School of Medicine


Showing 1-12 of 12 Results

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWhat distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Tamar Green

    Tamar Green

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Green is a physician-scientist and a child psychiatrist who work primarily with children with neurodevelopmental disorders such as ADHD and autism as well as with children with known genetic conditions (“neurogenetic syndromes” such as Noonan syndrome and other Rasopathies, Turner syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome). She gained her training as a child psychiatrist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. She has completed a postdoctoral research fellow in neuroscience at the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and currently, she is an Assistant Professor at the department. Dr. Green's research focus is the Rasopathies, a collection of syndromes associated with genetic mutations affecting the Ras/MAPK pathway. Among the Rasopathies, she is specifically interested in Noonan syndrome. These studies are directed at uncovering neural correlates associated with deficits in attention, memory and social skills in this syndrome. Results for this ongoing research also have the potential to yield valuable new insights into the role of the Ras/MAPK pathway in brain development in general, and attention, memory, and social skills.

  • Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary area of scholarly and clinical interest is the pathogenesis of problem behaviors shown by individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), particularly those with neurogenetic forms of IDD, such as fragile X syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome. My work aims to both advance understanding of these disorders and to identify effective new treatment approaches for pediatric and adult patient populations by state-of-the-art methodologies, such as brain imaging, eye tracking and functional analysis to determine how environmental and biological factors affect the development of aberrant behaviors in these syndromes. The end goal of my research is to create patient-specific methods for treating the symptoms of these disorders.

  • SM Hadi Hosseini

    SM Hadi Hosseini

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab’s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, cognitive neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses).

    The ultimate goal of our research is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

  • Booil Jo

    Booil Jo

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLatent Variable Modeling, Causal Inference, Longitudinal Data Analysis, Missing Data Analysis, Mixture and Growth Mixture Modeling, Prevention Science Methodology.

  • Allan L. Reiss

    Allan L. Reiss

    Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR), focuses on multi-level scientific study of individuals with typical and atypical brain structure and function. Data are obtained from genetic analyses, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, assessment of endocrinological status, neurobehavioral assessment, and analysis of pertinent environmental factors. Our overarching focus is to model how brain disorders arise and to develop disease-specific treatments.

  • Manish Saggar

    Manish Saggar

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I firmly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls.

  • Gisela Sandoval

    Gisela Sandoval

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research

    BioDr. Gisela Sandoval is a physician scientist with dual board certification who specializes in medical-psychiatric illness caring for individuals that suffer from medical conditions at the interface of medicine and psychiatry, which often requires complex chronic care. In addition she treats children with a broad range of psychiatric disorders including neurodevelopmental disorders, ADHD and mood and anxiety disorders in adolescents. She has a thorough and comprehensive way to approach her patients; she considers not only the clinical symptoms but also the impact of the family structure and the functioning of the child at school. Dr. Sandoval has a special interest in establishing standard of care guidelines to address the needs of chronically ill children to promote healthy habits and medical treatment compliance that promote health and decrease the burden of chronic medical and psychiatric illness.
    Dr. Sandoval graduated with honors from the California Institute of Technology where she performed research in brain physiology and evolution. She earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School where she also completed a Ph.D. specializing in molecular neurobiology and genetics. Dr. Sandoval completed her residency in general psychiatry at the University of Chicago, during which she received the NIMH Outstanding Resident Award. She went on to complete a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency of Columbia and Cornell Universities. After training she became the Clinical Director of the Warren Wright Adolescent Center at Northwestern University developing a successful clinical program focused on early identification and intervention for adolescents at risk of mental illness before moving to Stanford.
    Dr. Sandoval scientific interests focus on understanding the molecular, neurophysiological and neural circuits that are responsible for healthy brain development and behavior and understanding how these are altered in the developmental neuropsychiatric disorders resulting in pathological behaviors with the expectation that that could lead to new treatments. Furthermore, she is interested in identifying quantifiable metrics of behavior to better diagnosis mental illness by exploring the use of physical activity monitors to help assess the effectiveness of medical therapies.