School of Medicine


Showing 41-50 of 56 Results

  • Stephen Quake

    Stephen Quake

    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle molecule biophysics, precision force measurement, micro and nano fabrication with soft materials, integrated microfluidics and large scale biological automation.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Intereststhe overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Julia Salzman

    Julia Salzman

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCircular RNA regulation and function; computational and experimental approaches

  • Jan Skotheim

    Jan Skotheim

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overarching goal is to understand how cell growth triggers cell division. Linking growth to division is important because it allows cells to maintain specific size range to best perform their physiological functions. For example, red blood cells must be small enough to flow through small capillaries, whereas macrophages must be large enough to engulf pathogens. In addition to being important for normal cell and tissue physiology, the link between growth and division is misregulated in cancer.

  • Tim Stearns

    Tim Stearns

    Frank Lee and Carol Hall Professor, Senior Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use the tools of genetics, microscopy, and biochemistry to understand fundamental questions of cell biology: How are cells organized by the cytoskeleton? How do the centrosome and cilium control cell control cell signaling? How is cell division coordinated with duplication of the centrosome, and what goes wrong in cancer cells defective in this coordination?

  • Aaron F. Straight

    Aaron F. Straight

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the biology of chromosomes. Our research is focused on understanding how chromosomal domains are specialized for unique functions in chromosome segregation, cell division and cell differentiation. We are particularly interested in the genetic and epigenetic processes that govern vertebrate centromere function, in the organization of the genome in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the roles of RNAs in the regulation of chromosome structure.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Tom Wandless

    Tom Wandless

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe employ an interdisciplinary approach to studies of biological systems, combining synthetic chemistry with biochemistry, cell biology, and structural biology. We invent tools for biology and we are motivated by approaches that enable new experiments with unprecedented control. These new techniques may also provide a window into mechanisms involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Protein quality control is a particular interest at present.