School of Medicine


Showing 141-150 of 163 Results

  • Alexis Thomas Weiner

    Alexis Thomas Weiner

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway polarizes animal cells along an axis parallel to the tissue plane, and in so doing generates long-range organization that can span entire tissues. Although its core proteins and much about their interactions are known, how PCP signaling occurs at a mechanistic level remains fundamentally mysterious. In my current project I will employ novel genetic methods to dissect the logic underlying how cellular asymmetry arises at a molecular level.

  • Jian Xiong

    Jian Xiong

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Chemical Engineering

    BioI thrive to understand the roles of lysosomes in physiological and pathological conditions. Lysosomes are both degradation compartment and metabolic controlling hub, and dysregulation of lysosomal functions are frequently implicated in a vast number of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, however, the systematic knowledge of the molecular mechanism by which lysosomal contributes to these diseases is lacking. Ion channels are the primary mediators of neuronal activity, defects in neuronal ion channel activity are linked with many kinds of neurodegenerative diseases. Interestingly, besides typical ion channels that are involved in the neuronal activity, defects in lysosomal ion channels, such as TRPML1, CLN7 and CLC-7 are also implicated in neuropathy. My previous work as Ph.D student in University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center focused on regulation of lysosomal function by ion channels and metabolites. I discovered a mechanism of lysosomal Na+ channel regulate mTORC1 activation by regulating lysosomal amino acid accumulation. I also discovered role of glutamine in controlling lysosomal degradation capacity. In the meantime, I developed novel methods to isolate organelles. My ultimate research goal is to understand the key developmental pathways and how alterations in gene sequences and expression contribute to human disease, therefore, I am pursuing independent academic researcher as my career goal. Starting Feb 2022, I work with Dr. Monther Abu-Remaileh at Stanford University on role of lysosomes in neurodegenerative diseases. I use genetics, chemical biology and omics approaches to study lysosome function under various physiological and pathological conditions, especially age-associated neurodegenerative disorders, and monogenic neurodegenerative lysosome storage diseases. In Stanford, I aim to integrate ionic regulation, metabolomic regulation and functional proteomic regulation to systematically understand the biology of lysosome in physiological conditions and pathological conditions.

  • Hao Yan

    Hao Yan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bone Marrow Transplantation

    BioAs a highly motivated researcher with a passion for conducting basic research that has direct implications for patient care, I have completed my Ph.D. training in physiology in China and pursued postdoctoral training in the United States. My academic training and research experience have provided me with an excellent background in multiple biological disciplines including developmental biology, gerontology, immunology, and pre-clinic research. As a doctoral student with Dr. Guoliang Xia, I focused on mammalian ovary development and aging with the goal of improving the in-vitro fertilization process for cancer patients and women over 40, and aimed to uncover the mechanisms that control the non-renewable oocyte activation and slow down its quantity and quality loss during aging.
    During my Ph.D. training, I became interested in immunology research, inspired by my involvement in a project on maternal-fetal immunotolerance. In naturally conceived pregnancies, the fetus is semi-allogeneic to the mother, and the maternal immune system is exposed to foreign HLA antigens from the child. However, the fetus is well-tolerated within a specific time window. As a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, I joined the lab of Dr. Robert Negrin, a renowned leader in the bone marrow transplantation (BMT)/GVHD field, to explore immunotolerance-related issues such as graft-versus-host disease and blood malignancies.

  • Astrid Nicole Zamora

    Astrid Nicole Zamora

    Postdoctoral Scholar, SCRDP/ Heart Disease Prevention

    BioDr. Astrid N. Zamora is a public health researcher and epidemiologist. Her work has utilized robust birth cohort data to examine associations between diet and environmental pollutants with sleep and metabolic health outcomes among adolescents and midlife women.

    Following her Master of Public Health degree at UC Berkeley School of Public Health, Dr. Zamora completed her PhD at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. As a doctoral trainee at Michigan, her dissertation research, funded by a Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research from NIH/NIEHS, focused on examining the interplay between exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, sleep, and metabolic health risk among pubertal adolescents and peri-menopausal women from Mexico City.

    As a current NHLBI T32 postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford University School of Medicine, Dr. Zamora is receiving training in RCT study design and citizen science methods, learning how to bridge her training in epidemiology with community-based research approaches, thereby ensuring that her research agenda maintains a meaningful connection to the community and its real-world context. The goal of her current research, bolstered by her previous and ongoing training, is to explore the interconnections between diet, the built environment, and physical activity. She is particularly focused on understanding how these factors relate to psychosocial and cardiometabolic health amongst Latinx communities across the life course.