School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 63 Results

  • Andrei Iagaru

    Andrei Iagaru

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research projects include:
    1) PET/MRI and PET/CT for Early Cancer Detection
    2) Targeted Radionuclide Therapy
    3) Clinical Translation of Novel PET Radiopharmaceuticals;

  • David Iberri, MD

    David Iberri, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioDr. Iberri is a medical oncologist and hematologist who specializes in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. His clinical practices runs the gamut of malignant and non-malignant hematologic disorders including acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma and lymphomas, and bleeding and thrombotic disorders. He is actively involved in clinical trials evaluating novel agents in hematologic malignancies. His research interests are in the development and application of biomarkers to select patients most likely to benefit from therapy.

  • Ibrahim A. Idakoji MD, MPH

    Ibrahim A. Idakoji MD, MPH

    Clinical Instructor, Radiology

    BioIbrahim Idakoji is a native of the Bay Area and practicing Interventional Radiologist at Stanford Medical Center who specializes in minimally invasive, image-guided percutaneous and endovascular procedures that aid in the diagnosis and treatment of complex vascular and oncologic disease. Some of his areas of interest include: treatment of both acute and chronic venous thromboembolic disease, treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignancy, and percutaneous pain management.

  • Juliana Idoyaga

    Juliana Idoyaga

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of dendritic cells, which are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body’s immune responses. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, dendritic cells are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

    Dendritic cells are not one cell type, but a network of cells comprised of many subsets or subpopulations with distinct developmental pathways and tissue localization. It is becoming apparent that each dendritic cell subset is different in its capacity to induce and modulate specific types of immune responses; however, there is still a lack of resolution and deep understanding of dendritic cell subset functional specialization. This gap in knowledge is an impediment for the rational design of immune interventions. Our research program focuses on advancing our understanding of mouse and human dendritic cell subsets, revealing their endowed capacity to induce distinct types of immune responses, and designing novel strategies to exploit them for vaccines and therapies.

  • Debra M. Ikeda, M.D., FACR, FSBI

    Debra M. Ikeda, M.D., FACR, FSBI

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are quality improvement in mammography positioning, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) cancer detection and imaging pitfalls, MRI-guided breast biopsy, MRI BIRADS 3 lesions, fiducial markers for Radiation Therapy, correlation of breast cancer and FDG PET imaging, percutaneous breast biopsy

  • Fumiaki Ikeno

    Fumiaki Ikeno

    Program Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign, Medicine - Med/Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioProgram Director (U.S) Japan Biodesign, Stanford Biodesign
    Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University


    Dr. Ikeno is a Research Associate, Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University. In this role, he is responsible for pre clinical studies including GLP for medical devices and also regenerative medicines for cardiovascular diseases. Currently, he is devoting himself to the international regulatory project between Japan and the United States, also known as "Harmonization by Doing", whose focus is to collaborate with regulatory agencies such as FDA, PMDA/MHLW, academia and industries for improving the regulatory process in the 2 largest medtech markets. Dr. Ikeno also devoted himself to found Japan biodesign program which is a collaborative program with University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tohoku University, Japan Federation Medical Device Association, Ministry of Education Japan and Stanford biodesign program. Currently, Dr. Ikeno serves as the Program Director (US) for Japan Biodesign. Dr. Ikeno is co-founder and board member of US-Japan MedTech Frontier which is a non-profit cooperate to make a trans-pacific eco-system of medical device between Japan and USA.

    After 9 years clinical practice as an interventional cardiologist and Family Doctor in rural areas of Japan, Dr. Ikeno came to Stanford as a Researcher and completed his Biodesign Certificate Program. Being part of the ecosystem in Silicon Valley, Dr. Ikeno participated in more than 200 medtech projects and 50 GLP studies as well as in the analysis of clinical trials for cardiovascular medicine (BARI2D, FAME, ReOPEN etc). His other academic consortium projects include Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, Global Consensus Working Group of Optical Coherence Tomography, and Japan-US consensus document for the treatment of critical limb ischemia.

    Over the last decade, Dr. Ikeno has served as an advisor for medical device industries and currently serves as a chief medical officer of an incubation fund specific for medtech (Medventure Partners, Inc, Tokyo) as a spin-off from Innovation Network Corporation of Japan (INCJ) that is the largest government and private partnership fund in Japan. He is also serving as a chair of cardiovascular working group of APAN (Asian Pacific Advanced Network) that contributes the remote education, research activities, and tele-health using a specialized internet network. Dr.Ikeno is also serving as consulting faculty/lecturer roles in several universities in Japan including University of Tokyo, Osaka University, Tsukuba University etc. Dr. Ikeno has authored over 70 peer reviewed publications and textbooks and has been invited to lecture at international medical conferences. Dr. Ikeno is a council member of U.S.- Japan Council which is a non-profit organization by Japanese American. He is serving as a mentor for START-X MED which is an accelerating program for Stanford related entrepreneurs in medical fields.

    Contact Information


    Falk CVRC CV007
    300 Pasteur Drive
    Palo Alto, CA 94305-5406

  • Alvan Ikoku

    Alvan Ikoku

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIkoku's research traces confluences in science and literature that have long constituted modern medical and ethics discourse — dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the present period, and particularly where Africa and its diaspora are points of representation

    His scholarship has thus been in three areas. First, work that details the place of colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures in the evolution of tropical medicine and global health as medical fields, with writing on malaria and Africa as a primary focus. His current book, Forms of Global Health, and a forthcoming article, 'Reading Malaria Literature,' are part of this research, as is previous writing for the World Health Organization. Second, a series of long articles that detail efforts by writers of African descent to examine space, race and gender as genres of self-governance. And third, work that traces the emergence of modern fiction as an alternative mode for ethical thought regarding humane care and human subjects research. Here, he has published with Virtual Mentor as well as Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, and he is developing a second book project on the Literature of Human Experimentation.

    Finally, Ikoku's research has been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, Columbia University Research Grants, the Marjorie Hope Nicolson Fellowship, and the Rhodes Trust.

  • Daniel Imler, MD

    Daniel Imler, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in understanding the impact of smart, agile clinical pathways to drive behavior change among providers.

  • Fatih Inci

    Fatih Inci

    Basic Life Sci Res Assoc, Rad/Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection

    Current Role at StanfordDr. Fatih Inci’s area of excellence in research is to create micro- and nano-scale platform technologies at the intersection of medicine, biomedical engineering, biotechnology, chemistry, and materials science by manipulating biomolecules, cells and viruses in small volumes that offers precise solutions for real-world challenges in clinical diagnostics, personalized medicine, early cancer detection, forensic science, and biomarker discovery.

    SOME OF THE RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS and NEWS
    •New device selects healthy sperm (Stanford Medicine) (2018).
    •WPI Researchers Play Critical Role to Create Sperm-Sorting Device That Could Improve IVF Success (Worcester Polytechnic Institute) (2018).
    •Sperm ‘obstacle course’ created by scientists to select healthiest ones for IVF (The Independent UK) (2018).
    •Separating the weak from the strong: New device sorts sperm (Scope by Stanford Medicine) (2018).
    •Interview on Istanbul University, Science Faculty - Faculty Guide (2017).
    •Bioengineering and Biomedicine - Interview on Crossing Paths (2017).
    •RöporTAF Interview on TAV Network (2017).
    •Scientists develop new HIV diagnostic device (Johns Hopkins News-Letter) (2016).
    •Potential point-of-care diagnostic platform (EurekAlert – Science AAAS) (2015).
    •A New Platform for Point-of-Care Diagnostics? (Optics&Photonics News) (2015).
    •Universelle Diagnostik: Ein Bluttest für alles (Deutschlandfunk) (2015).
    •Smarter, Cheaper Technologies Offer Improved Point-of-care Medicine (NIH – National Institue of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering) (2015).
    •New HIV Test May Improve Point-of-care Medicine in Remote Regions (Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)) (2015).
    •New Biosensing Platform to be used in Disease Detection (Dartmouth University)
    •Paper and Phones Could Soon Diagnose Ebola and HIV for $1 (Newsweek) (MSN News) (2015).
    •Biosensing Films and Smartphones Let Doctors Diagnose Disease from Anywhere (Popular Science) (2015).
    •Bientôt un diagnostic médical avec son smartphone (Futura Sciences) (2015).
    •Novel Biosensing Platform Could Remotely Diagnose Disease And Monitor Treatment (BioSpace) (2015).
    •Smarter, cheaper technologies for improved point-of-care medicine in remote areas (Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence) (2015).
    •App may detect bacterial infections (TV news in WPLG TV, an affiliate of ABC News) (2015).
    •Un sistema permite diagnosticar enfermedades por el cellular (Investigacion y Desarrollo) (2015).
    •Smartphone accessory puts HIV diagnosis in doctors' pockets (Engadget) (2015).
    •Cell Phone App Detects Bacteria and Infectious Diseases (HCP Live) (2015).
    •New Biosensing Platform Could Quickly and Accurately Diagnose Disease and Monitor Treatment Remotely (Florida Atlantic University) (2015).
    •Smart phone diagnosis? Biosensing platform quickly and accurately diagnoses disease and monitors treatment remotely (ScienceDaily) (2015).
    •Smartphone App Detects Bacteria, Diseases (Highlights in Product, Design & Development) (Nature World News) (2015).
    •Novel biosensing platform could remotely determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli (News-Medical Net) (2015)
    •Nanomechanical motion of Escherichia coli adhered to a surface – (Canary Center at Stanford Newsletter) (2014).
    •And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever – (American Institute of Physics) (Phys.org) (EurekAlert – Science AAAS) (ScienceDaily) (Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence) (2014).
    •It’s flagella against the Cantilever for the fate of bacteria – (Boston University) (Science 2.0) (2014).
    •Palo Alto Weekly - Stoking a passion for science (News Cover) (2014).
    •Disposable Chips to Detect Antiepileptic Drug Serum Concentrations at the Point of Care using Nanoplasmonic Platform – Brigham & Women’s Hospital, BRIght Future Prize (Nature Medicine) (Brigham & Women’s Hospital) (2013).