School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 35 Results

  • Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Binkley is a radiation oncologist specializing in lymphoma treatment and an assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology.

    His clinical expertise includes stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), total lymphoid and total body irradiation, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).

    For each patient, Dr. Binkley develops a personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plan. His goals are to improve both health and quality of life.

    Dr. Binkley has conducted extensive research to advance cancer treatment. In his post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford, he studied the use of genomic signatures to predict response to radiotherapy. His current clinical and laboratory research seek to identify prognostic and predictive clinical, radiographic, and genomic factors to inform individualized treatment strategies.

    He has co-authored articles on his research discoveries published in Cancer Discovery, Blood, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, and elsewhere. Topics have included innovations in the treatment of lymphoma and lung cancer.

    He also has made invited presentations to colleagues at national and international conferences. He has presented the latest findings on radiation therapy for lung cancer and lymphoma at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma (ICML).

    Honors for Dr. Binkley include the Malcolm A. Bagshaw Award for leadership and outstanding scientific achievement. This award is named for a pioneer in radiation therapy and former chair of the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Binkley is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and American Association for Cancer Research. He is a founding member of the Global nLPHL One Working (GLOW) Working Group, an international collaboration studying nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) in children and adults.

  • Martin Brown

    Martin Brown

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe seek to understand the mechanisms responsible for the resistance of cancers to treatment and to develop strategies to overcome these resistances. We are using molecular and cellular techniques and mouse models to potentiate the activity of radiation on tumors by inhibiting the bone marrow rescue of the tumor vasculature following therapy.

  • Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Mark Buyyounouski, MD, MS, FASTRO

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPatient-centered and artificial intelligence-augmented medical decision making

  • Karlene Cimprich

    Karlene Cimprich

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenomic instability contributes to many diseases, but it also underlies many natural processes. The Cimprich lab is focused on understanding how mammalian cells maintain genomic stability in the context of DNA replication stress and DNA damage. We are interested in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to replication stress and DNA damage as well as the links between DNA damage and replication stress to human disease.

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Jack, Lulu, and Sam Willson Professor and Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)
    On Leave from 11/27/2023 To 08/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on two main areas: 1) cancer stem cell biology and 2) novel biomarkers for identifying the presence of malignant cells (diagnostic), predicting outcome (prognostic), and predicting response to therapy (predictive). Areas of study include cancers of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal system. Clinically I specialize in the treatment of lung cancer and applications of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and perform both prospective and retrospective clinical studies.

  • Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Frederick M. Dirbas, MD

    Associate Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrently collaborating with Dr's Aaron Newman and Michael Clarke to study cancer stem cells associated with triple negative breast cancer. Advancing studies of FLASH radiotherapy in preclinical models for potential future use in humans. Investigating preclinical use of high dose gaseous nitric oxide in the treatment of solid tumors.

  • Scott Dixon

    Scott Dixon

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is interested in the relationship between cell death and metabolism. Using techniques drawn from many disciplines my laboratory is investigating how perturbation of intracellular metabolic networks can result in novel forms of cell death, such as ferroptosis. We are interested in applying this knowledge to find new ways to treat diseases characterized by insufficient (e.g. cancer) or excessive (e.g. neurodegeneration) cell death.

  • Michael Gensheimer

    Michael Gensheimer

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn addition to my clinical research in head and neck and lung cancer, I work on the application of computer science and machine learning to cancer research. I develop tools for analyzing large datasets to improve outcomes and safety of cancer treatment. I developed a machine learning prognostic model using data from around 13,000 patients with metastatic cancer which performs better than traditional models and physicians [PubMed ID 33313792]. We recently completed a prospective randomized study in thousands of patients in which the model was used to help improve advance care planning conversations.

    I also work on the methods underpinning observational and predictive modeling research. My open source nnet-survival software that allows use of neural networks for survival modeling has been used by researchers internationally. In collaboration with the Stanford Research Informatics Center, I examined how electronic medical record (EMR) survival outcome data compares to gold-standard data from a cancer registry [PubMed ID 35802836]. The EMR data captured less than 50% of deaths, a finding that affects many studies being published that use EMR outcomes data.

  • Amato J. Giaccia

    Amato J. Giaccia

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor, Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDuring the last five years, we have identified several small molecules that kill VHL deficient renal cancer cells through a synthetic lethal screening approach. Another major interest of my laboratory is in identifying hypoxia-induced genes involved in invasion and metastases. We are also investigating how hypoxia regulates gene expression epigenetically.

  • Iris C. Gibbs, MD, FACR, FASTRO

    Iris C. Gibbs, MD, FACR, FASTRO

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Leave from 05/01/2024 To 04/22/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Gibbs is a board-certified radiation oncologist who specializes in the treatment of CNS tumors. Her research focuses on developing new radiation techniques to manage brain and spinal tumors in adults and children. Dr. Gibbs has gained worldwide acclaim for her expertise in Cyberknife robotic radiosurgery.

  • Edward Graves

    Edward Graves

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplications of molecular imaging in radiation therapy, development of hypoxia and radiosensitivity imaging techniques, small animal image-guided conformal radiotherapy, image processing and analysis.

  • Xuejun Gu

    Xuejun Gu

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Medical Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsArtificial intelligence in medicine
    Medical imaging and image anlysis
    Treatment planning and clinical decision-making
    FLASH radiobiology study ;

  • Philip C. Hanawalt

    Philip C. Hanawalt

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor in Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interest includes two principal areas:

    1. The molecular basis for diseases in which the pathway of transcription-coupled DNA repair is defective, including Cockyne syndrome (CS) and UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS). Patients are severely sensitive to sunlight but get no cancers. See Hanawalt & Spivak, 2008, for review.

    2. Transcription arrest by guanine-rich DNA sequences and non-canonical secondary structures. Transcription collisions with replication forks.

  • Stefan Heller

    Stefan Heller

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the inner ear, from its earliest manifestation as one of the cranial placodes until it has developed into a mature and functioning organ. We are interested in how the sensory epithelia of the inner ear that harbor the sensory hair cells develop, how the cells mature, and how these epithelia respond to toxic insults. The overarching goal of this research is to find ways to regenerate lost sensory hair cells in mammals.

  • Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Kalbasi is a board-certified radiation oncologist and physician-scientist at the Stanford Cancer Institute. He is also an associate professor of radiation oncology at Stanford Medicine and a project member of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    In the clinic, Dr. Kalbasi specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors, especially sarcoma and melanoma, with a focus on bringing new treatments to patients. This focus includes using advanced techniques in radiation oncology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Dr. Kalbasi's NIH-funded laboratory studies the cancer-immune interface in various therapeutic contexts, including T cell therapy, cytokine therapy and innate immune agonism. The lab has described tumor cell-, T cell- and myeloid cell-intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to therapy and approaches to overcome therapy resistance. Dr. Kalbasi is also an experienced leader of clinical trials related to immunotherapy, T cell therapy and radiation therapy.

    Prior to his arrival at Stanford Health Care, Dr. Kalbasi was assistant professor of radiation oncology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and chief of sarcoma radiotherapy at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. During his tenure, he was named a NextGen Star by the American Association of Cancer Research in recognition for excellence in cancer research.

    Dr. Kalbasi’s work has been published in leading journals including Nature, Science Translational Medicine, JAMA Oncology, Lancet Oncology, Nature Cancer and Cancer Discovery. He has served as a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cell and the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has also presented research to his peers at the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  • Susan Knox

    Susan Knox

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur interests include 1) study of the effect of radiation on regulatory cell subpopulations and co-stimulatory molecules, 2) use of radiation as an immune modulator for optimization of transplant regimens, 3) the role of radiation in tumor vaccine strategies, 4) study of new radiosensitizers and radioprotectors, and 5) discovery of new targeted therapies for the treatment of solid tumors.