School of Medicine


Showing 41-50 of 59 Results

  • Trung Hoang Minh Pham

    Trung Hoang Minh Pham

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUncovering mechanisms of tissue immunity and immunophysiology during persistent infection

    The immune system safeguards the health of complex organisms by rapidly eliminating invading pathogens, curbing infection-induced tissue disruptions, and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Many bacterial pathogens evade host antimicrobial mechanisms and persist in infected tissues at low levels for long periods of time even in the presence of innate and adaptive immune resistance. During persistent infection, the immune system simultaneously orchestrates antimicrobial responses to contain the pathogen, repairs damaged tissue, regulates nutrient resources, and maintains other tissue physiologic functions to ensure host survival. Failure of any of these tasks leads to uncontrolled infection, devastating disease, and even death. The goals of our research are to understand:

    1)What are the innate and adaptive immune cellular mechanisms that contain pathogens during persistent infection?
    2)How are tissue physiological functions, such as tissue repair and nutrient regulation, maintained during persistent infection?
    3)How do pathogens survive innate and adaptive antimicrobial mechanisms in infected tissues?
    4)How does persistent infection impact host immunity to secondary infections of a similar or different pathogen?

    Through investigating these fundamental questions, we may be able to decode the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that can be harnessed to eradicate infections, promote tissue resilience, and restore health after an infectious insult. We employ animal infection models and bring together immunology, tissue biology, microbiology, and genetics to uncover the mechanisms of tissue immunity and immunophysiology during persistent infection from the molecular to organismal level.

    Current areas of research:
    •Development, maintenance, and plasticity of macrophage functional diversity in infected tissue
    •Tissue repair and nutrient regulation during persistent infection
    •Cellular dynamics and bacterial persistence in lymphoid organs

    We are looking for highly motivated team members who are passionate about making impactful scientific discoveries to join our group at all levels. For opportunities and positions available for pre-doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows, please contact tpham8@stanford.edu!

  • Benjamin Pinsky

    Benjamin Pinsky

    Professor of Pathology, of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and application of molecular assays for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases.

  • Charles G. Prober, MD

    Charles G. Prober, MD

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of infections in children. Much of this research has focused on viral infections, especially those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). I have conducted a number of studies concerned with the epidemiology of HSV-2 infections in pregnant women, their partners, and neonates.

  • Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr. Sarnquist focuses on applied teaching and research on the development, implementation and evaluation of interventions to decrease gender-based violence and prevent HIV infection, especially among adolescents and children. She is particularly interested in rights-based approaches that tackle the complex interplay of factors that lead to poor health for many children and families. All of her work is applied, with direct links health practice and policy, and usually performed in conjunction with non-governmental organization and government partners. She works both globally and in the U.S., with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. She is also a medical educator, directing the scholarly concentrations program of the pediatric residency at Stanford, and co-directing the global health concentration for residents

  • Talal Seddik

    Talal Seddik

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTalal Seddik is a member of the Collaborative Antiviral Study Group. He is the key site investigator at the Stanford site for the following multicenter studies:

    1) DMID 19-0026 Enterovirus Study
    Neonatal Enterovirus and Human Parechovirus Viral Sepsis: Natural History and Predictors of Morbidity and Mortality

    This study will be the first large, multi-state prospective assessment of the viral causes of neonatal sepsis conducted. The main reason for this research study is to get a better understanding of what causes neonatal viral sepsis and to assess the impact of the infection on the babies’ health. Viruses called enterovirus (EV) or human parechovirus (HPeV) are very common in the population and can cause neonatal viral sepsis. By gaining a better understanding of the condition, we hope this information can be used to guide diagnosis and treatment of babies with neonatal viral sepsis in the future.

    This study is actively enrolling subjects

    2) DMID 19-0005 Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) Study
    A Prospective Study of Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) to Define Natural History, Risk Factors and Pathogenetic Mechanisms

    Patients with suspected AFM (onset of flaccid limb weakness within the previous 30 days) are eligible to enroll in the study. Investigators will assess participants at four-time points within the first month of enrollment and will ask participants to return for additional follow up visits at 3 months, 7 months and 1 year. Neurologic improvements will be tracked over time, and samples will be collected and stored in a biorepository for use in future research studies. Household contacts, such as siblings, will be eligible to participate in the study as a control or comparison group.

    This study is actively enrolling subjects.