School of Medicine


Showing 501-550 of 572 Results

  • Margo Thienemann

    Margo Thienemann

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Disorder

  • Allison L. Thompson, Ph.D.

    Allison L. Thompson, Ph.D.

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Allison Thompson specializes in the treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, anxiety and depression, and severe mental illness. She has practiced at Stanford since 2008. She has a special interest in the treatment of underrepresented and underserved populations, such as people of color.

  • Dolores Gallagher Thompson, PhD, ABPP

    Dolores Gallagher Thompson, PhD, ABPP

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research focuses on use of technology to improve mental health of older persons and their family members. I have a strong interest in how cultural diversity impacts mental health access, services, and outcomes. I am currently involved in several international research and demonstration projects in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the health care system in Thailand as well as projects in the US - notably, with rural caregivers and those of Asian American ancestry.

  • Jamie L. Tingey, PhD

    Jamie L. Tingey, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Sleep Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Tingey’s research broadly focuses on factors that promote positive outcomes in patients with complex and/or chronic conditions. She is committed to research that focuses on outcomes that are valued by patients and healthcare stakeholders.

    Some of her research interests include self-management interventions in chronic conditions (e.g., multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury) and adapting evidence-based treatments to provide equitable care to individuals with chronic conditions and disabilities. She is also passionate about integrating psychology services into critical care settings to improve health outcomes among ICU survivors.

  • Julie Tinklenberg

    Julie Tinklenberg

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Vaden Health Center

    BioDr. Julie Tinklenberg specializes in the treatment of mental illness in the university setting. She has worked in college mental health for over 15 years. Dr.Tinklenberg has a special interest in anxiety disorders, parenting issues, mood disorders and interpersonal/relationship problems.

  • Hui Qi Tong

    Hui Qi Tong

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Medical Psychiatry

    BioClinical Professor, Stanford Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor, Stanford Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
    HS Clinical Assistant Professor, UCSF Department of Psychiatry & San Francisco VA Health Care
    Staff Psychologist: Women's Mental Health Program, San Francisco VA Health Care System
    Academic visitor: Oxford Mindfulness Center, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford University
    Psychology Post-doctoral Fellowship: UCSF/San Francisco VA Health Care System
    Psychology Pre-doctoral Internship: UCSF/San Francisco VA Health Care System
    Psychology Education: Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, Palo Alto University (2008)
    Clinical Research Associate: Department of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine
    Research Fellow: Genetics Division, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital,Harvard Medical School
    Medical Education: Fudan University, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai, China (1994)

  • Aubrey Toole, PhD

    Aubrey Toole, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Aubrey Toole is a licensed psychologist whose research and clinical work has focused on the treatment and prevention of eating and body image problems and the potential benefits of compassion- and acceptance-based interventions. Dr. Toole further specializes in treating eating and body image concerns in high performance athletes at Stanford. Clinically, she works with a range of presentations, including eating and body image concerns, mood and anxiety difficulties, interpersonal problems, and post-traumatic stress, as well as rigid perfectionism, harsh self-critical thinking, and shame. She completed her bachelor’s degree in Psychology with Highest Honors at UC Berkeley and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Emory University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Emory University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, where she worked with children, adolescents, and young adults with eating disorders, emotion regulation difficulties, anxiety, depression, OCD, and PTSD. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University’s School of Medicine within the Psychosocial Treatment Clinic, where her training focused on evidence-based treatments for eating disorders, anxiety and mood disorders, couples, and high-performance athletes, as well as clinical supervision.

  • Jacob Towery

    Jacob Towery

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioJacob Towery, MD is an adolescent and adult psychiatrist in private practice in Palo Alto, California. He attended Duke University for his undergraduate studies, University of Virginia for medical school, and Stanford for his residency in adult psychiatry and fellowship in adolescent psychiatry. He is the author of "The Anti-Depressant Book," available on Amazon. He currently serves on the Adjunct Faculty at Stanford University School of Medicine. He enjoys seeing patients, snowboarding, scuba diving, traveling, reading fantasy novels, meditating, spending quality time with other humans, making gratuitously long lists, and writing about himself in the third person. More information can be found at www.jacobtowerymd.com

  • Ranak Trivedi

    Ranak Trivedi

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEnhancing the role of informal caregivers in chronic disease self-management; assessment and treatment of mental illness in primary care settings; psychosocial antecedents and consequences of cardiovascular disease.

  • Mickey Trockel

    Mickey Trockel

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioMickey Trockel is the Director of Evidence Based Innovation for the Stanford University School of Medicine WellMD Center. His development of novel measurement tools has led to growing focus on professional fulfillment as a foundational aim of efforts to promote physician well-being. His scholarship also identifies interpersonal interactions at work as a modifiable core determinate of an organizational culture that cultivates wellness.

    Dr. Trockel serves as the chair of the Physician Wellness Academic Consortium Scientific Board, which is a group of academic medical centers working together to improve physician wellbeing. The consortium sites have adopted the physician wellness assessment system Dr. Trockel and his colleagues have developed, which offers longitudinal data for benchmarking and natural experiment based program evaluation. His previous research included focus on college student health, and evaluation of the efficacy of a national evidence based psychotherapy dissemination effort. His more recent scholarship has focused on physician wellbeing. He is particularly interested in developing and demonstrating the efficacy of interventions designed to promote wellbeing by improving social culture determinants of wellbeing across student groups, employee work teams, or larger organizations.

  • Yuri Tsutsumi

    Yuri Tsutsumi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Psychology

  • Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Jason Tucciarone, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioJason Tucciarone MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor with Stanford School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. As a neuroscientist, he leads a lab interested in biological mechanisms of mental illness and investigating new therapies for mood disorders and addiction. In particular, he is defining new cell types and evolutionary conserved circuits in emotional processing centers of the brain, with the hope of finding new entry points for novel therapeutics. Working with Dr Robert Malenka, he is using optogenetic, chemogenetic, neuroimaging and behavioral approaches in mouse models of addiction to uncover vulnerable brain circuitry in opioid use disorder. Alongside Dr Alan Schatzberg, he is investigating the efficacy of buprenorphine augmentation to IV ketamine infusion at reducing suicidality in treatment resistant depression.

    Clinically, he works collaboratively in the department’s Neuropsychiatry clinic and his clinical focus includes treating patients with diverse and complex presentations at the interface of psychiatry and neurology with particular interest in functional neurological disorders. He sees a small cohort of psychotherapy patients in Individual Psychotherapy Clinic. He also works weekend shifts on Stanford’s inpatient psychiatry units.

    Prior to training in psychiatry at Stanford’s research residency track Jason received his bachelor’s degree in biology and philosophy from Union College. He spent three years as a Post-Baccalaureate IRTA fellow at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke investigating and developing MRI reportable contrast agents to map neuronal connectivity. Following this he entered the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) at the State University of NY Stony Brook University. There he completed a doctoral dissertation in neuroscience under the mentorship Dr. Josh Huang at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. His thesis work employed mouse genetic dissections of excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits with a focus on the circuitry of chandelier inhibitory interneurons in prefrontal cortex.

    In addition to his research and clinical work, Jason is passionate about teaching, mentorship, and resident clinical supervision. He joined a working group early in his clinical residency to restructure trainee’s neuroscience education. He teaches introductory lectures in the neuroscience of addiction, PTSD, psychosis, and mood disorders. He also leads resident group supervision in their introductory psychodynamic psychotherapy clinical experience. He supervises medical students, residents, and clinical fellows in Neuropsychiatry clinic. Finally, committed to the Stanford clinical community, he leads a support group for Internal Medicine interns and residents.

  • Mirko Uljarevic

    Mirko Uljarevic

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioI am a medically trained researcher focused academic with a background in developmental psychopathology, psychometrics and big data science. My research takes a life-span perspective and is driven by the urgent need to improve outcomes for people with autism and other neuropsychiatric (NPD) disorders and neurodevelopmental conditions (NDD). My primary research interest has focused on combining cutting-edge psychometric procedures and a big data approach to better understand structure of clinical phenotypes across autism and other NPD and NDD and on using this knowledge to improve existing and develop new clinical assessments that are more effective for screening and diagnosis, tracking the natural and treatment-related symptom progression and for use in genetic and neurobiological studies. In addition to my focus on the development of outcome measures, I have collaborated with leading psychopathology researchers and groups in the United States, Europe and Australia on numerous projects spanning a range of topics including genetics, treatment and employment, with a particular focus on understanding risk and resilience factors underpinning poor mental health outcomes in adolescents and adults. Most recently, through several competitively funded projects, I have led the statistical analyses to uncover the latent structure of social and communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRB) clinical phenotypes across NPD and NDD. These findings have enabled us to (i) start capturing and characterizing a highly variable social functioning phenotype across a range of disorders and understanding mechanisms underpinning this variability, (ii) combine phenotypic and genetic units of analyses to advance our understanding of the genetic architecture of RRB, and (iii) focus on identification and characterization of subgroups of individuals that share distinct symptom profiles and demonstrate clinical utility and neurobiological validity. Importantly, this work has provided key information for developing a programmatic line of research aimed at developing novel, comprehensive assessment protocols that combine parent and clinician reports, objective functioning indicators and incorporate state-of-the-art psychometric, mobile and connected technologies and procedures.

    I am a co-director of the recently established Program for Psychometrics and Measurement-Based Care (https://med.stanford.edu/sppmc.html) that aims to bring together world-leading expertise in clinical science, psychometrics, and big data analytics to bridge the gap between the science of measurement development and clinical practice and bring improvements to both clinical care and research.

  • Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComplex behavioral and neuropsychiatric phenotypes often have a strong genetic component. This genetic component is often extremely complex and difficult to dissect. The current revolution in genome technology means that we can avail ourselves to tools that make it possible for the first time to begin understanding the complex genetic and epigenetic interactions at the basis of the human mind.

  • Keara E. Valentine

    Keara E. Valentine

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioKeara E. Valentine, Psy.D., is a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Psychosocial Treatment Clinic and OCD Clinic, where she specializes in the assessment and treatment of OCD and related disorders. Dr. Valentine utilizes behavioral-based therapies including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) with children, adolescents, and adults experiencing anxiety-related disorders.

    Dr. Valentine completed an APA accredited pre-doctoral internship at Alexian Brothers Behavioral Health Hospital, where she complete a rotation in OCD and anxiety disorders and a rotation in Eating Disorders. Dr. Valentine has experience working with individuals with OCD, anxiety, and/or eating disorders at various levels of care including outpatient, partial hospitalization, residential, and inpatient.

  • Peter Johannes van Roessel

    Peter Johannes van Roessel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Peter van Roessel, MD PhD, completed his MD at Stanford University and his residency training in psychiatry at Columbia University and the New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, with additional training in psychodynamic psychotherapy (TFP) via the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Prior to joining the clinical faculty at Stanford, he worked for several years as Associate Director of the general research unit of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, a premier state-funded research hospital affiliated with Columbia University.

    At Stanford, Dr. van Roessel sees adult mood and anxiety disorders outpatients through the Assessment Clinics and participates in resident training and patient care as director of the resident Continuity Clinic and as a supervisor in psychodynamic psychotherapy. He additionally directs the third-year resident curriculum in psychopathology and psychopharmacology. As a member of the department's Rodriguez Translational Therapeutics Lab, he sees individuals with obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders for evaluations and research-protocol driven clinical treatment and contributes to and leads clinical neuroscience studies pioneering rapid-acting interventions in OCD. Clinically motivated research interests include the nature and neural correlates of metacognitive ‘awareness’ (insight) in OCD and related disorders, and particularly the relationship of awareness to mechanisms of attentional control.

    Dr. van Roessel pursued research training in basic neuroscience prior to his clinical training, completing an MPhil in Biology via the Open University, UK, for research performed at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen Germany, and a PhD in molecular and developmental neurobiology at the University of Cambridge, UK. He has contributed to work in the lab of Dr Julia Kaltschmidt (Stanford) on studies of GABAergic/Glutamatergic interneuronal circuity in mouse. He received a 2018 NARSAD Young Investigator Award to pursue study of nitrous oxide as a rapid-acting treatment for OCD, he was a 2020-2022 Miller Foundation Fellow, and from 2020 to 2022 was a Advanced Fellow in Mental Illness Treatment and Research via the Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center of the Palo Alto VA. Dr. van Roessel is a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a member of the American College of Psychiatrists.

  • Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMental illness is the greatest thief of human potential today. By harnessing the power of medicine, entrepreneurship, and technology, we can return that potential to the 2 billion people suffering around the world.

    Brainstorm is the world's first academic laboratory dedicated to transforming mental health through innovation and entrepreneurship.

  • Allison Vreeland

    Allison Vreeland

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioDr. Allison Vreeland (she/her) is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in working with children, teens, and families. Dr. Vreeland received her PhD in Clinical Psychological Science with a minor in Quantitative Studies at Vanderbilt University. She completed her predoctoral clinical internship in Child Psychology at UCSF with specialty training through the Child Trauma Research Program. She completed a research and clinical fellowship in the Immune Behavioral Health Clinic at Stanford University, where she focused her research efforts on examining neurological markers of patients diagnosed with pediatric acute neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Clinically, Dr. Vreeland’s program of clinical care is focused on the delivery of evidence-based clinical interventions for individuals with anxiety, OCD, PANS/PANDAS, mood disorders, and behavioral challenges.

  • Lynn C. Waelde, Ph.D.

    Lynn C. Waelde, Ph.D.

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioLynn C. Waelde, Ph.D. is an Adjunct Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine and Professor Emeritus in the Psychology Department at Palo Alto University. Dr. Waelde’s many collaborative publications address the impacts of traumatic events and ways to use mindfulness and meditation to promote resilience and recovery from stress and trauma. She founded and directed the Inner Resources Center which offered intervention groups and trainings to thousands of participants, clients, and therapists over the past 15 years. Dr. Waelde is the author of Mindfulness and Meditation in Trauma Treatment: The Inner Resources for Stress Program, published in 2022. She has taken a special interest in family caregivers and the Inner Resources for Stress program has been named a Best Practice by the Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging. She recently coauthored Family Caregiver Distress, which is forthcoming in 2023. She is on the editorial board of Journal of Traumatic Stress and an Associate Editor of Mindfulness.

  • Dennis Wall

    Dennis Wall

    Professor of Pediatrics (Clinical Informatics), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSystems biology for design of clinical solutions that detect and treat disease

  • Po Wang

    Po Wang

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBipolar Disorders, Psychopharmacology, Treatment, Anticonvulsants, Mood stabilizers

  • Kathleen Watson

    Kathleen Watson

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioKathleen Watson, Ph.D., currently serves as an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, specializing in Epidemiology and Clinical Research. She co-founded Microclinic International in 2007, where she served as Chief Operating Officer until 2012, focusing on socially-based health interventions for underserved communities.

    Dr. Watson's research encompasses various aspects of mental health and metabolism. She investigates the connection between insulin resistance and depression, using computational psychiatry to uncover insights into the interplay of metabolic factors in mental well-being. Additionally, her exploration of cognitive aging examines how metabolic alterations might impact cognitive decline and related disorders. Furthermore, her research in proteomics aims to identify potential biomarkers for severe major depressive disorder. Dr. Watson has recently become a part of the Stanford Autism Center for Excellence Data Core, where she works under the guidance of Dr. Booil Jo.

  • Aileen Whyte

    Aileen Whyte

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioDr. Aileen Whyte, a licensed psychologist in California, brings over two decades of specialized expertise to the treatment of eating disorders in young people. Beyond her clinical practice, Dr. Whyte actively works on implementing strategies to expand the reach of evidence-based treatments for eating disorders, aiming to make these best-practice interventions more accessible to a wider population.

    Dr Whyte serves as the Director of the Stanford Outpatient Child & Adolescent Eating Disorders Clinic, where she provides treatment to young people with eating disorders and provides supervision to psychology and psychiatry fellows. Dr Whyte is a certified practitioner and consultant in Family-Based Treatment (FBT) for eating disorders. She serves as a study therapist in NIMH-sponsored randomized clinical trials focused on examining FBT and related adaptations.

    In addition to her clinical responsibilities, Dr. Whyte has led multiple seminars, workshops, and training sessions dedicated to the treatment of eating disorders. She provides ongoing training and consultation in FBT, reaching diverse audiences, including multidisciplinary clinicians, psychologists, and psychiatrists, within the US and internationally.

    Dr. Whyte earned her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the New School for Social Research in New York. Her research and clinical interests converge on the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based treatments for eating disorders.

  • Leanne Williams

    Leanne Williams

    Vincent V.C. Woo Professor, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA revolution is under way in psychiatry. We can now understand mental illness as an expression of underlying brain circuit disruptions, shaped by experience and genetics. Our lab is defining precision brain circuit biotypes for depression, anxiety and related disorders. We integrate large amounts of brain imaging, behavioral and clinical data and computational approaches. Biotypes are used in personalized intervention studies with selective drugs, neuromodulation and exploratory therapeutics.

  • Nolan Williams

    Nolan Williams

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    BioNolan Williams, M.D. is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab. The long-term goals of his research program are to develop innovative technologies and therapeutics capable of modulating the neural circuitry disrupted in mood disorders, OCD, and other neuropsychiatric conditions. His team has been developing neuroimaging-based approaches to precisely target therapeutic delivery and predict treatment responses to therapeutic neuromodulation and psychedelics. Dr. Williams earned his M.D. and completed his dual residencies in neurology and psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Triple board-certified in general neurology, general psychiatry, as well as behavioral neurology and neuropsychiatry, Dr. Williams brings a comprehensive background in clinical neuroscience to his role as a clinically active neuropsychiatrist. His expertise extends to the development and implementation of novel therapeutics, including devices and novel compounds, for central nervous system illnesses.
    Over the past decade, Dr. Williams’ laboratory alongside collaborators at Stanford University have pioneered multiple novel therapeutic and human neuroscience approaches. Notably, Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy (SAINT) is the world's first non-invasive, rapid-acting neuromodulation approach for treatment-resistant depression. SAINT received FDA Breakthrough Device Designation Status (2021) and FDA Clearance (2022) and is the first psychiatric treatment to be covered by Medicare New Technology Add-On Payment (NTAP). As of April 2024, SAINT has been reimbursed for patients suffering from severe depression within inpatient psychiatric units. The SAINT technology is being deployed both clinically and in research protocols in laboratories and hospitals worldwide. Dr. Williams also has an expertise in psychedelic medicines for neuropsychiatric illness and is the first investigator to conduct mechanistic clinical trials exploring the neurobiological effects of ibogaine.
    His research accomplishments have garnered international recognition, earning prestigious awards from the Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disorders Consortium, One Mind Institute, Wellcome Leap Foundation, International Brain Stimulation Conference, National Institute of Mental Health (Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists), Society of Biological Psychiatry (A. E. Bennett Award), along with multiple awards from the Brain Behavior Research Foundation (most notably the Gerald L. Klerman Award). His work has been featured in Scientific American, The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, CBS Sunday Morning, and the TODAY Show.

  • Sharon E. Williams PhD

    Sharon E. Williams PhD

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Williams’ work focuses primarily on cognitive and emotional recovery of children who have been medically compromised. With improved medical treatment and increased survival rates comes the need to better understand the challenges that patients face following a life threatening illness or injury. Dr. Williams utilizes neuropsychological assessments to understand the cognitive abilities of children who have been diagnosed with cancer, head injuries, genetic disorders and other medical conditions.

  • Helen Wilson

    Helen Wilson

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Wilson is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise on the effects of trauma across the lifespan. She provides clinical services for children, adolescents, adults, and families affected by trauma and other forms of anxiety and stress. Dr. Wilson also leads an active research program focused on relationships between childhood trauma and health risk behavior in adolescence and adulthood. She is the Principal Investigator of GIRLTALK: We Talk, a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) that examines links from childhood violence exposure to dating violence and sexual risk in young women from low-income communities in Chicago. Dr. Wilson has authored or co-authored thirty journal articles and book chapters related to these topics, and she regularly presents her work at local and national conferences. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

  • Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overarching goal of my program of research is to determine how to facilitate access to evidence-based psychosocial interventions (EBPs) in community and public sector mental health settings. Areas of emphasis include training and consultation, treatment fidelity and adaptation, AI and digital mental health interventions, and the identification of strategies that promote sustained implementation of EBPs.

  • Britt Wray

    Britt Wray

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Wray is the Director of CIRCLE at Stanford Psychiatry, a research and action initiative focused on Community-minded Interventions for Resilience, Climate Leadership and Emotional wellbeing in the Stanford School of Medicine. Before this she was a Human and Planetary Health Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Her research focuses on the mental health impacts of climate change on young people ('emerging adults') and frontline community members, community-minded psychosocial support interventions, and public engagement for improved mental and planetary health. She is the author of two books; her latest Generation Dread: Finding Purpose in an Age of Climate Anxiety, is an impassioned generational perspective on how to stay sane amid climate disruption and was a finalist for the 2022 Governor General’s Award. She is the recipient of the 2023 Canadian Eco-Hero Award and top award winner of the National Academies Eric and Wendy Schmidt Awards for Excellence in Science Communications, given by The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Her first book is Rise of the Necrofauna: The Science, Ethics and Risks of De-Extinction (Greystone Books 2017) and was named a "best book of the year" by The New Yorker. Dr Wray holds a PhD in Science Communication from the University of Copenhagen. She has hosted and produced several science radio programs, podcasts and television programs for international broadcasters including the BBC and CBC, and she has spoken at TED and the World Economic Forum. She is the Founder of Gen Dread (gendread.substack.com), a newsletter about building courage and taking meaningful action on the far side of climate grief.