School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 36 Results

  • Edgar Engleman

    Edgar Engleman

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegenerative disease and metabolic disease.

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control regulatory T cell (Treg) responsiveness by inhibiting the Treg IL-2 receptor desensitization. We have characterized a gene (Deaf1) that plays a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D. Using PBC gene expression, we have provisionally identified a signature of risk and progression in T1D.

  • Andrew Fire

    Andrew Fire

    George D. Smith Professor in Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study natural cellular mechanisms for adapting to genetic change. These include systems activated during normal development and those for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. Underlying these studies are questions of how a cells can distinguish information as "self" versus "nonself" or "wanted" versus "unwanted".

  • Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Stephen J. Galli, MD

    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease. We study both the roles of mast cells, basophils, and IgE in normal physiology and host defense, e.g., in responses to parasites and in enhancing resistance to venoms, and also their roles in pathology, e.g., anaphylaxis, food allergy, and asthma, both in mice and humans.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Aida¬†Habtezion MD MSc.

    Aida Habtezion MD MSc.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLeukocyte recruitment & immune responses in diseases affecting digestive organs

  • Laura Johnston

    Laura Johnston

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), more specifically, allogeneic transplantation and graft versus host disease. Exploring methods of improving prevention and treatment of GVHD as well as the long term follow-up and/or quality of life of affected patients.

  • Robert Lowsky

    Robert Lowsky

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lowsky's research is focused on understanding the role of regulatory T cells in the prevention of GVHD and in promoting immune tolerance following organ transplantation.

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRecent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that T cell based immunotherapy can eradicate cancers resistant to all other available therapies. Our program creates, develops and optimizes genetically engineered T cells to treat cancer. We link the bench with the bedside, developing novel therapies for early phase testing in clinical trials, while simultaneously conducting intensive studies on clinical samples obtained from patients treated on immunotherapy trials.

  • Robbie Majzner

    Robbie Majzner

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioRobbie Majzner is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. After graduating with a BA from Columbia University, Dr. Majzner attended Harvard Medical School, where he developed an interest in pediatric oncology. He completed his residency training in pediatrics at New York Presbyterian-Columbia and fellowship training in pediatric hematology-oncology at Johns Hopkins and the National Cancer Institute. During his fellowship, he cared for some of the first pediatric patients to receive CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, children with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) who often had no other therapeutic option. Witnessing the success of CAR T cells in these patients drove Dr. Majzner to the laboratory, where he focuses on extending the use of CAR T cells to solid tumors. He has generated and optimized novel receptors to recognize antigens over-expressed on pediatric solid tumors such as GD2 (Mount/Majzner et al., Nature Medicine, 2018) B7-H3 (Majzner et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019), and ALK (Walker/Majzner et al., Molecular Therapy, 2017). Current work focuses on imparting multi-specificity to CAR T cells and optimizing these receptors to enhance their efficacy when the amount of target (antigen density) is limiting (Majzner et al., Cancer Discovery, 2020). By drawing on state of the art bioengineering techniques, the Majzner Laboratory focuses on enhancing the potency and specificity of CAR T cells for children with cancer.

    Clinically, Dr. Majzner cares for all patients with neuroblastoma at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and has a specific interest in bringing novel immunotherapies to clinical trials for these patients and those with other solid tumors. He is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric hematology-oncology.