to understand the pathophysiology of endocrine disorders. In the future, I hope to combine my background in engineering with my passion for medicine to advance the field of endocrinology, especially in diabetes management. I am very excited to return to the Bay Area for fellowship in Pediatric Endocrinology. Outside of the hospital, I enjoy baking sweet treats, trying new restaurants, and running.

  • David Scheinker

    David Scheinker

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioDavid Scheinker is the Executive Director of Systems Design and Collaborative Research at the Stanford Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. He is the Founder and Director of SURF Stanford Medicine, a group that brings together students and faculty from the university with physicians, nurses, and administrators from the hospitals. SURF has implemented and published dozens of projects demonstrating improvements to the quality and efficiency of care. His areas of focus include clinical care delivery, technical improvements to hospital operations, sensor-based and algorithm-enabled telemedicine, and the socioeconomic factors that shape healthcare cost and quality.

    Before coming to Stanford, he was a Joint Research Fellow at The MIT Sloan School of Management and Massachusetts General Hospital. He received a PhD in theoretical math from The University of California San Diego under Jim Agler. He advises Carta Healthcare, a healthcare analytics company started by former students.

  • Sejal Shah

    Sejal Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary research interest is evaluating whether vitamin D supplementation can positively affect consequences of the metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adolescents. Other research interests include evaluating the efficacy and biochemical profiles of various types of estrogen replacement in adolescent females.

  • Diane Stafford

    Diane Stafford

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioDr. Stafford specializes in Pediatric Endocrinology with special interest in disorders of puberty and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Her research interests include in medical education curriculum development, faculty development and endocrine dysfunction in PWS.

  • Molly Tanenbaum

    Molly Tanenbaum

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioDr. Tanenbaum is a clinical researcher committed to improving health and quality of life outcomes for people with diabetes. Dr. Tanenbaum’s research focuses on two main areas: 1) understanding and optimizing the role of technology (e.g. mobile technology/mHealth, diabetes devices, closed-loop systems), and the feedback technology provides, to improve diabetes management; and 2) understanding the emotional experience of living with diabetes. Her recent work has focused on developing a telehealth-based behavioral intervention for adults with type 1 diabetes to support adoption and sustained use of continuous glucose monitoring technology. She has expertise in using qualitative and mixed methods to take a human centered approach to understanding the context of living with and managing a chronic condition. Dr. Tanenbaum also has an interest in compassion-based approaches to addressing diabetes distress. As a licensed clinical psychologist, Dr. Tanenbaum provides consultation and behavioral medicine interventions with people living with diabetes.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Dessi Zaharieva

    Dessi Zaharieva

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe 4T (Teamwork, Targets, Technology, and Tight Control) Exercise Study focuses on addressing the attitudes & barriers to exercise for families and newly diagnosed youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We are currently establishing feasibility and understanding physical activity patterns and behaviours in newly diagnosed youth with T1D using wearable activity trackers. This work also involves delivering structured exercise education to families and youth with T1D over telehealth.