School of Medicine


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  • Katherine Steffen

    Katherine Steffen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on using dissemination and implementation science tools to study and enhance care provided to patients in the pediatric ICU. I have a background in human factors research and in implementation science and am also interested in clinical effectiveness and outcomes in the PICU.

  • Lea Steffes

    Lea Steffes

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    BioDr. Steffes, a Wisconsin native, completed medical school and pediatric residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She then moved to the Bay Area and completed her clinical fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at Stanford University in 2020. Additionally, Dr. Steffes received further post-doctoral training in the laboratories of Dr. Maya Kumar and Dr. David Cornfield, studying the cellular and molecular mechanism driving pulmonary vascular disease. In addition to her role as an Instructor in Pediatrics in the division of Pulmonary Medicine, Dr. Steffes is also completing an advanced clinical fellowship in Pulmonary Hypertension at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. Her clinical work consists of caring for patients with pediatric pulmonary and pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, interstitial lung disease, respiratory failure, chronic cough and asthma. Her research is focused on the vascular changes seen in pulmonary hypertension, more specifically understanding the cellular characteristics of occlusive neointimal lesions, the abnormal cells that block pulmonary blood flow in pulmonary hypertension. In her most recent work, Dr. Steffes identified a subset of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells that are the cell of origin for the pathologic neointimal cells and a specific signaling pathway, that when blocked, inhibits the formation of neointimal lesions.

    Dr. Steffes is currently employing advanced single cell sequencing technologies to further understand neointimal cells with the ultimate goal identifying new therapies for pulmonary hypertension, a fatal disease with no known cure.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.

  • David Stevenson

    David Stevenson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on disorders of the RAS/MAPK pathway (eg. NF1, Noonan, CFC, and Costello syndrome). I am working on understanding the impact of RAS signaling on the musculoskeletal system. I use genomic approaches to identify somatic events and modifiers in the RASopathies. I am also involved in identifying outcome measures for use in clinical trials for the associated orthopedic manifestations. Other areas of research involve vascular anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, and hypophosphatasia.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. We are also study the causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

  • Tanya Stoyanova

    Tanya Stoyanova

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStoyanova lab develops new early cancer detection methods and therapeutic strategies for late stage cancers. The current research focus is on protein-based biomarkers for early cancer detection as well as development of new small molecule inhibitors and antibody-based therapies for prostate and other epithelial cancers. The ultimate goals of the laboratory are to improve the early diagnosis and prognosis of clinically significant cancers and guide the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic prostate and other epithelial cancers.

  • Aaron F. Straight

    Aaron F. Straight

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the biology of chromosomes. Our research is focused on understanding how chromosomal domains are specialized for unique functions in chromosome segregation, cell division and cell differentiation. We are particularly interested in the genetic and epigenetic processes that govern vertebrate centromere function, in the organization of the genome in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the roles of RNAs in the regulation of chromosome structure.

  • Sarah Streett

    Sarah Streett

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Sarah Streett is a Clinical Professor of Medicine, the Director of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Education at Stanford, and she is passionate about taking care of people with IBD. She is a national expert in treating complex IBD and initiated a multi-disciplinary approach to care with colorectal surgery, pediatrics, and nutrition. In 2018 she received the Champion of Hope Award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation and serves on their National Scientific Advisory Committee. Her interests focus on fertility and pregnancy in people with IBD, developing precision approaches to IBD therapy, and the role that the microbiome and diet play in its pathogenesis. She is a primary investigator of the Stanford IBD Registry and has research projects focused on optimizing clinical outcomes in IBD, the role of the microbiota and diet in IBD and pregnancy, and applying new technologies to individualizing therapy for IBD. She is also the primary investigator on multiple industry-sponsored IBD trials.

    Teaching is a top priority for Dr. Streett who feels that mentoring fellows in the development of their careers is a privilege. She has held many national leadership roles in the American Gastroenterological Association, where she has been Chair of the Practice Management and Economics Committee, and currently serves on the Government Affairs Committee. She also an appointed member of the Gastrointestinal Drug Advisory Committee at the FDA. She has represented the interests of gastroenterologists and their patients on Capitol Hill numerous times. Dr. Streett believes strongly in a collaborative approach to give patients personalized care based on the latest therapies for the treatment of IBD and is committed to mentoring the next generation of experts in the field.

  • Matthew Strehlow

    Matthew Strehlow

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Strehlow's research is focused on global health and global emergency care. Working with in-country partners, he aims to identify the epidemiology of emergencies in developing countries and leverage the growth of emergency care systems in innovative ways to improve the overall health of the population. Specific examples include improving patient flow between the community and different level facilities and using emergency call center infrastructure to combat gender based violence.

  • Felice Su

    Felice Su

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical pharmacology research is focused on investigating the impact of dynamic organ function on drug disposition and designing dosing strategies based on mathematical models that account for these changes in order to optimize safe medication administration in critically ill children.

    Research through the REVIVE Initiative for Resuscitation Excellence investigates the quality of resuscitation during cardiopulmonary arrest. Areas of focus include early identification during the no-flow state prior to CPR initiation and quality of CPR simulation education.

  • Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the association of weight and urinary incontinence (UI) in women and clinical trials to test strategies to improve outcomes in women’s genitourinary health. We have shown the independent association of weight and UI and the efficacy of weight loss to treat women with UI. I also conduct studies of epidemiology, economics and cost-effectiveness, and novel interventions for UI, sexual dysfunction, vaginal atrophy, pelvic organ prolapse and menopause symptoms.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformation transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Pervez Sultan

    Pervez Sultan

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Pervez Sultan is an Associate Professor of Obstetric Anesthesiology, at Stanford University School of Medicine and also holds an Honorary Faculty position as Associate Professor at University College London. His research interests include defining, characterizing and measuring postpartum recovery.

    Pervez is an Arline and Pete Harman Endowed Faculty Scholar of the Stanford Maternal and Child Health Research Institute at Stanford University.

    He is an elected member of the Association of University Anesthesiologists and currently serves on the Annual Meeting and Live Events and Curriculum Steering Committees of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology in addition to the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Subcommittee for Obstetric Anesthesia and the International Anesthesia Research Society. He is a former recipient of the UK National Institute of Academic Anesthesia Research Award.

    Researchgate profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pervez_Sultan2
    Google Scholar profile: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Z2ftv_IAAAAJ&hl=en
    Twitter: @PervezSultanMD
    Website: www.postpartumrecovery.net

  • Meghan Sumner

    Meghan Sumner

    Associate Professor of Linguistics

    BioI am an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at Stanford University. I conduct research examining the representations and mechanisms listeners use to understand spoken language, and how linguistic and social factors affect speech perception and word recognition. My current research centers around two main themes: (1) Investigating the effects social information cued by different voices have on memory, and the way social biases result in misremembering, and (2) Using foundational psycholinguistic methodologies to understand how speakers and speaker groups who are new to a community (e.g., the case of Syrian refugees in Germany) accommodate to cultural norms within their native languages.

  • Vivien Kon-Ea Sun

    Vivien Kon-Ea Sun

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    BioVivien Sun is a pediatric hospitalist and Clinical Assistant Professor within Stanford’s Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine. She practices at Stanford Healthcare-Valleycare and California Pacific Medical Center. Vivien’s interests include medical education, professional development, and caring for the underserved.

    Vivien graduated from Harvard University with a BA in Chemistry with a language citation in Mandarin. She went on to receive an MPhil in Public Health from Cambridge University and an MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her pediatrics residency at UCSF with the Pediatric Leadership for the Underserved (PLUS) program. Upon completion of residency, she served as Chief Resident of pediatrics at UCSF-Mission Bay.

  • Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the role of inositol phosphatases in eye development and disease, using both animal models and human disease tissue. We are a translational laboratory seeking to understand the basic function of proteins as well as developing therapeutic strategies for clinical trials.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.

  • Philip Sunshine

    Philip Sunshine

    Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary interests are in the area of neonatal nutrition and developmental gastroenterology. The use of parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants, and the introduction of early enteral feeding to stimulate gastrointestinal maturation are my specific areas of investigative endeavors.

  • Katrin J Svensson

    Katrin J Svensson

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular metabolism
    Protein biochemistry
    Cell biology and function
    Animal physiology

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2022 To 06/30/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProgram Overview

    The world we enjoy, including the oxygen we breathe, has been beneficially created by biological systems. Consequently, we believe that innovative biotechnologies can also serve to help correct a natural world that non-natural technologies have pushed out of balance. We must work together to provide a sustainable world system capable of equitably improving the lives of over 10 billion people.
    Toward that objective, our program focuses on human health as well as planet health. To address particularly difficult challenges, we seek to synergistically combine: 1) the design and evolution of complex protein-based nanoparticles and enzymatic systems with 2) innovative, uniquely capable cell-free production technologies.
    To advance human health we focus on: a) achieving the 120 year-old dream of producing “magic bullets”; smart nanoparticles that deliver therapeutics or genetic therapies only to specific cells in our bodies; b) precisely designing and efficiently producing vaccines that mimic viruses to stimulate safe and protective immune responses; and c) providing a rapid point-of-care liquid biopsy that will count and harvest circulating tumor cells.
    To address planet health we are pursuing biotechnologies to: a) inexpensively use atmospheric CO2 to produce commodity biochemicals as the basis for a new carbon negative chemical industry, and b) mitigate the intermittency challenges of photovoltaic and wind produced electricity by producing hydrogen either from biomass sugars or directly from sunlight.
    More than 25 years ago, Professor Swartz began his pioneering work to develop cell-free biotechnologies. The new ability to precisely focus biological systems toward efficiently addressing new, “non-natural” objectives has proven tremendously useful as we seek to address the crucial and very difficult challenges listed above. Another critical feature of the program is the courage (or naivete) to approach important objectives that require the development and integration of several necessary-but- not-sufficient technology advances.

  • Ali Bin Syed

    Ali Bin Syed

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    BioDr. Syed is a member of the divisions of Pediatric Radiology and Body MRI and serves as the Director of MRI for Stanford Medicine Children's Health. His clinical interests include MR imaging of pediatric and adult hepatobiliary disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, gynecologic pathology, and congenital heart disease. He is also an active researcher, collaborating with fellow engineers and scientists at Stanford to translate technical innovations in MRI into improved patient care. His recent work focuses on translation of machine learning techniques for rapid, robust MRI in children and adults.

  • Karl G. Sylvester

    Karl G. Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)
    On Partial Leave from 09/01/2022 To 02/28/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsScholarly interests include investigation of molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include common conditions of pregnancy, gut microbial ecology and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

  • Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology)
    On Leave from 11/23/2022 To 12/22/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransarterial administration of chemotherapeutics, radioactive microspheres, and biologics for the treatment of unresectable tumors; management of portal hypertension and complications of cirrhosis (TIPS); treatment of complications of organ transplantation; Venous and pulmonary arterial thrombolysis and reconstruction; Stent and Stent-graft treatment of peripheral vascular diseases, aneurysms, aortic dissections

  • William Talbot

    William Talbot

    Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetic and cellular approaches to investigate the molecular basis of glial development and myelination in the zebrafish.

  • Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Jean Y. Tang MD PhD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on 2 main areas:

    1. Skin cancer:
    - New therapeutics to treat and prevent non-melanoma skin cancer, especially by targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway for BCC tumors
    - Genomic analysis of drug-resistant cancers
    - Identifying risk factors for skin cancer in the Women's Health Initiative

    2. Epidermolysis Bullosa: gene therapy and protein therapy to replace defective/absent Collagen 7 in children and adults with Recessive Dystrophic EB

  • Peter Tass

    Peter Tass

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Peter Tass investigates and develops neuromodulation techniques for understanding and treating neurologic conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, dysfunction following stroke and tinnitus. He creates invasive and non-invasive therapeutic procedures by means of comprehensive computational neuroscience studies and advanced data analysis techniques. The computational neuroscience studies guide experiments that use clinical electrophysiology measures, such as high density EEG recordings and MRI imaging, and various outcome measures. He has pioneered a neuromodulation approach based on thorough computational modelling that employs dynamic self-organization, plasticity and other neuromodulation principles to produce sustained effects after stimulation. To investigate stimulation effects and disease-related brain activity, he focuses on the development of stimulation methods that cause a sustained neural desynchronization by an unlearning of abnormal synaptic interactions. He also performs and contributes to pre-clinical and clinical research in related areas.

  • Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Joyce Teng, MD, PhD

    Professor of Dermatology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    BioJoyce Teng, MD, PhD is a professor in dermatology at Stanford University. She is affiliated with multiple hospitals in the area, including Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) at Stanford and Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC). She received her medical degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and has been in practice for more than 12 years. She is one of the 6 pediatric dermatologists practicing at LPCH and one of 72 at SHC who specialize in Dermatology. She sees patients with rare genetic disorders, birthmarks, vascular anomalies and a variety of inflammatory skin diseases. She is also an experienced pediatric dermatological surgeon. Her research interests are drug discovery and novel therapy for skin disorders.

  • Avnesh Thakor

    Avnesh Thakor

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past decade there has been tremendous advances in the field of Interventional Oncology with the clinical utilization of multiple new innovative locoregional therapies (i.e. chemoembolization, percutaneous ablation).

    Looking forward, our ability to super-selectively deliver new therapies directly to target organs. These therapies include nanoparticles, stem cells and gene therapy and will open new pathways into the emerging field of Interventional Regenerative Medicine.

  • Suzanne Tharin

    Suzanne Tharin

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of my research is the repair of damaged corticospinal circuitry. Therapeutic regeneration strategies will be informed by an understanding both of corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) development and of events occurring in CSMN in the setting of spinal cord injury. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of “suites” of genes. The work in my lab seeks to identify microRNA controls over CSMN development and over the CSMN response to spinal cord injury.

  • Margo Thienemann

    Margo Thienemann

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Disorder

  • Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests-Neuro Oncology Immunotherapy
    -Health Equity
    -Medical Education

  • Robert Tibshirani

    Robert Tibshirani

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is in applied statistics and biostatistics. I specialize in computer-intensive methods for regression and classification, bootstrap, cross-validation and statistical inference, and signal and image analysis for medical diagnosis.

  • Seda Tierney

    Seda Tierney

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAssessment of vascular health in children by non-invasive modalities

    Exercise interventions in children with congenital and acquired heart disease

    Use of telehealth to deliver interventions to children with congenital and acquired heart disease

    Parentally-acquired echocardiograms

    Quality Improvement in Pediatric Echocardiography

    Echocardiography and outcomes in congenital heart disease

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Florencia Torche

    Florencia Torche

    Dunlevie Family Professor

    BioFlorencia Torche is a social scientist with expertise in social demography and social stratification. Professor Torche’s scholarship examines inequality dynamics including intergenerational mobility, disparities in educational attainment, family dynamics, and assortative mating, among others. Her research also examines the influence of early-life exposures –starting before birth– on iindividual wellbeing and inequality. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2020, and to the Sociological Research Association in 2013.

    Torche has led many large data collection projects, including the first national survey on social mobility in Chile and Mexico. She has served as deputy editor of the American Sociological Review (2020-2022 and 2015-2018), Consulting Editor of the American Journal of Sociology, and Editorial Board of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Social Forces, Sociology of Education, and Sociological Theory among others. She has served on the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey.

    Professor Torche holds a BA from the Catholic University of Chile and an MA and PhD in Sociology from Columbia University.

  • Natalie Torok

    Natalie Torok

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory has been focusing on the mechanism of liver fibrosis and the role of hepatocyte cell death in fibrogenic injury. We have demonstrated the intricate link between hepatocyte apoptosis, generation of apoptotic bodies and their efferocytosis by stellate cells triggering fibrogenic activation. Key to this was the activation of the NADPH oxidase NOX2 and production of reactive oxidative species inducing stellate cell transdifferentiation and collagen I transcription. We have expanded our work focusing on the role of non-phagocytic NOX4 in dysregulating insulin responses and precipitating ER and mitochondrial stress signaling in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. We are particularly interested in clinical conditions that are linked to accelerated fibrosis such as during aging and T2DM. Our other major focus is on alcoholic hepatitis, and defining novel therapeutic targets based on sterile inflammatory pathways. Our ultimate goal is translation and developing new treatment approaches that reverse fibrosis and improve patient outcomes.

  • Katherine Travis

    Katherine Travis

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics)

    BioDr. Katherine Travis is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Travis obtained her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of California San Diego. Dr. Travis came to Stanford as a postdoctoral fellow to obtain training in clinical neuroscience and translational approaches to intervention. As part of her training, she was awarded a K99/R00 Pathway to Independence grant from the National Institutes of Health.

    Her research uses human neuroimaging and behavioral measures to examine the neural bases of early language learning in infants and young children. The goal of her research is to develop therapies and interventions to help promote language learning outcomes in children at-risk for learning disabilities. Currently, she directs an NIH-funded clinical trial that will use diffusion MRI to assess whether there are changes in brain structure following a language intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for preterm infants.

  • Jennifer Tremmel

    Jennifer Tremmel

    Susan P. and Riley P. Bechtel Medical Director and Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Tremmel studies sex differences in cardiovascular disease. Current research projects include evaluating sex differences in coronary pathophysiology, young patients presenting with myocardial infarction, the impact of stress on anginal symptoms, chronic total coronary occlusions, and vascular access site complications.

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD)

    BioDr. Tsui completed his medical training at Dalhousie University, Halifax, in 1995 after obtaining his Masters of Science in Pharmacy in 1991. These degrees followed a Diploma in Engineering and Bachelors of Science in both Mathematics and Pharmacy. Dr. Tsui completed his anesthesia residency training at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton in 2000, and he received further experience in pediatric anesthesia at British Columbia Children's Hospital in Vancouver. After 16 years of practice at the University of Alberta Hospital and Stollery Children’s Hospital, Dr. Tsui was recruited to Stanford University in 2016.

    Currently, Dr. Tsui is a University Medical Line Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. In his position as an adult and pediatric anesthesiologist at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, he specializes in regional anesthesia techniques.

    Dr. Tsui is an avid and internationally recognized researcher in many areas of regional anesthesia. During his residency, Dr. Tsui developed an interest in improving the accuracy of epidural catheter placement and was issued a U.S. patent in relation to his research. Dr. Tsui has expanded his research into the use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia, with particular relevance to peripheral nerve block performance. Dr. Tsui is also responsible for development of the E-Catheter catheter-over-needle kit for use during peripheral nerve blocks. The primary objective of his research is to transform regional anesthesia from an “art” into a reliable and reproducible “science” by further exploring the basic scientific and clinical aspects of electrophysiological signal monitoring and integrating this with the latest advances in ultrasound.

    Dr. Tsui has received the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) Clinical Scholar award and has previously received research awards and grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society, AHFMR, and University of Alberta. In 2015, a prestigious award, the CAS Research Recognition Award, was presented by the Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society to Dr. Tsui "in recognition of significant research contributions to regional anesthesia, acute pain management and pediatric anesthesia in Canada and around the world". In 2022, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) awarded Dr. Tsui, the Distinguish Service Award. This prestigious annual award has been presented to honor persons who have made remarkable contributions to the field of regional anesthesia and pain medicine.

  • Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Alexander Eckehart Urban

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComplex behavioral and neuropsychiatric phenotypes often have a strong genetic component. This genetic component is often extremely complex and difficult to dissect. The current revolution in genome technology means that we can avail ourselves to tools that make it possible for the first time to begin understanding the complex genetic and epigenetic interactions at the basis of the human mind.

  • PJ Utz

    PJ Utz

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term research goal of the Utz laboratory is to understand autoimmunity, autoantibodies, and how tolerance is broken and can be reestablished.

  • Tulio Valdez, MD, MSc

    Tulio Valdez, MD, MSc

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    BioDr. Tulio A Valdez is a surgeon scientist born and raised in Colombia with a subspecialty interest in Pediatric Otolaryngology. He attended medical school at Universidad Javeriana in Bogota Colombia before undertaking his residency in Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery in Boston. He completed his Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship at Texas Children’s Hospital (2007), Houston and obtained his Master’s in Clinical and Translational Research at the University of Connecticut.

    Clinically, Dr. Valdez has an interest in airway surgery and swallowing disorders. He has a special interest in the management of sinus disease in cystic fibrosis. Dr. Valdez has co-authored one textbook and numerous book chapters and scientific manuscripts. Dr. Valdez continues his clinical research in these areas, particularly with a focus on aerodigestive disorders.

    Scientifically, Dr. Valdez has developed various imaging methods to diagnose otitis media and cholesteatoma a middle ear condition that can lead to hearing loss. He was part of the Laser Biomedical Research Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research includes novel imaging modalities to better diagnose ear infections one of the most common pediatric problems. His research has now expanded to include better intraoperative imaging modalities in pediatric patients to improve surgical outcomes without the need for radiation exposure. 

    Dr. Valdez believes in the multi-disciplinary collaborations to tackle medical problems and has co-invented various medical devices and surgical simulation models.

  • Matt van de Rijn

    Matt van de Rijn

    Sabine Kohler, MD, Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on molecular analysis of human soft tissue tumors (sarcomas) with an emphasis on leiomyosarcoma and desmoid tumors. In addition we study the role of macrophages in range of malignant tumors.

  • Keith Van Haren, MD

    Keith Van Haren, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research group is dedicated to innovating care for children with degenerative brain disorders. We are particularly focused on genetic and autoimmune disorders that cause damage to the myelin (the fatty insulation around the nerves) of the brain and spinal cord. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (genetic) and multiple sclerosis (autoimmune) are the prototypical examples of degenerative disorders of myelin and are the two disorders we study most intensively.

  • Krisa Van Meurs

    Krisa Van Meurs

    Rosemarie Hess Professor, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, hypoxic respiratory failure, inhaled nitric oxide therapy, ECMO, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, neonatal clinical trials, and the use of aEEG and NIRS to detect brain injury.

  • Capucine van Rechem

    Capucine van Rechem

    Assistant Professor of Pathology (Pathology Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy long-term interest lies in understanding the impact chromatin modifiers have on disease development and progression so that more optimal therapeutic opportunities can be achieved. My laboratory explores the direct molecular impact of chromatin-modifying enzymes during cell cycle progression, and characterizes the unappreciated and unconventional roles that these chromatin factors have on cytoplasmic function such as protein synthesis.

  • Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD

    William R. Brody Professor of Pediatric Radiology and Child Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group is focused on developing new fast and quantitative MRI techniques.

  • Anne Villeneuve

    Anne Villeneuve

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor and Professor of Developmental Biology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms underlying homologous chromosome pairing, DNA recombination and chromosome remodeling during meiosis, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an experimental system. High-resolution 3-D imaging of dynamic reorganization of chromosome architecture. Role of protease inhibitors in regulating sperm activation.

  • David Vu

    David Vu

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Vu is a pediatric infectious diseases specialist who is researching human responses to dengue virus and malaria infections. He performed his undergraduate studies at the University of California, San Diego, and obtained his medical doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He trained in general pediatrics at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, and in pediatric infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine. His present studies on pediatric dengue and malaria co-infection are supported by an NIAID Career Development Award (K23 AI127909) and a Instructor K Award Support Program Award from the Maternal & Child Health Research Institute and Department of Pediatrics.

  • Soichi Wakatsuki

    Soichi Wakatsuki

    Professor of Photon Science and of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUbiquitin signaling: structure, function, and therapeutics
    Ubiquitin is a small protein modifier that is ubiquitously produced in the cells and takes part in the regulation of a wide range of cellular activities such as gene transcription and protein turnover. The key to the diversity of the ubiquitin roles in cells is that it is capable of interacting with other cellular proteins either as a single molecule or as different types of chains. Ubiquitin chains are produced through polymerization of ubiquitin molecules via any of their seven internal lysine residues or the N-terminal methionine residue. Covalent interaction of ubiquitin with other proteins is known as ubiquitination which is carried out through an enzymatic cascade composed of the ubiquitin-activating (E1), ubiquitin-conjugating (E2), and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes. The ubiquitin signals are decoded by the ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs). These domains often specifically recognize and non-covalently bind to the different ubiquitin species, resulting in distinct signaling outcomes.
    We apply a combination of the structural (including protein crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) etc.), biocomputational and biochemical techniques to study the ubiquitylation and deubiquitination processes, and recognition of the ubiquitin chains by the proteins harboring ubiquitin-binding domains. Current research interests including SARS-COV2 proteases and their interactions with polyubiquitin chains and ubiquitin pathways in host cell responses, with an ultimate goal of providing strategies for effective therapeutics with reduced levels of side effects.

    Protein self-assembly processes and applications.
    The Surface layers (S-layers) are crystalline protein coats surrounding microbial cells. S-layer proteins (SLPs) regulate their extracellular, self-assembly by crystallizing when exposed to an environmental trigger. We have demonstrated that the Caulobacter crescentus SLP readily crystallizes into sheets both in vivo and in vitro via a calcium-triggered multistep assembly pathway. Observing crystallization using a time course of Cryo-EM imaging has revealed a crystalline intermediate wherein N-terminal nucleation domains exhibit motional dynamics with respect to rigid lattice-forming crystallization domains. Rate enhancement of protein crystallization by a discrete nucleation domain may enable engineering of kinetically controllable self-assembling 2D macromolecular nanomaterials. In particular, this is inspiring designing robust novel platform for nano-scale protein scaffolds for structure-based drug design and nano-bioreactor design for the carbon-cycling enzyme pathway enzymes. Current research focuses on development of nano-scaffolds for high throughput in vitro assays and structure determination of small and flexible proteins and their interaction partners using Cryo-EM, and applying them to cancer and anti-viral therapeutics.

    Multiscale imaging and technology developments.
    Multimodal, multiscale imaging modalities will be developed and integrated to understand how molecular level events of key enzymes and protein network are connected to cellular and multi-cellular functions through intra-cellular organization and interactions of the key machineries in the cell. Larger scale organization of these proteins will be studied by solution X-ray scattering and Cryo-EM. Their spatio-temporal arrangements in the cell organelles, membranes, and cytosol will be further studied by X-ray fluorescence imaging and correlated with cryoEM and super-resolution optical microscopy. We apply these multiscale integrative imaging approaches to biomedical, and environmental and bioenergy research questions with Stanford, DOE national labs, and other domestic and international collaborators.

  • Rebecca D. Walker

    Rebecca D. Walker

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterests include international development in emergency care, healthcare disparities, wilderness medicine, human rights, administration

  • Dennis Wall

    Dennis Wall

    Professor of Pediatrics (Systems Medicine), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSystems biology for design of clinical solutions that detect and treat disease

  • James Wall

    James Wall

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth Technology Innovation

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes. Image systems simulations of optics and sensors and image processing. Data and computation management for reproducible research.

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    Bowei Lee Professor and Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and of Health Policy

    BioDr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) COVID-19 related policies; 2) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 3) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 4) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 5) engaging in healthcare delivery and payment reforms.

  • Kevin Wang, MD, PhD

    Kevin Wang, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Wang lab takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying fundamental mechanisms controlling gene expression in mammalian cells, and how epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, chromatin modifications, and RNA influence chromatin dynamics to affect gene regulation.

  • Marie Wang

    Marie Wang

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvaluation and management of the febrile young infant and infections in hospitalized children; promotion of appropriate antibiotic use.

  • Nancy Ewen Wang

    Nancy Ewen Wang

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hospital Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests- Disparities in Emergency Medical Services for children.
    - Efficacy of novel interventions for pediatric access to care.
    - Teaching and supporting community-initiated interventions and programs internationally.

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    John R. and Ai Giak L. Singleton Director, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang has active collaborations with Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford.

  • Samantha Wang

    Samantha Wang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioSamantha Wang received her Bachelors degree in Molecular & Cell Biology from the University of California, Berkeley, and her MD and Masters in Health Science degrees from Yale University School of Medicine. She completed training in internal medicine residency followed by a chief resident year at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. She led the Women in Internal Medicine Residency Interest Group and was a member of the GME Women in Medicine Leadership Council, where she developed educational programs to develop leadership, wellness, and community among women trainees and allies, and has now continued the work as a faculty liaison. She then joined the Division of Hospital Medicine as faculty to care for acutely ill adult patients. Outside her clinical work, her area of focus is in medical education, specifically clinical skills, patient-centered communication strategies, and health equity; she received the David A. Rytand Teaching Award in recognition of her excellence in clinical teaching. She is the Co-Director for the Clinical Teaching Pathway of Distinction for the Internal Medicine Residency. She was the recipient of a 2021-2022 Teaching & Mentorship Academy educational innovation grant to develop a digitalized curriculum to teach racial justice in clinical decision-making and promote justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion throughout the continuum of medical training. Her research uses quantitative and qualitative methodologies and participatory qualitative approaches with community partners to understand how to effectively teach racial justice in the clinical learning environment.

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsShan Wang was named the Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering in 2018. He directs the Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology and is a leading expert in biosensors, information storage and spintronics. His research and inventions span across a variety of areas including magnetic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cancer biomarkers, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetic sensors, magnetoresistive random access memory, and magnetic integrated inductors.

  • Sui Wang, PhD

    Sui Wang, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie retinal development and diseases. We utilize genetic and genomic tools to uncover how different types of retinal cells, including retinal neurons, glia and the vasculature, respond to developmental cues and disease insults at the epigenomic and transcriptional levels, and how they interact and collectively contribute to the integrity of the retina.

    1. Retinal cell fate specification.
    We are using genetic tools and methods, such as in vivo plasmid electroporation and CRISPR, to dissect the roles of cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors in controlling retinal cell fate specification.

    2. The multicellular responses elicited by diabetes in the retina.
    Diabetes can induce multicellular responses in the retina, including vascular lesions, glial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, all of which contribute to retinopathy. We are using diabetic rats as models to investigate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the diabetes-induced multicellular responses, and the disease mechanisms of diabetic retinopathy.

    3. Molecular tools that allow for cell type-specific labeling and manipulation in vivo.
    Cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers, play essential roles in directing tissue/cell type-specific and stage-specific expression. We are interested in identifying enhancers that can drive cell type-specific expression in the retina and brain, and incorporating them into plasmid or AAV based delivery systems.

  • Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory of Mechanisms in Human Immunity and Disease Pathogenesis

    Studies in our lab are aimed at defining mechanisms in human immunity and disease. We are particularly interested the hypothesis that diversity in antibody-based signaling that arises from diversity in IgG antibodies and their receptors, is a central driver of heterogeneity in human immune functioning and susceptibility to infectious diseases. We are studying how the Fc domain repertoire of an individual impacts the quality of effector cell responses that can be recruited during immune activation and how selectivity of effector responses contributes to immunity and disease.

    SARS-CoV-2, dengue viruses, influenza viruses, disease pathogenesis, influenza vaccines

    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Xinnan Wang

    Xinnan Wang

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms underlying mitochondrial dynamics and function, and their implications in neurological disorders.

  • Katja Gabriele Weinacht, MD, PhD

    Katja Gabriele Weinacht, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
    DiGeorge Syndrome
    Genetic Immune Diseases
    Immune Dysregulation

  • Dana Weintraub

    Dana Weintraub

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include: 1) Childhood obesity, community-based interventions to increase physical activity 2) Impact of medical-legal collaboration on child and family health.

  • Irving Weissman

    Irving Weissman

    Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStem cell and cancer stem cell biology; development of T and B lymphocytes; cell-surface receptors for oncornaviruses in leukemia. Hematopoietic stem cells; Lymphocyte homing, lymphoma invasiveness and metastasis; order of events from hematopoietic stem cells [HSC] to AML leukemia stem cells and blood diseases, and parallels in other tissues; discovery of tumor and pathogenic cell 'don't eat me' and 'eat me' signals, and translation into therapeutics.

  • Marius Wernig

    Marius Wernig

    Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEpigenetic Reprogramming, Direct conversion of fibroblasts into neurons, Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neural Differentiation: implications in development and regenerative medicine

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Nolan Williams

    Nolan Williams

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention

    BioDr. Williams is an Assistant Professor within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Director of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab. Dr. Williams has a broad background in clinical neuroscience and is triple board-certified in general neurology, general psychiatry, as well as behavioral neurology & neuropsychiatry. In addition, he has specific training and clinical expertise in the development of brain stimulation methodologies. Themes of his work include (a) examining the use of spaced learning theory in the application of neurostimulation techniques, (b) development and mechanistic understanding of rapid-acting antidepressants, and (c) identifying objective biomarkers that predict neuromodulation responses in treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric conditions. He has published papers in high-impact peer-reviewed journals including Brain, American Journal of Psychiatry, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Results from his studies have gained widespread attention in journals such as Science and New England Journal of Medicine Journal Watch as well as in the popular press and have been featured in various news sources including Time, Smithsonian, and Newsweek. Dr. Williams received two NARSAD Young Investigator Awards in 2016 and 2018 along with the 2019 Gerald R. Klerman Award. Dr. Williams received the National Institute of Mental Health Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists in 2020.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Helen Wilson

    Helen Wilson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Wilson is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise on the effects of trauma across the lifespan. She provides clinical services for children, adolescents, adults, and families affected by trauma and other forms of anxiety and stress. Dr. Wilson also leads an active research program focused on relationships between childhood trauma and health risk behavior in adolescence and adulthood. She is the Principal Investigator of GIRLTALK: We Talk, a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) that examines links from childhood violence exposure to dating violence and sexual risk in young women from low-income communities in Chicago. Dr. Wilson has authored or co-authored thirty journal articles and book chapters related to these topics, and she regularly presents her work at local and national conferences. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

  • Jeffrey J. Wine

    Jeffrey J. Wine

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal is to understand how a defective ion channel leads to the human genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Studies of ion channels and ion transport involved in gland fluid transport. Methods include SSCP mutation detection and DNA sequencing, protein analysis, patch-clamp recording, ion-selective microelectrodes, electrophysiological analyses of transmembrane ion flows, isotopic metho

  • Virginia Winn

    Virginia Winn

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Winn Laboratory seeks to understand the unique biological mechanisms of human placentation. While the placenta itself is one of the key characteristics for defining mammals, the human placenta is different from most available animal models: it is one of the most invasive placentas, and results in the formation of an organ comprised of cells from both the fetus and the mother. In addition to this fascinating chimerism, fetal cells are deeply involved in the remodeling of the maternal vasculature in order to redirect large volumes of maternal blood to the placenta to support the developing fetus. As such, the investigation of this human organ covers a large array of biological processes, and deals not only with understanding its endocrine function, but the physiologic process of immune tolerance, vascular remodeling, and cellular invasion.

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Richard E. Behrman, MD, Professor of Child Health and Society

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHe is a health policy and outcomes researcher whose work has focused on children's health; health-outcomes disparities by race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status; the interaction of genetics and the environment as these factors influence child and maternal health; and the impact of medical technology on disparities in health outcomes.

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor of Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • John Fraser Wright

    John Fraser Wright

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)
    On Leave from 11/15/2022 To 02/24/2023

    BioJ Fraser Wright, PhD
    Dr. Wright received his PhD in 1989 from the University of Toronto (Biochemistry) for studies
    characterizing the interaction of complement with IgM, and completed post-doctoral studies at INSERM
    / CENG Grenoble, France in molecular immunology focused on antigen processing and presentation. He
    was awarded a CRCS/ MRC Scholarship, gaining faculty appointment at the University of Toronto. In
    1996 he joined industry as a Scientist at Pasteur Sanofi, contributing there to the development of
    vaccines and cancer immunotherapies, and subsequently as Director of Development and Clinical
    Manufacturing at Avigen, a gene therapy company that pioneered AAV-based investigational gene
    therapies for hemophilia and Parkinson’s disease. In 2004 he returned to academia, establishing and
    directing the Clinical Vector Facility at the Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics at Children’s
    Hospital of Philadelphia, and gaining faculty appointment at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman
    School of Medicine as professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. Dr. Wright has contributed to
    several clinical development programs in gene therapy, including for Luxturna and Kymriah, the first
    gene therapies for a genetic (RPE65 deficiency) and non-genetic (CAR-T immunotherapy) disease,
    respectively, approved in the United States, and for the first gene therapy clinical trial that delivered an
    AAV-vectorized monoclonal antibody to human subjects for HIV passive immunity. He is a Co-founder of
    Spark Therapeutics, serving there and subsequently at Axovant as Chief Technology Officer. In 2019 Dr.
    Wright joined Stanford University as Professor of Pediatrics at The Center for Definitive and Curative
    Medicine (CDCM). His research program aims to address key immunological barriers to gene therapy
    through innovative approaches to viral vector design and generation, and to develop vectorized
    antibodies for serious human diseases.