School of Medicine


Showing 81-100 of 121 Results

  • Karen Chan Osilla

    Karen Chan Osilla

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Osilla conducts health services research with a focus on delivering substance use services to underserved populations using innovative solutions that decrease health access disparities. Dr. Osilla has been conducting addictions research since 2006 and has been involved in clinical trials evaluating cognitive behavioral therapy, collaborative care, and motivational interviewing interventions (web and in-person) among youth, adult, military, family members, and other hard-to-reach populations.

  • Michael Ostacher

    Michael Ostacher

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Ostacher is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is the Site Director for the Addiction Medicine Fellowship at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, where he also serves as the Medical Director of the Pharmacology of Addiction Recovery Clinic, the Director of the Bipolar and Depression Research Program and the Co-Director of the VA/Stanford Exploratory Therapeutics Lab, the Director of Advanced Fellowship Training in Mental Illness Research and Treatment for MDs for the VISN 21 MIRECC, and the Site Director at the VA Palo Alto for Advanced Fellowship Training for Stanford. A graduate of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, the Harvard School of Public Health, and Harvard Medical School, he completed his training at The Cambridge Health Alliance at Harvard Medical School in Adult Psychiatry, Public Psychiatry, and Geriatric Psychiatry, and is currently board certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry, and Addiction Medicine. He is the Digital Content Editor for the journal Evidence-Based Mental Health and is on the editorial boards of Bipolar Disorders, the International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Current Psychiatry, and Psychiatric Annals. His current research includes roles as Site Investigator for VA-BRAVE, multicenter, randomized trial comparing long-acting injectable buprenorphine to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone, and trials of psychedelic drugs in psychiatric disorders in Veterans. With funding from NIDA, he studied, along with Jaimee Heffner, Ph.D. at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, smoking cessation in people with bipolar disorder using a novel online psychotherapy derived from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. His primary research interest is in large clinical trials mental health and addiction, and the implementation of evidence-based mental health practices.

  • Daryn Reicherter

    Daryn Reicherter

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Reicherter the director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Laboratory.

    He has expertise in the area of cross-cultural trauma psychiatry, having spent more than a decade dedicated to providing a combination of administrative and clinical services in trauma mental health locally and internationally. He is on the List of Experts for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and for the United Nations’ International Criminal Court. He is on the Fulbright Specialists Roster for his work in international trauma mental health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Innovations in Global Health at Stanford University. He has created and cultivated new clinical rotations for residency education and medical school education in the community clinics that he operates. And he has created new opportunities for resident, medical student, and undergraduate education in Global Mental Health.

    He has also been involved in the creation of clinical mental health programs for underserved populations in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the Faculty Adviser for the Stanford’s Free Clinic Mental Health Program.

    After receiving degrees in Psychobiology and Philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz, Dr. Reicherter completed his doctorate in medicine at New York Medical College. He completed internship and residency and served as Chief Resident at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics.

  • Carolyn Rodriguez

    Carolyn Rodriguez

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Carolyn Rodriguez is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Stanford University School of Medicine and a Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs. As the Director of the Stanford OCD Research Lab and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dr. Rodriguez leads studies investigating the brain basis of severe mental disorders. Her landmark clinical trials pioneer rapid-acting treatments for illnesses including OCD and related disorders. Her NIH-, foundation-, and donor-funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies span targeted glutamatergic and opioid pathway pharmacotherapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, psychotherapy and suicide prevention.

    Dr. Rodriguez also serves as Deputy Editor of the American Journal of Psychiatry and Deputy Editor of Neuropsychopharmacology. She serves as a member of several scientific councils for non-profit research and advocacy groups including Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and the International OCD Foundation. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and the Dolores Shockley Diversity and Inclusion Advancement Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Carolyn presented her research at the World Economic Forum in Davos and Fortune Brainstorm Health. She is co-author of “Hoarding Disorder: A Comprehensive Clinical Guide,” published August 2022 by APA Publishing.

    Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University, followed by an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and three children in Palo Alto.

  • Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioRESEARCH FOCUS
    Translational cognitive neuroscience of aging and dementia. Neuroethics.

    TRAINING
    Dr. Rosen is board certified in clinical neuropsychology with a geriatric focus. She completed college at Brown University, a clinical psychology Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University, clinical neuropsychology internship at the Long Island Jewish Hospital in New York, and clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Rosen completed specialty research fellowship training at the National Institute on Aging (Intramural Research Training Award) and Stanford (NRSA F32, K01) in functional imaging and noninvasive brain stimulation with support from NIA.

    CLINICAL AND RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
    Dr. Rosen is Director of Dementia Education at the Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center at the Palo Alto VAHCS. She is also a neuropsychologist and part of the consensus clinical group and education core at the Stanford’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (NIA). Dr. Rosen’s funded research has focused on applying cognitive neuroscience of aging to improve clinical practice in older adults by using cognitive measures, brain imaging, and noninvasive brain stimulation such as TMS. Studies include using fMRI as an outcome measure for cognitive training, studying how to improve the accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting with and without image guidance, and using structural MRI to avoid postoperative cognitive decline and improve outcome from carotid vascular procedures. She has a longstanding commitment to neuroethics and leads a feature in the Journal of Alzheimer Disease that focuses on ethical issues in new and emerging AD applications.

    ETHICS EDITOR, JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
    Ethics Review
    http://www.j-alz.com/blogs/discussion/protecting-progress

    MIRECC DEMENTIA EDUCATION
    http://www.mirecc.va.gov/visn21/education/dementia_education.asp

  • Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims at improving processes and outcomes of mental health care for veterans other people suffering from post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders.

    My primary focus is improving access to evidence-based treatments PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. My second emphasis is using telemedicine technologies to expand access to effective care. My third interest is measurement-based care, using ongoing data on patient progress to inform patients' and clinicians' decisions.

  • Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rossi’s research focuses on developing, evaluating, and implementing assessment tools and interventions to improve the safety and mental health of individuals at risk of intimate partner violence, suicide, and drug overdose. She is particularly interested in using technology and clinical decision support tools to enhance the quality and implementation of intimate partner violence-, suicide-, and substance use-related care.

  • Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Adjunct Lecturer, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioThe overarching aim of Dr. Scanlon’s research is to develop and evaluate low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. To that end, the Caregiver Technology Division of the Scanlon Lab aims to enhance patient- and family-centered care through novel, broadly customizable, and highly scalable caregiver interventions. In parallel, the Neurodegenerative Division of the Scanlon Lab focuses on the development and application of cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and biological markers for the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration.

    Dr. Scanlon received his bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience and doctorate in Clinical Health Psychology from the University of Miami. After concluding his clinical internship in Geropsychology/Neuropsychology at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS), he completed fellowships in Aging and Dementia at Stanford University School of Medicine and VAPAHCS. Dr. Scanlon is currently a VA Career Development Awardee in the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) and Stanford/VA Aging Clinical Research Center where his work focuses on developing and evaluating low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. He also serves as Co-Director of the Stanford/VA California Alzheimer's Disease Center, Chair of the VAPAHCS Dementia Committee, and Co-Chair of the Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 21 Dementia Committee.

  • Logan Schneider

    Logan Schneider

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFrom a research perspective, my long-term career plan is to refine the understanding of normal and dysfunctional sleep, much like the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) and Epi4K are doing for the enigmatic epilepsies. Insufficient sleep has been deemed a public health problem with poorly understood behavioral and physiologic sleep disorders lying at the core of the issue. I am currently using well-defined distinct and objective phenotypes (e.g. periodic limb movements, hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy) to acquire the analytic skills necessary to expand my knowledge of both signal processing and genetics, with the former enhancing my ability to identify and/or refine sleep phenotypes, and the latter facilitating the pathophysiological understanding of these phenotypes. As a consequence of a better link between symptoms/phenotypes, physiology, and genetic risks, more personally targeted and effective therapeutics can be developed to address the enriched spectrum of sleep disorders.