School of Medicine


Showing 11-16 of 16 Results

  • Michele Lanpher Patel

    Michele Lanpher Patel

    Instructor, Medicine - Stanford Prevention Research Center

    BioMichele L. Patel, PhD is an Instructor at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on optimizing digital health interventions for treating obesity. She is particularly interested in improving engagement in these interventions and examining the impact of psychosocial factors on treatment success.

    Dr. Patel received a K23 career development award from NIH (2022-2027). This work investigates the most potent combination of self-monitoring strategies in a behavioral weight loss intervention for adults with overweight or obesity. Dr. Patel is interested in using digital tools such as commercial apps, wearables, text-messaging, and telehealth to improve access to and engagement in treatment.

    Dr. Patel received her BA in psychology from Duke University in 2010 and her PhD in clinical psychology from Duke in 2018. She completed her clinical internship at the VA Palo Alto, specializing in behavioral medicine, and her postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford Prevention Research Center.

    Primary Research Interests:
    -- Conducting clinical trials to evaluate digital health interventions for obesity
    -- Improving engagement in self-monitoring and other behavioral intervention strategies
    -- Examining the impact of psychosocial factors (e.g., health literacy, stress) on treatment success
    -- Applying the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) framework to efficiently construct behavioral interventions

  • Judith Prochaska

    Judith Prochaska

    Senior Associate Vice Provost, Clinical Research Governance and Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Prochaska's research expertise centers on technology-mediated health behavior change interventions including targets of tobacco, physical activity, and dietary change. Working with Alaska Native and Latino communities, people with serious mental illness, alcohol and drug problems, or heart disease, and jobseekers and the unhoused, Dr. Prochaska’s research combines stage-tailored interventions with pharmacotherapy and utilizes interactive expert system interventions and social media.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick’s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of “usual activity” controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women’s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, “wisdom”) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women’s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford’s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.

  • Marilyn Winkleby, PhD, MPH

    Marilyn Winkleby, PhD, MPH

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular disease epidemiology, health of socioeconomically disadvantaged and ethnic minority populations, social determinants of health, community-based intervention research, youth advocacy and mentorship, promoting diversity in health professions