School of Medicine


Showing 201-278 of 278 Results

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    BioLisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement, Co-Director of Community-Engaged Research for the Office of Cancer Health Equity, and Director of the Outreach, Recruitment and Engagement Core for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Tracy Rydel

    Tracy Rydel

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioTracy Rydel is Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine where she holds the positions of Assistant Dean for Clerkship Education and Director, Core Clerkship in Family and Community Medicine. She has also served as the Director of Medical Student Education in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health, and was an Educator-4-CARE faculty from 2017-2020. She is a family physician with a passion for medical education. She completed the Rathmann Family Foundation Fellowship in Patient-centered Care and Medical Education in 2012, is part of the Peer Coaching Program under the Stanford Teaching and Mentoring Academy, and was the Director of the Practice of Medicine Year One Course at Stanford from 2013-2016. She emphasizes patient-centered care in the pursuit of clinical and educational excellence. She is frequently an invited presenter at the national conferences of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM), and the Western Group on Educational Affairs (WGEA) regional group of the AAMC; her scholarly work focuses on medical education endeavors, including the scrutiny of systems of medical education assessment for racial/ethnic- and gender-based disparities. She has also presented on topics in nutrition education and the teaching kitchen, working with medical scribes, Entrustable Professional Activities, primary care career recruitment and mentoring, procedures training, time management in ambulatory teaching, communication skills, virtual health and telehealth, and learning communities.

  • Rebecca Sands

    Rebecca Sands

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sands currently serves as the Clinical Section Chief of Palliative Care at Stanford University. She graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 2001 with a BA in Chemistry. She then attended Midwestern University, Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine from 2002-2006. She completed a residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance in Cambridge, MA and went on to complete her Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM) fellowship at the Harvard combined program at Massachusetts General Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute in 2011. She spent 8 years at the University of Pittsburgh where she served as core teaching faculty and the HPM Fellowship Program Director. Her clinical work has focused on the intersection of oncology and palliative care. Her primary interests are in mentorship and the advancement of palliative care within the structure of academic medicine including ambulatory practice. She has a particular focus on resiliency skill development for trainees, staff, and faculty as well a commitment to the innovation of ways to create meaning in our everyday lives as health care professionals.

  • Amelia Sattler, MD

    Amelia Sattler, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrently working on projects identifying effective use of actual patient encounters in undergraduate medical education. Specifically interested in the role of actual patient encounters in the training of shared decision making. Also interested in medical student empathy and physician wellness.

    Also working on many different projects in the realm of quality improvement and population health in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health.

  • Erika Schillinger

    Erika Schillinger

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy passion is clinical skills education: the patient's experience of health and healthcare, doctor-patient communication, professionalism and physical exam. I am focused on curriculum design and innovation, having helped develop the Continuity of Care Clerkship, the clinical skills curriculum in Practice of Medicine, the Family Medicine core clerkship, outpatient faculty development modules and the SHIELD course (Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive).

  • Rebecca Seekamp, MD

    Rebecca Seekamp, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterested in complementary/alternative medicine, international health, international adoption medicine and providing full spectrum health care.

  • Nirav R. Shah, MD, MPH

    Nirav R. Shah, MD, MPH

    Adjunct Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioNirav R. Shah, MD, MPH, is Senior Scholar at Stanford University’s School of Medicine. He is a distinguished healthcare leader with experience as an operator, scientist, innovator, and regulator. His expertise spans public health, public and private health insurance, and clinical operations across the continuum of care. At Stanford, Dr. Shah conducts research on improving healthcare quality and safety while lowering cost, driving adoption of digital technologies, and quantitatively evaluating the resulting value for US and international health care systems. Dr. Shah is Board-certified in Internal Medicine and is a graduate of Harvard College and Yale School of Medicine. He is an Advisor to the CDC Director, Senior Fellow of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), independent director of STERIS plc [NYSE:STE], and trustee of the John A. Hartford Foundation. Previously, he served as Chief Operating Officer of Kaiser Permanente in Southern California, and as Commissioner of the New York State Department of Health.

  • Christopher Sharp, MD

    Christopher Sharp, MD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Informatics
    Clinical Education
    Teaching Physical Examination
    Quality Improvement
    Preventive Medicine

  • Jonathan Shaw

    Jonathan Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary care, psycho-social determinants of health & care, maternal-child health

  • Meera Sheffrin

    Meera Sheffrin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeriatric education
    Implementation and evaluation of home-based care
    Improving care for older adults with dementia

  • Bansari Sureshchandra Sheth

    Bansari Sureshchandra Sheth

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sheth is originally from southern California, but has progressively moved up the coast over the last few years, now making the Bay Area her wonderful new home. Board certified in Family Medicine, she had comprehensive training during residency. She has a variety of special interests, including pediatric illnesses, women’s health, diabetes care including lifestyle management, as well as Hepatitis C treatment. She believes in empowering her patients, working together with them as a team. In her free time, Dr. Sheth enjoys yoga, going to plays or musicals, comedy shows, and hiking.

  • Takudzwa Shumba

    Takudzwa Shumba

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Takudzwa Shumba is a family medicine clinician-educator with particular interests in global health equity, preventative medicine, women's health, pediatrics and integrative medicine. She was born and raised in Zimbabwe. Prior to beginning medical school at Stanford, she completed a Master's in Public Health at Yale, with a focus in global health. She has been involved in public health projects in Zimbabwe, Hong Kong and mainland China and Kenya. She completed her residency at Stanford Health Care - O'Connor Hospital Family Medicine in San Jose, prior to joining faculty at Stanford Family Medicine. LGBTQQI friendly. After several years as a continuity primary care provider at Stanford Family Medicine, she transitioned to providing quality same day access for acute patient needs.

    She is currently Co-director of the Leadership Education in Advancing Diversity (LEAD) program, Associate Director of the Clinical Summer Internship (CSI), Course Director of the undergraduate seminar “Decolonizing Global Health,” and Co-Director of the "Social and Environmental Determinants of Health" elective. She is a California Health Care Foundation (CHCF) Fellow (2020-2022) and Presidential Leadership Scholar (2022). She previously served as the Primary Care and Population Health (PCPH) Division Global Health faculty lead and PCPH DEI faculty lead.

  • Kelley M. Skeff, MD, PhD

    Kelley M. Skeff, MD, PhD

    George DeForest Barnett Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and evaluation of improved teaching methods; assessment of teacher's attitudes toward their teaching role; study of clinical teaching; evaluation of alternative methods of learning in clinical clerkships (e.g. computer assisted instruction, video tape review, etc.).

  • Peter Michael Sklarin

    Peter Michael Sklarin

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sklarin practices endocrinology at Menlo Medical Clinic. He is a graduate of Harvard College, where he majored in biology. He attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, completed his internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and completed his endocrinology fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

    Dr. Sklarin is board certified in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism and treats patients with a wide variety of endocrine disorders. He has special expertise in thyroid ultrasound and ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration and directs the Menlo Clinic bone density center.

    In his free time Dr. Sklarin enjoys spending time with his family, playing tennis, running, biking, swimming, and doing triathlons.

  • Grant M. Smith, MD

    Grant M. Smith, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Grant Smith is a palliative care physician and Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine. He is the medical director of the Stanford Palliative Care Center of Excellence (PCCOE) Community Partnerships Team, and he is the lead for quality improvement in advance care planning in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. Dr. Smith graduated with a Bachelor of Science in psychology from Duke University. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He completed residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco with a focus in primary care, followed by a chief resident year at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. He subsequently completed his palliative care fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. As part of the Stanford faculty, he is an attending on the palliative care inpatient service and as a provider in the outpatient palliative care clinic in Palo Alto.

  • Malathi Srinivasan

    Malathi Srinivasan

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Srinivasan is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, Associate Director at the Stanford Center for Asian Healthcare Research and Education (Stanford CARE), Director of the Stanford CARE Scholars research program, Director of the Stanford Implementation Sciences Fellowship, Fellow at the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH), Board Member for the Stanford Health Professions Education and Scholars (SHaPES, formerly CTSS), and member of the Stanford Teaching and Mentoring Academy (TMA). She is co-Director of the One Health Teaching Scholars Faculty Development Program, an international program focusing on faculty development for health professions education around the world. She is a contributor to CBS-KPIX “Medical Mondays”. Dr. Srinivasan brings her skills as an educator, physician, health services researcher, and entrepreneur to considering how scalable technologies can improve health care. Her work in Virtual Health/telemedicine and new patient engagement models has been published in the NEJM Catalyst – a leading healthcare innovation journal.

    Previously, Dr. Srinivasan was a Master Clinical Educator and Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine. She was the Senior Associate Editor and Editorial Fellowship Director for the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and was the Kimitaka Kaga Visiting Professor at the University of Tokyo at the International Research Center for Medical Education. At UC Davis, Dr. Srinivasan was the Director of Practice Based Learning and Improvement and Medical Director of the Clinical Performance Examination for a decade. She is former President of the California-Hawaii Society of General Internal Medicine, and ex-officio National Council Member for SGIM. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar and US Health and Human Service Public Policy Fellow. Dr. Srinivasan has been awarded the California SGIM Educator of the Year Award, Mentor of the Year (California American College of Physicians), and Faculty of the Year (Stanford CARE), and was recognized with the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Education (UC Davis). Her research has focused on two themes. Fist, improving physician competency around clinical decision-making, through Virtual Health, technology-aided education and reflective practice. Second, addressing health disparities for vulnerable populations. She also pursues her interests in the Medical Humanities on the Executive Board of The Pegasus Physician Writers Program at Stanford and as Director of the Medicine, Movement and Dance program within Stanford's medical humanities program, Medicine and the Muse.

  • Jo-Anne Landry Suffoletto, MD

    Jo-Anne Landry Suffoletto, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Suffoletto is a primary care doctor at Stanford Internal Medicine Clinic. She is board certified in internal medicine.

    For each patient, Dr. Suffoletto prepares a care plan. Her goal is to help every individual achieve the best possible health and quality of life. Her care plans are customized, comprehensive, and compassionate.

    Patients praise Dr. Suffoletto‘s clinical skills and warm bedside manner. They value her ability to listen closely and communicate clearly.

    Her expertise and empathy are fundamental to her leadership as the medical director of the Stanford Coordinated Care (SCC) program. This program uses an interdisciplinary, team-based approach to enhance care for moderate- and high-risk patients throughout the Stanford Health Care system.

    Dr. Suffoletto also helps educate the internal medicine providers of the future. She is a clinical associate professor of primary care and population health in the Stanford Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care.

    To advance the field of internal medicine, she has published virtual patient cases, medical education curricula, and has given regional and national presentations on women’s health topics and medical education with a focus on simulation training.

    Prior to joining Stanford, she held positions as associate chief of staff for education and innovative learning and medical director of simulation education in the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and chief of staff at Butler VA Healthcare System in Pennsylvania.

  • Eric Sun

    Eric Sun

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines questions of health economics and health policy, with a focus on economics and policy in the perioperative setting. Current research topics include the economics of treatments for chronic pain, as well as how physician practice organization affects outcomes and costs.

  • Helen Sun

    Helen Sun

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical education in geriatrics and palliative medicine
    Advance care planning

  • Meg Tabaka, MD, MPH

    Meg Tabaka, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Tabaka is a board-certified family medicine physician with a special focus in LGBTQ+ and underserved medicine. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health of Stanford Department of Medicine. In this role, she splits her time between the Stanford Los Altos LGBTQ+ Primary Care Clinic and the MayView Community Clinic, a Federally Qualified Health Center in Mountain View, CA.

    Dr. Tabaka provides expert, compassionate care personalized to each patient she serves. She is dedicated to meeting the health care needs of all of her patients including all members of the LGBTQ+ community and she welcomes patients of all ages and backgrounds to her practice.

    Prior to her medical training, Dr. Tabaka completed her Masters in Public Health at the University of Minnesota. She went to complete medical school at Stanford University and completed residency at the Stanford O’Connor Family Medicine Residency Program in San Jose, CA.

  • Holly Tabor

    Holly Tabor

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care & Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Stanford Center of Biomedical Ethics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on ethical issues in genetics and genomics, specifically return of results and translation for exome and whole genome sequencing and translation of genomic sequencing into the clinical setting. I also conduct research on ethical issues in clinical care and research for patients and families with autism and other developmental and cognitive disabilities.

  • Valerie Teng

    Valerie Teng

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Valerie Teng is a board certified family physician with special interests in preventative medicine and women's health. Her experiences in caring for patients with chronic conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, have fueled her desire to partner with patients to enter healthier lifestyles. She is also passionate about providing comprehensive care to patients of all ages, including newborns and teens.

    During her residency training, Dr. Teng explored many opportunities in medical education through the O’Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) program. She is delighted to continue in medical education as a part of the faculty at Stanford Family Medicine.

  • Winifred Teuteberg

    Winifred Teuteberg

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Teuteberg completed residency training in Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago and a Palliative Medicine Fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. She joined the faculty at Stanford in 2017 and currently sees patients as a part of the inpatient palliative care consult team at Stanford Healthcare.

    She has been the clinical director or Stanford Medicine's implementation of the Ariadne Labs' Serious Illness Care Program since its inception in 2018. Her interests include communication skills training, leveraging predictive algorithms to identify patients who would most benefit from serious illness conversations, how to empower non-physician clinical team members to participate in this work, and best practice for EHR builds related to advance care planning.

  • Julie Ngoc Thai, MD, MPH

    Julie Ngoc Thai, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Thai is a fellowship-trained specialist in geriatric medicine. She provides care at the Stanford Senior Care Clinic.

    She completed her fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco. She is board-certified in family medicine through the American Board of Family Medicine .

    Dr. Thai earned her medical degree from Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. She completed her residency in family medicine at McLaren Flint/Michigan State University College of Human Medicine where she served as chief resident.

    She also holds a Master of Public Health degree from Columbia University.

    Dr. Thai has a background in clinical and population health research. She recently received a grant from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation to study the role of motivational interviewing in smoking cessation.

    She contributed to research in rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and ankylosing spondylitis in the Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine at Cedars Sinai Medical Center.

    Dr. Thai was also an endourology research fellow in the Department of Urology at Mount Sinai Health System. Research focused on renal stone disease, clinical markers and outcomes, and testing and development of new technologies.

    She has co-authored articles on topics such as caregivers’ communication with elders living with late-life disability, palliative care practices in diverse settings, and the social consequences of forgetfulness and Alzheimer’s disease. These articles appeared in the American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Mental Health Aging, and other peer-reviewed journals

    Dr. Thai is a member of the American Geriatrics Society, American Academy of Family Physicians, and California Academy of Family Physicians. She is also an inductee of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

    She has volunteered with homeless shelters, women’s advocacy groups, Goodwill, the American Red Cross, and AmeriCorps.

    Dr. Thai is fluent in English and proficient in speaking Vietnamese.

  • De Tran

    De Tran

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioI would like to use the office visits as opportunities to engage the patients in participating in managing their well-being, and to bring them world-class Stanford Health Care.

  • Cynthia Tsai, MD

    Cynthia Tsai, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Cynthia Tsai, MD, is a board certified internal medicine physician who practices at Stanford Primary Care in Los Altos. She also serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Stanford within the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. She completed medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, and she completed residency training in internal medicine and primary care in the UCSF Primary Care/General Internal Medicine (UCPC-GIM) track of the Internal Medicine residency program. A Bay Area native, she is eager to provide primary care for a complex patient panel here in the Bay Area. Her clinical interests include preventative healthcare, the care of older adults, addiction medicine, and behavioral medicine. She grew up in a bicultural and bilingual home and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese, and she provides language concordant care to Mandarin speaking patients. Outside of patient care, she has interests in ambulatory medical education and the cultivation of early trainee interest in primary care. She also has strong interest in the medical humanities and narrative medicine, and has published personal perspective pieces in publications such as JAMA and the San Francisco Chronicle.

  • Timothy Tsai

    Timothy Tsai

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Tsai is a board-certified family medicine physician, clinical informaticist, and trained in osteopathy. He is a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Medicine – Primary Care and Population Health. Prior to joining Stanford Health Care, he obtained a Master of Management in clinical informatics from Duke University.

    Dr. Tsai seeks to improve clinician workflows and patient care by applying his knowledge of clinical informatics. His innovations allow providers to quickly access, share, and document information to advance patient care. He has also held many notable leadership, educational, and quality control positions throughout his career.

    Dr. Tsai investigates ways to maximize the time clinicians spend with patients. He expedites and standardizes communication between health care providers and patients through the integration of mobile devices and remote patient monitoring programs. He streamlines the documentation process by updating electronic medical record tools and creating more efficient patient questionnaires to optimize the quality of care.

    He has presented his research orally or in poster format at the American Medical Informatics Association, Family Medicine Education Consortium, and American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine. As a medical student, Dr. Tsai developed an open online osteopathic manipulation course, enrolling over 1,200 students. As a clinical fellow at Duke, he co-authored a textbook chapter on the future of health informatics

  • Geoffrey Tso

    Geoffrey Tso

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Informatics, Clinical Decision Support, Digital Health, Multimorbidity, Preventive Health, Telemedicine, Telehealth, Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence

  • Crystal Unzueta, MD

    Crystal Unzueta, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Unzueta is a board-certified family medicine physician. She specializes in providing primary care services to people of all ages. Her services include annual check-ups, monitoring chronic conditions, and performing minor in-office procedures.

    She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford School of Medicine Department of Family Medicine.

    Dr. Unzueta’s practice focuses on providing compassionate and comprehensive care. She specializes in providing bilingual and bicultural care for patients in underserved populations. She has traveled to Belize on a medical mission to provide free, basic primary care to vulnerable communities. Her mentoring work includes building a network of Latino medical students to help support each other throughout medical school. She has also worked on numerous volunteer projects, such as researching the benefits of a community yoga program for minorities in underserved areas.

  • Sharif Vakili, MD, MBA, MS

    Sharif Vakili, MD, MBA, MS

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioSharif Vakili, MD, MBA, MS, (pronouns: he/him), is an internal medicine physician and educator. He practices at Stanford Los Altos Primary Care.

    Dr. Vakili has a background in chronic disease management and health systems delivery, believing strongly in a teamwork approach to patient care that empowers patients to navigate the health system as part of their clinical care.

    He is active in the research and business communities. His research has been in peer-reviewed journals including JAMA Network Open, the Annals of Emergency Medicine, Quality Management in Healthcare, and Journal of Clinical Rheumatology.

    Dr. Vakili is also the inventor of Remote Patient Intervention (RPI), a model of clinician-supervised AI care delivery first performed at Stanford during a clinical study published in JAMA Network Open.

  • Kathan Vollrath, MD, MPH

    Kathan Vollrath, MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr Vollrath is an internal medicine primary care physician at Stanford Internal Medicine Clinic. She provides asynchronous message-based care via myHealth, including inbox coverage for faculty on vacation. She is a QuEST scholar, studying the implementation of this new service.

  • Katherine T. Ward, MD

    Katherine T. Ward, MD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Ward is a board-certified, fellowship-trained geriatrician with Stanford Senior Care in Palo Alto, California. She is also board certified in hospice and palliative medicine and internal medicine. Dr. Ward is a clinical professor of medicine and clinical chief of the Geriatrics Section in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in many facets of care for older adults, including internal medicine, dementia care, and palliative care. Dr. Ward uses her extensive experience to teach and implement best practices in nursing home care, geriatric assessment, and care transitions for older adults.

    Dr. Ward’s research interests include early detection of dementia in vulnerable populations, dementia care support programs, and geriatric assessment in diverse populations.

    She has published her research in peer-reviewed journals including The American Journal of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy; The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging; and the Journal of Palliative Medicine. She has served as an ad hoc reviewer for several journals, including Geriatrics. She has also presented posters at annual meetings of the American Geriatrics Society and the Society of General Internal Medicine.

    Dr. Ward is a member of the American College of Physicians and the American Geriatrics Society.

  • Eva Weinlander

    Eva Weinlander

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWomen's Health
    Mind Body Medicine
    Chronic Disease Management

  • Kirsti Weng Elder MD/MPH

    Kirsti Weng Elder MD/MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Weng is the Section Chief of General Primary Care. She has over 25 years of experience caring for patients in primary care, urgent care and in the hospital. She is also a teacher of students and residents. As a leader in primary care re-design, she is passionate about practicing patient-centered medicine. She is a an advocate of Mindfulness Self-compassion to develop equanimity. She practices with an emphasis on musculoskeletal care as she feels fitness is the foundation of wellness. She is a leader in organizational change and physician management. She supports community health and care for the underserved. Outside of work she enjoys biking, reading and spending time with her 8 children.

  • Temesgen 'Tem'  Woldeyesus

    Temesgen 'Tem' Woldeyesus

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Tem (Temesgen) is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He obtained his medical degree at UCSF and continued his residency training at UCSF in Family and Community Medicine. He was selected as Chief Resident, where he further developed as a clinical educator and administrator, prior to joining the faculty group at Stanford. His academic interests include alternative models of care, clinical informatics, and digital health equity.

    Dr. Tem Woldeyesus practices full-spectrum family medicine, which includes care for the entire age spectrum. He is driven to provide evidence-based, high quality, culturally competent care.

    He is a native of the Bay Area. Outside of work, he enjoys spending time with his fiancée, playing (and watching) basketball, and exploring national parks.

  • Hannah Wright

    Hannah Wright

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioHannah Wright, MMS, PA-C has been a practicing physician assistant since 2010. She received her PA education at Stanford and earned a Master of Medical Science degree from Saint Francis University. She has worked in Family Practice, Internal Medicine, Gynecology. Since 2013 she has worked in the Stanford Express Care Clinic. She is also a Clinical Instructor of Medicine and an E4C-PA in the Stanford Masters of Science in PA Studies Program.

  • Seema Yasmin

    Seema Yasmin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioSeema Yasmin is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, poet, medical doctor and author. Yasmin served as an officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where she investigated disease outbreaks and was principal investigator on a number of CDC studies. Yasmin trained in journalism at the University of Toronto and in medicine at the University of Cambridge.

    Yasmin was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news in 2017 with a team from The Dallas Morning News for coverage of a mass shooting, and recipient of an Emmy for her reporting on neglected diseases. She received multiple grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for coverage of gender based violence in India and the aftermath of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. In 2017, Yasmin was a John S. Knight Fellow in Journalism at Stanford University investigating the spread of health misinformation and disinformation during public health crises. Previously she was a science correspondent at The Dallas Morning News, medical analyst for CNN, and professor of public health at the University of Texas at Dallas. She teaches crisis management and crisis communication at the UCLA Anderson School of Management as a Visiting Assistant Professor.

    She is the author of eight non-fiction, fiction, poetry and childrens books, including: What the Fact?! Finding the Truth in All the Noise (Simon and Schuster, 2022); Viral BS: Medical Myths and Why We Fall For Them (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021); Muslim Women Are Everything: Stereotype-Shattering Stories of Courage, Inspiration and Adventure (HarperCollins, 2020); If God Is A Virus: Poems (Haymarket, 2021); Unbecoming: A Novel (Simon and Schuster, 2024); Djinnology: An Illuminated Compendium of Spirits and Stories from the Muslim World (Chronicle, 2024); and The ABCs of Queer History (Workman Books, 2024). Her writing appears in The New York Times, Rolling Stone, WIRED, Scientific American and other outlets.

    Yasmin’s unique expertise in epidemics and communications has been called upon by the Vatican, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, the Aspen Institute, the Skoll Foundation, the Biden White House, and others. She teaches a new paradigm for trust-building and evidence-based communication to leadership at the World Health Organization and CDC. In 2019, she was the inaugural director of the Stanford Health Communication Initiative.

    Her scholarly work focuses on the spread of scientific misinformation and disinformation, information equity, and the varied susceptibilities of different populations to false information about health and science. In 2020, she received a fellowship from the Emerson Collective for her work on inequitable access to health information. She teaches multimedia storytelling to medical students in the REACH program.

  • Grace Chen Yu

    Grace Chen Yu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Yu is a modern-day version of the “old-fashioned family doc” who delights in caring for patients from “cradle to grave,” while also promoting the health of her community and developing the future leaders of family medicine. On any particular day, one might find her counseling a long-time smoker on quitting, draining an abscess in clinic, delivering a baby, doing a phone (or sometimes home) visit with one of her elderly patients, lecturing about High-Value Health Care, facilitating a diabetes group visit, singing the praises of coordinated primary care to politicians, discussing end-of-life options with a hospitalized patient, or sharing some of her stories as mother-doctor-teacher with one of her advisees. In 2016, adding one more hat to the mix, Dr. Yu became Program Director of the 24-resident Stanford Health Care - O’Connor Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program. Whereas the old-fashioned family doc was a master at caring for patients at different ages and stages of life, as a modern-day family physician, Dr. Yu is committed to researching ways to do so more effectively and efficiently. She considers it a privilege to be a part of her patients' lives and hopes to help both her patients and her trainees find a path to better health and happiness. To keep herself in great health, Dr. Yu enjoys playing the piano, photography, scuba diving, adventure travel (all the more adventurous with her three children in tow!), and spending time with her family and friends.

  • Ilana Rachel Yurkiewicz

    Ilana Rachel Yurkiewicz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Yurkiewicz is a primary care doctor with fellowship training and board certification in internal medicine, oncology, and hematology. She is a clinical assistant professor of primary care and population health in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She provides expert, compassionate clinical care for patients, advocates for them as a medical journalist, and researches ways to improve their lives through better health and quality of life.

    She has a special interest in cancer survivorship and improving transitions between oncology and primary care. Her practice is uniquely focused on providing comprehensive care for patients with a history of cancer as well as those carrying genetic diagnoses of elevated risk.

    For each patient, her goal is to provide thoughtful, compassionate, and holistic care.

    As a journalist, she strives to bridge the gaps between academic medicine and everyday lives. She has been a regular columnist for Scientific American and MDEdge. Her writing has appeared in numerous publications and been reprinted in The Atlantic and The Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology.

    Dr. Yurkiewicz is the author of the book Fragmented: A Doctor’s Quest to Piece Together American Health Care from the publisher W.W. Norton.

    She has co-authored research articles that appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, American Journal of Clinical Oncology, Genetics in Medicine, and other peer-reviewed publications. She also has served as an editorial board member of the journal Hematology News.

    An additional interest of Dr. Yurkiewicz is bioethics. She interned with the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, conducted extensive research, and published her discoveries in the New England Journal of Medicine, Penn Bioethics Journal, and Ivy Journal of Ethics.

    She has presented her research discoveries to her peers at meetings of the American Society of Hematology, Society of Hospital Medicine, National Society of Genetic Counselors, and elsewhere.

    She is a member of the American College of Physicians and an associate member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and American Society of Hematology.

  • Donna Zulman

    Donna Zulman

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests- Health care delivery models for patients with complex medical, social and behavioral needs.
    - Interventions that address social determinants of health
    - Effective communication and relationship-building in the clinical context
    - Patient-facing technology (e.g., video-based care, eHealth technology) to facilitate access to health care