School of Medicine


Showing 141-160 of 164 Results

  • Alexis Thomas Weiner

    Alexis Thomas Weiner

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway polarizes animal cells along an axis parallel to the tissue plane, and in so doing generates long-range organization that can span entire tissues. Although its core proteins and much about their interactions are known, how PCP signaling occurs at a mechanistic level remains fundamentally mysterious. In my current project I will employ novel genetic methods to dissect the logic underlying how cellular asymmetry arises at a molecular level.

  • Jian Xiong

    Jian Xiong

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Chemical Engineering

    BioI thrive to understand the roles of lysosomes in physiological and pathological conditions. Lysosomes are both degradation compartment and metabolic controlling hub, and dysregulation of lysosomal functions are frequently implicated in a vast number of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, however, the systematic knowledge of the molecular mechanism by which lysosomal contributes to these diseases is lacking. Ion channels are the primary mediators of neuronal activity, defects in neuronal ion channel activity are linked with many kinds of neurodegenerative diseases. Interestingly, besides typical ion channels that are involved in the neuronal activity, defects in lysosomal ion channels, such as TRPML1, CLN7 and CLC-7 are also implicated in neuropathy. My previous work as Ph.D student in University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center focused on regulation of lysosomal function by ion channels and metabolites. I discovered a mechanism of lysosomal Na+ channel regulate mTORC1 activation by regulating lysosomal amino acid accumulation. I also discovered role of glutamine in controlling lysosomal degradation capacity. In the meantime, I developed novel methods to isolate organelles. My ultimate research goal is to understand the key developmental pathways and how alterations in gene sequences and expression contribute to human disease, therefore, I am pursuing independent academic researcher as my career goal. Starting Feb 2022, I work with Dr. Monther Abu-Remaileh at Stanford University on role of lysosomes in neurodegenerative diseases. I use genetics, chemical biology and omics approaches to study lysosome function under various physiological and pathological conditions, especially age-associated neurodegenerative disorders, and monogenic neurodegenerative lysosome storage diseases. In Stanford, I aim to integrate ionic regulation, metabolomic regulation and functional proteomic regulation to systematically understand the biology of lysosome in physiological conditions and pathological conditions.

  • Hao Yan

    Hao Yan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bone Marrow Transplantation

    BioAs a highly motivated researcher with a passion for conducting basic research that has direct implications for patient care, I have completed my Ph.D. training in physiology in China and pursued postdoctoral training in the United States. My academic training and research experience have provided me with an excellent background in multiple biological disciplines including developmental biology, gerontology, immunology, and pre-clinic research. As a doctoral student with Dr. Guoliang Xia, I focused on mammalian ovary development and aging with the goal of improving the in-vitro fertilization process for cancer patients and women over 40, and aimed to uncover the mechanisms that control the non-renewable oocyte activation and slow down its quantity and quality loss during aging.
    During my Ph.D. training, I became interested in immunology research, inspired by my involvement in a project on maternal-fetal immunotolerance. In naturally conceived pregnancies, the fetus is semi-allogeneic to the mother, and the maternal immune system is exposed to foreign HLA antigens from the child. However, the fetus is well-tolerated within a specific time window. As a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, I joined the lab of Dr. Robert Negrin, a renowned leader in the bone marrow transplantation (BMT)/GVHD field, to explore immunotolerance-related issues such as graft-versus-host disease and blood malignancies.

  • Chongyang Zhang

    Chongyang Zhang

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiology

    BioDr. Zhang is a Postdoctoral Scholar at RabLab in the cardiopulmonary division. She has a PhD in Pharmacology from University of Rochester, NY. She has research in cardiovascular research and chronobiology published in high impact peer-reviewed journals. She is recipient of honors including predoctoral fellowship from AHA, Travel Grant for Early Career Investigators from Council on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. She has served as ad hoc reviewer for more than 40 manuscripts for reputed journals.

  • Jiayuan Zhao

    Jiayuan Zhao

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychiatry

    BioDr. Jiayuan(Lyrid) Zhao is a clinical psychologist and a postdoctoral scholar for the Stanford Neurodiversity Project.

  • Moss Zhao

    Moss Zhao

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Moss Zhao is an Instructor at Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University. He develops cutting-edge and clinically viable imaging technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases across the lifespan. His specific areas of expertise include physiological modeling, arterial spin labeling, Bayesian inference, PET/MRI, and artificial intelligence. His scientific contributions could significantly improve the early detection of strokes and dementia as well as enrich the knowledge of brain development in the first two decades of life.

    Dr. Zhao received his DPhil at St Cross College of University of Oxford under the supervision of Prof. Michael Chappell. As an alumni mentor, he supports the career development of students of his alma mater. Since 2016, he has presented his work to more than 3000 delegates at international conferences and held leadership positions in professional societies. His research and teaching are supported by the American Heart Association, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Cooperation in Science and Technology.

  • Quan Zhou

    Quan Zhou

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent Research Focus: molecular targeted theranostic imaging of brain tumor and enhanced drug delivery

    Areas of Insterests: molecular imaging, theranostics, fluorescence-guided surgery, brain tumor, drug delivery

    Dr. Zhou has made substantial contributions to the growing biomedical research field of Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging emerged in the mid twentieth century as a highly specialized discipline at the intersection of molecular biology and in vivo imaging, focusing on imaging molecules of medical interest within intact living subjects. Dr. Zhou’s research addresses some of the nation’s most pressing issues related to the development of effective approaches for accurate detection of human diseases and improving their treatment outcome. Her innovations in molecular imaging technology enables the visualization, characterization, and quantification of biologic processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels. The multiple and numerous potentialities of Quan’s work are applicable to the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Her strong education background in biological sciences and biomedical engineering followed by postdoctoral training in translational and clinical research have helped her develop multiple disease-specific molecular probes and imaging strategies for early cancer diagnosis, image-guided surgery, therapeutic delivery prediction and at-risk cardiovascular plaque detection. Her research also contributes to improving the treatment of these disorders by testing and optimizing the execution of new interventions. Her work is expected to have a major economic impact due to earlier disease detection and personalized therapy.

    Dr. Zhou’s research has led to emergence of novel solutions and opportunities, in particular, for molecular imaging of cancer and other diseases, for discovering, leveraging and integration of cancer biomarker and tumor microenvironment information, and for novel approaches to acquire real-time high-resolution contrast enhanced visualization of tumor margin and optimization based on imaging depth, quality and speed. Dr. Zhou has been able to formulate the involved clinical and biological problems into biomedical engineering frameworks and find ways to exploit a variety of modern techniques and approaches from photoacoustic imaging, fluorescence-guided surgery, micro-electromechanical systems and therapeutic delivery strategies in developing elegant and effective solutions. Her work in the Neurosurgery Department and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford involves research related to developing tumor-specific molecular probes, advanced imaging methods and therapeutic delivery systems for adult and pediatric patients with malignant brain cancers to improve margin detection, enhance resection accuracy, and improve treatment outcome.