Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-10 of 11 Results

  • Paul Ehrlich

    Paul Ehrlich

    Bing Professor of Population Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of the social sciences in dealing with global change

  • Marco Einaudi

    Marco Einaudi

    Welton Joseph and Maud L'Anphere Crook Professor of Applied Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOre deposits and exploration; geology and geochemistry of hydrothermal mineral deposits

  • Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D. Professor in the School of Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical approaches: Cognition, complexity, learning, and organizational theories

    Methods: Multi-case Theory Building as well as machine learning, simulation, and econometrics

    Recent research: Business model design, strategy as "simple rules" heuristics, strategic interaction in novel markets and ecosystems, strategy in marketplaces, communities v. firm organizational forms

  • Sahar El Abbadi

    Sahar El Abbadi

    Phys Sci Res Assoc, Energy Science & Engineering

    BioSahar El Abbadi was a post-doctoral researcher in Energy Resources Engineering from Jan 2022 - Aug 2023. Her research focuses on developing circular economies by transforming waste methane into useful products. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is emitted atmosphere by industrial sources (wastewater treatment plants, landfill, fossil fuel extraction) because it is uneconomical to capture, clean and use. However, methane-consuming bacteria can transform this harmful pollutant into protein-rich cells and biodegradable polymers. Sahar's PhD research evaluated the economic potential of using these bacteria to reduce methane emissions while providing a new source of high-quality protein that can be used as a feed for agriculture and aquaculture. Sahar continues to expand on this work in considering the path to industrialization in both the United States and Bangladesh using methane produced at landfills. Sahar completed her Bachelor's degree at UC Berkeley (2012) in Environmental Engineering Science, and her MS (2015) and PhD (2021) in Civil & Environmental Engineering at Stanford.

  • Abbas El Gamal

    Abbas El Gamal

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioAbbas El Gamal is the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. Honors degree from Cairo University in 1972, and his M.S. in Statistics and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering both from Stanford University in 1977 and 1978, respectively. From 1978 to 1980, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at USC. From 2003 to 2012, he was the Director of the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. From 2012 to 2017 he was Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research contributions have been in network information theory, FPGAs, and digital imaging devices and systems. He has authored or coauthored over 230 papers and holds 35 patents in these areas. He is coauthor of the book Network Information Theory (Cambridge Press 2011). He has received several honors and awards for his research contributions, including the 2016 Richard W. Hamming Medal, the 2012 Claude E. Shannon Award, and the 2004 INFOCOM Paper Award. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has co-founded and served on the board of directors and advisory boards of several semiconductor and biotechnology startup companies.

  • Robin Elahi

    Robin Elahi

    Lecturer

    BioI am a lecturer at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station, where I teach courses in kelp forest ecology, statistics, and scientific computing. In general, I study drivers of spatial and temporal change in marine ecosystems. Ongoing and recent research projects include:
    -examining the consequences of fisheries closures on fisher behavior
    -understanding why some coral reefs fare better than their neighbors
    -biodiversity and body size change, particularly in the context of recent human impacts

    I also lead an NSF-funded Research Coordination Network in Undergraduate Biology Education focused on unifying curriculum across marine stations, with the goal of diversifying participation in marine ecology.

  • William Ellsworth

    William Ellsworth

    Professor (Research) of Geophysics, Emeritus

    BioMy research interests can be broadly defined as the study of active faults, the earthquakes they generate and the physics of the earthquake source. A major objective of my work is to improve our knowledge of earthquake hazards through the application of physics-based understanding of the underlying processes. As Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity, my students, postdocs and I conduct multi-disciplinary studies into the causes and consequences of anthropogenic earthquakes in a wide variety of settings. I have also long been committed to earthquake risk reduction, specifically through the transfer of scientific understanding of the hazard to people, businesses, policymakers and government agencies. Before coming to Stanford in 2015, I was a research geophysicist at the U. S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, California for more than 40 years where I focused on problems of seismicity, seismotectonics, probabilistic earthquake forecasting, and earthquake source processes

  • Stefano Ermon

    Stefano Ermon

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University, where I am affiliated with the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and a fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment.

    My research is centered on techniques for scalable and accurate inference in graphical models, statistical modeling of data, large-scale combinatorial optimization, and robust decision making under uncertainty, and is motivated by a range of applications, in particular ones in the emerging field of computational sustainability.

  • W Gary Ernst

    W Gary Ernst

    The Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPetrology/geochemistry and plate tectonics of Circumpacific and Alpine mobile belts; ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in Eurasia; geology of the California Coast Ranges, the cental Klamath Mountains, and White-Inyo Range; geobotany and remote sensing of the American Southwest; mineralogy and human health.