School of Medicine


Showing 701-750 of 900 Results

  • Peter Sarnow

    Peter Sarnow

    Burt and Marion Avery Professor of Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

  • Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr. Sarnquist focuses on applied teaching and research on the development, implementation and evaluation of interventions to decrease gender-based violence and prevent HIV infection, especially among adolescents and children. She is particularly interested in rights-based approaches that tackle the complex interplay of factors that lead to poor health for many children and families. All of her work is applied, with direct links health practice and policy, and usually performed in conjunction with non-governmental organization and government partners. She works both globally and in the U.S., with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. She is also a medical educator, directing the scholarly concentrations program of the pediatric residency at Stanford, and co-directing the global health concentration for residents

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

  • Andrew Saunders

    Andrew Saunders

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Saunders (he/him) is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics, and the medical director of the Pediatric Hospitalist Program at SHC Tri-Valley. His academic interests include diversity, equity, and inclusion in medicine; LGBTQIA+ health; ethics in technology; global health; medical education; public health; and physician wellness.

  • Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Sayed Laboratory is focused on the development of novel technologies that drive innovation in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug testing in vascular biology. The lab conducts translational research in vascular biology and aims to understand the role of the vasculature in the development of cardiac diseases, including those due to inherited genetic variants or environmental insults such as type 2 diabetes or hypertension. The lab employs the human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to generate patient-specific vascular cells (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells) as an alternative to animal models providing a human tissue surrogate for research that is scalable and sustainable. By employing this unique platform, the lab also investigates the role of chemotherapeutic agents (anti-cancer drugs) on the vasculature. Dr. Sayed’s lab has also established an endothelial regeneration program, where they leverage the innate immune system to regenerate endothelial cells from human fibroblasts.

    Work from the lab has led to seminal discoveries in the areas of 1) Nitric oxide (NO) biology, (2) vascular biology, (3) stem cell biology, (4) cardiovascular disease modeling (5) cardio-oncology.

  • Lidia Schapira

    Lidia Schapira

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Schapira is a medical oncologist with clinical expertise in the treatment of breast cancer. As the inaugural Director of Stanford's Cancer Survivorship Program, she has developed a thriving research and clinical program focused on optimizing health outcomes for people living with and beyond cancer. Dr. Schapira is interested in training future generations of physician-scientists as well as the broader community of practicing physicians through the design of innovative educational programs. Dr. Schapira's advocacy for people with cancer led to her appointment as Editor-in-Chief of the American Society of Clinical Oncology's website for the public,Cancer.Net, a position she held from 2015 until-2021. She served on the Board of Directors of the American Psychosocial Oncology Society and as Chair of the Psychosocial Interest Group of the Multinational Society for Supportive Care in Cancer. Dr. Schapira is particularily committed to reducing inequities in cancer outcomes and improve access to cancer care and cancer clinical trials. Dr. Schapira has published numerous manuscripts, lectures both nationally and internationally on issues of cancer survivorship and served as Associate Editor of the narrative section, Art of Oncology, for the Journal of Clinical Oncology from 2013 until 2023.

  • David Schneider

    David Schneider

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    On Partial Leave from 03/24/2024 To 10/23/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study innate immunity and microbial pathogenesis. We have been studying models for a variety of bacterial infections including: Listeria, Mycobacteria, Salmonella and Streptococcus as well as some fungi, malaria and viruses. Our current focus is to determine how we recover from infections.

  • Alan Schroeder

    Alan Schroeder

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Schroeder is the associate chief for research in the division of pediatric hospital medicine at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and a clinical professor in the division of hospital medicine and the division of critical care. His research interests focus on identifying areas where we can “safely do less” in healthcare, striving to ensure that children get the healthcare that they need while avoiding excessive tests and treatments that only cause harm. Dr. Schroeder is currently involved in multiple projects involving common conditions and interventions in pediatrics. He serves as the Stanford PI for PEDSNet and is an Associate Editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics. At Stanford he co-leads the residency clinical research scholarly concentration and the faculty Clinical Research Peer Scholarship Community. Dr. Schroeder provides clinical care for children in the PICU and the pediatric ward.

  • Matthew P. Scott

    Matthew P. Scott

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research has been focused on the genetic regulation of animal development and its relation to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We studied mechanisms and functions of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which controls cell fates and growth, in the context of normal development and brain cancer. We studied a neurodegenerative disease, Niemann-Pick C syndrome, that affects intracellular organelle movements and sterol homeostasis. Due to Dr. Scott's new job, the lab is no longer active.

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Associate Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Adjunct Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioDr. Sellers is a pediatric physician-scientist and research and clinical development consultant. As a pediatric gastroenterologist and ion channel physiologist, Dr. Sellers' work in academia and pharma over the last 20 years has focused on improving the lives of individuals with complex and rare diseases through providing cutting-edge clinical care and advancing research and drug development. Dr. Sellers previously led a basic and translational research laboratory at Stanford, focused on epithelial ion transport and acid-base regulation using a variety of human and animal models. He is a firm believer in the exponential impact of team science and is adept working in multi-disciplinary and cross-functional teams. He seeks out strategic partnerships and opportunities that can leverage his expertise and leadership to advance innovative therapies for areas of high unmet need and to support the development of the next generation of physician-scientists. Dr. Sellers received his BS (Animal Physiology and Neuroscience) and BA (Japanese Studies) from the University of California. San Diego, his MD and PhD (Molecular and Integrative Physiology) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and was trained in Pediatrics and Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition at Stanford, where he was previously a faculty member and attending physician. He held multiple leadership positions at Stanford, including Associate Chief of Research in Gastroenterology, Director of the Stanford Children's Pancreas Program, Lead Gastroenterologist for the CF Program, Director of the CFTR Phenotyping and Theratyping Program, and Physician-Scientist Advisor for the Pediatrics Residency Program.

  • Ami J. Shah

    Ami J. Shah

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioI joined Stanford University in 2015 as a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology/ Oncology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, having completed my training in Pediatric Hematology/ Oncology at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. My areas of clinical expertise have been in the areas of transplantation for immune deficiencies and immune reconstitution post HSCT. I have been actively involved with the care and treatment of children with primary immune deficiencies and work with the Primary Immune Deficiencies Consortium (PIDTC). I am very interested in cellular therapies as a treatment modality for rare genetic diseases. I currently am the PI for several gene therapy trials at Stanford for various disorders including cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (cALD), Sickle Cell Anemia, Thalassemia and Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency. My other main areas of research have been in studying the late effects of patients following stem cell transplantation, in specific the neurocognitive function post HSCT. I have been involved with several national committees addressing the late effects of HSCT within the ASBMT and COG.

    In addition to my research work in stem cell transplantation, I have been actively involved with mentorship and graduate medical education. I am currently the Program Director for the Hematology/ Oncology Fellowship and serve as a mentor through the Pediatric Mentoring Group.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe answer clinical questions using aggregate patient data at the bedside. The Informatics Consult Service (https://greenbutton.stanford.edu/) put this idea in action and led to the creation of Atropos Health. We build predictive models that allow taking mitigating actions, keeping the human in the loop.

  • Sejal Shah

    Sejal Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary research interest is evaluating whether vitamin D supplementation can positively affect consequences of the metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adolescents. Other research interests include evaluating the efficacy and biochemical profiles of various types of estrogen replacement in adolescent females.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Jonathan Shaw

    Jonathan Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary care, psycho-social determinants of health & care, maternal-child health

  • Kate Shaw, MD MS

    Kate Shaw, MD MS

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    On Leave from 07/22/2024 To 08/23/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include expanding access to and and improving patient experience with contraception and abortion care both domestically and globally. I am also interested in medical education and resilience among physicians and trainees.

  • Xinshu She

    Xinshu She

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interests include global mental health promotion in underserved pediatric populations, including refugee health in US-Mexico borders, minority mental health in the US, and parental mental health in low-middle-income countries. I am also interested in physician wellness and Diversity and Inclusion.

  • Kevin Shea

    Kevin Shea

    Chambers-Okamura Endowed Professor of Pediatric Orthopaedics

    BioKevin G. Shea, MD is an orthopaedic surgeon at Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. Dr. Shea grew up in Montana and California, graduated from the UCLA School of Medicine, and completed his orthopaedic residency at the University of Utah School of Medicine. His advanced training includes pediatric orthopaedics at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego, AO Fellowship in Bern Switzerland with Drs. Ganz (Hip), Dr. Diego Fernandez (Trauma), and Dr. Hans Staubli (sports), and Ilizarov Training in Lecco, Italy. He was the AOSSM Traveling Sports Medicine Fellow in 2008, and practiced in Boise, ID prior to joining the Stanford Faculty. Dr. Shea is a founding member of the PRiSM Society (Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine), the ROCK (Research in OsteoChondritis of the Knee) Multi-center Study Group, and the SCORE prospective cohort registry for pediatric sports arthroscopy outcomes, complications. He is a member of the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons), POSNA (Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America) and the AOSSM (American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine). In addition, Dr. Shea has authored more than 240 scientific papers and book chapters.

  • Kunj Sheth

    Kunj Sheth

    Assistant Professor of Urology

    BioDr. Kunj Sheth is a pediatric urologist who focuses on minimally-invasive approaches to children’s surgery and treatment of complex patients. She is currently in the Biodesign Faculty Fellows Program. Her research focuses on the design and development of health technology specifically for children. She is also working to improve surgical education for residents through 3-dimensional modeling for minimally-invasive surgery. She is a part of the UCSF-Stanford Pediatric Device Consortium. Kunj graduated from Northwestern University with an undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering. She attended Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and completed a Urology residency training program at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. She then completed a fellowship in Pediatric Urology at Baylor College of Medicine - Texas Children's Hospital.

  • Hiroyuki Shimada

    Hiroyuki Shimada

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics

    BioHiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD, FRCPA (Hon), is Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center. He was born in Tokyo, Japan, and completed MD (1973) and PhD (1982) at the Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan, and also completed his pathology training at the Children's Hospital (now the Nationwide Children’s Hospital) and the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (1988). Before moving to the Stanford University in 2019, he was Professor of Pathology (Clinical Scholar) at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and working at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.
    Dr. Shimada was Chair of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (1999-2017) and the founder of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). As Director of the COG (Children’s Oncology Group) Neuroblastoma Pathology Reference Laboratory (since 2001), he has been actively reviewing pathology samples of ~700 neuroblastoma cases per year from United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Pathology review results according to the INPC have been providing critical information for patient stratification and protocol assignment in the COG international neuroblastoma clinical trials.

  • Andrew Young Shin

    Andrew Young Shin

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSURF PROGRAM
    The SURF program is an innovative collaboration between LPCH, Stanford University Hospital and the Stanford School of Engineering. The program has focused on improving quality and safety of patient care, improving hospital operations and promoting clinical effectiveness utilizing contemporary technologies such as machine learning, mathematical optimization, simulation and a variety of statistical, probabilistic and computational tools. The program has 2 independent funding mechanism to primarily improve patient care/hospital operations and improve academics for faculty within the department of Pediatrics at LPCH.

    https://surf.stanford.edu/


    CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
    The Clinical Effectiveness (CE) Program is a funded program that aims to understand and improve unnecessary variation in healthcare delivery in order to optimize quality of care and reduce wasteful expenditures. The CE program has developed innovative programs such as Target Based Care, an award-winning intervention to reduce variation in hospital length of stay and currently a multi-center trial involving more than 20 hospitals in North America. In 2016, the CE program included the first CE fellowship program in a pediatric training program with 3 cycles of graduates. The CE program is supported by LPCH and a philanthropic gift by Susan Choe and Thomas Tobiason.

  • Jade Shorter, MD, MSHP

    Jade Shorter, MD, MSHP

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

    BioDr. Shorter specializes in complex family planning, early pregnancy management, and general gynecology. She is committed to improving the continuity of care for patients with early pregnancy complications and serves as the Director of the Early Pregnancy Assessment Program. Her clinical research interests include improving patients’ experience with abortion and early pregnancy care, addressing reproductive health disparities, and promoting health equity.

  • Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe timing for intervention in obstruction in the infant and child is poorly understood.Our group has been interested in trying to define the risks that may be involved in obstructive and infectious uropathies and discovering early signs of damage to the urinary tract and kidney. We have explored ways of imaging the urinary tract using nonionizing radiation (US, MRI). We have studied the relationships of sex steroid hormones, pregnancy, reflux, urinary tract infection and urinary tract function.

  • Ann Shue, MD

    Ann Shue, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    Bio**Dr. Shue is taking new patients for glaucoma, cataracts, and adult strabismus.**

    Ann Shue, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she specializes in glaucoma, pediatric ophthalmology, and adult strabismus, a unique combination of subspecializations practiced by few surgeons worldwide. She is a board-certified ophthalmologist who completed fellowships in glaucoma at Yale University and pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus at Duke University. She practices at the Stanford Byers Eye Institute and the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

    Dr. Shue loves seeing patients of all ages with eye problems big or small, including glaucoma due to any reason, glaucoma suspicion, family history of glaucoma, cataracts, strabismus (eye misalignment) or double vision from any cause, including after eye surgeries. She completed her ophthalmology residency at the University of Pittsburgh and an internal medicine internship at UCSF Fresno. She holds a medical degree from University of California, Irvine and an undergraduate degree in biology from Yale University.

    Dr. Shue is a member of the American Glaucoma Society, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, and the UK Paediatric Glaucoma Society. She is active in presenting at regional and national conferences. She is the author of several journal articles and recently wrote two textbook chapters on pediatric glaucoma and pediatric glaucoma surgery.

  • Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Regulation of Intestinal Development and Maturation. We study transcriptional mechanisms regulating the spatial and temporal restriction of intestine-specific gene expression during gut development. Our approach is to characterize the function of gene-specific DNA cis elements and interacting nuclear proteins in cell culture and in transgenic animals. The goal is to relate the gene-specific control mechanisms to the broader pathways specifying acquisition of gut phenotypes.

  • Douglas Sidell, MD

    Douglas Sidell, MD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Sidell's clinical interests include the management of children with voice and swallowing disorders, and congenital or acquired airway abnormalities. Examples of ongoing or upcoming prospective trials include an investigation into the utility of acid suppression in children with laryngomalacia, the management of vocal cord paralysis following cardiac surgery, and the management of type 1 laryngeal clefts in children.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 02/21/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Clinical Professor, Dermatology
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm dedicated to connecting patients with clinical research trials and contributing to research on specific skin conditions particularly hemangiomas, birthmarks, and PHACE syndrome. My research also aims to develop solutions to health disparities through improved access to pediatric dermatologists and treatments.

  • Oscar Silva

    Oscar Silva

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    BioOscar is an academic hematopathologist who completed anatomic and clinical pathology residency and hematopathology fellowship at Stanford in 2020. Prior to Stanford, he received his MD and PhD from UCLA. His interests include immunology, the pathogenesis and diagnosis of lymphomas, and global health.

  • Norman H. Silverman

    Norman H. Silverman

    Honorary Faculty Emeritus, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests center around cardiac ultrasound. I am currently working on several areas in the development of human cardiac ultrasound.

    These are fetal cardiac ultrasound. intraoperative and transesophageal ultrasound imaging in children, imaging potiential for ultrasound two and three dimensional modalities in children with congenital heart disease

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    BioJulia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology in Maternal Fetal Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Laura Simons

    Laura Simons

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and a clinical psychologist who evaluates and treats youth presenting with chronic pain in the Pediatric Pain Management Clinic (PPMC) at Stanford Children’s Health. My program of research aims to utilize a pain neuroscience psychology approach to gain a mechanistic understanding of cognitive and affective processes in pediatric pain, perform rigorous patient-oriented research that translates targeted assessment into mechanistically informed treatment approaches for optimal clinical care and leverage the ubiquity of digital health to enhance patient access and reach. Central to these goals are projects targeting adolescence and youth adults with chronic pain that encompass defining brain signatures of threat interpretation, evaluating the efficacy of graded exposure (NCT03699007), deriving a biosignature of improvement vs. persistence of pain and disability (NCT04285112), and evaluating the impact of virtual reality on pain rehabilitation (NCT04636177). These studies along with additional work examining the journey of pain care for youth with pain and their parents form a comprehensive research portfolio in the realm of understanding and treating chronic pain in young people. My long-term career goal is to lead a robust research program focusing on alleviating the suffering of youth and emerging adults with chronic pain.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Infectious Disease and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • Stephanie Melissa Smith

    Stephanie Melissa Smith

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am involved with clinical research related to cancer survivorship, with a particular focus on late effects of childhood cancer treatments and community partnerships to improve health equity for adolescent/young adult cancer survivors in under-resourced settings.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering, of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    BioDr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.