School of Medicine


Showing 51-60 of 80 Results

  • Maryann Abiodun Pitts, MD

    Maryann Abiodun Pitts, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioDr. Pitts is a board-certified pediatrician. She has served as a clinical instructor and assistant clinical professor (affiliated) in the Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She provides care to children and adolescents. Among the services she delivers are well check-ups, vaccinations, acute care, mental health support, and preventive care.

    When patients meet with Dr. Pitts, it is important to her that they always feel respected and heard. If they are not ready or able to answer a question, or if they feel more at ease with a different approach to their appointment, she will always honor how they are feeling.

    Dr. Pitts also works with the community to strengthen the systems that support healthy children and families. She has extensive experience collaborating with community-based organizations and government agencies. Her experience includes serving as a physician partner to the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Aware Initiative. This program develops methods to screen patients and create treatment plans designed to help them heal from the impacts of trauma and toxic stress.

    Her leadership experience includes co-founding POWER: Pediatricians Organizing and Working to End Racism and developing diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives within health institutions. As an invited speaker at regional and national events, she has made many presentations to her peers. She also served as a health equity panelist for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

    Dr. Pitts speaks both English and Spanish.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology, of Pediatrics and of Health Policy

    BioI am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am Director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position, I am committed to making high-value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Eunice Rodriguez

    Eunice Rodriguez

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent program of teaching and research integrates: 1) health disparities and social epidemiology, within the broader area of public health, and 2) program evaluation, as a synthesis of theory and methods applied to the evaluation of health and social programs.

  • Kelly Corbett Sanders

    Kelly Corbett Sanders

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioDr. Kelly Sanders is a Stanford pediatrician and the Technical Lead of the Pandemic Response Initiative at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Institute for Global Health Sciences. She completed a Master of Science and Doctor of Medicine at the University of San Francisco, California, and pediatrics residency training at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University. Before pursuing a career as a physician, Dr. Sanders worked with the UCSF Global Health Group’s Malaria Elimination Initiative (MEI) on operational research projects with partner countries, as well as on developing communications and advocacy priorities with MEI and global partners. Previously, she worked with the UCSF Institute for Global Health Sciences, supporting the creation of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and the UC Global Health Institute. In addition to her work at UCSF, Dr. Sanders practices clinically as a pediatrician at Stanford University, Palo Alto Medical Foundation and Santa Clara Valley Medical Center.

  • Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH

    Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics), of Health Policy and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI conduct interdisciplinary research to understand literacy as potentially modifiable lens for addressing maternal and child health disparities from birth through early adulthood. Applying mixed methods approaches (health-services, epidemiology, ethnography), I have been principal investigator on extramurally-funded research projects (NIH, PCORI, FDA) that aim to examine "natural experiments" in policy and/or to design, implement and test novel system-level interventions.

  • Chethan Sarabu

    Chethan Sarabu

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioChethan Sarabu, MD trained in landscape architecture, pediatrics, and clinical informatics builds anastomoses across these fields to design healthier environments and systems. He is a clinical assistant professor of Pediatrics at Stanford Medicine, Director of Clinical Informatics at Sharecare. Across these roles, he works on designing and implementing a wide array of innovations ranging from patient portals, EHR transformation, virtual clinical trials, and A.I. driven digital biomarkers, to health information policy initiatives all through a lens of health equity and patient privacy.

    He takes care of patients in a community based academic general pediatrics practice at the Gardner Packard Clinic, a Federally Qualified Health Center, where he has also assisted with EHR implementation and transition. He cares deeply on involving children in their own care and strongly focused on protecting the privacy and confidentiality of adolescents in an increasingly digital healthcare system. He helped to form and co-chair the national workgroup, Shift which has been working to promote equitable interoperability.

    Drawing on his background in landscape architecture, Chethan implements and researches nature based health solutions in collaboration with the Stanford Natural Capital Project. Finally, further exploring the role of environment and human health, he is shaping the emergent field of climate health informatics.