Vice Provost and Dean of Research


Showing 151-184 of 184 Results

  • Krish Seetah

    Krish Seetah

    Associate Professor of Anthropology and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI am a zooarchaeologist, whose focus is primarily on colonisation and colonialism. My zooarchaeological research has used butchery analysis (with the benefit of professional and ethnographic actualistic experience) to investigate agency within the human-animal relationship. More recently, I have employed geometric morphometrics (GMM) as a mechanism for identifying and distinguishing animal populations. This approach to studying colonial activity centres on understanding how people manipulate animal bodies, both during life and after death.

    Alongside the strictly faunal research is a research interest in technologies associated with animal processing. This has been used to investigate issues of technology, trade and socio-economic attitudes within colonial contexts in the Mediterranean (Venice & Montenegro) and the Baltic (Poland, Latvia & Lithuania).

    I am also the Director of the ‘Mauritian Archaeology and Cultural Heritage’ (MACH) project, which studies European Imperialism and colonial activity. This project centres on the movement of peoples and material cultures, specifically within the contexts of slavery and Diaspora. The work of this project has focused on key sites in Mauritius and is based on a systematic programme of excavation and environmental sampling. The underlying aims are to better understand the transition from slavery to indentured labour following abolition, the extent and diversity of trade in the region and the environmental consequences of intense, monoculture, agriculture.

  • Ross Shachter

    Ross Shachter

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Shachter's research has focused on the representation, manipulation, and analysis of uncertainty and probabilistic reasoning in decision systems. As part of this work, he developed the DAVID influence diagram processing system for the Macintosh. He has developed models scheduling patients for cancer follow-up, and analyzing vaccination strategies for HIV and Helobacter pylori.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Christopher Sharp, MD

    Christopher Sharp, MD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Informatics
    Clinical Education
    Teaching Physical Examination
    Quality Improvement
    Preventive Medicine

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • Mitchell L. Stevens

    Mitchell L. Stevens

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy most recent book is Seeing the World: How US Universities Make Knowledge in a Global Era, coauthored with Cynthia Miller-Idriss and Seteney Shami.

    With Ben Gebre-Medhin (UC Berkeley) I developed a synthetic account of change in US higher education.

    With Mike Kirst I edited a volume on the organizational ecology of US colleges and universities.

    With Arik Lifschitz and Michael Sauder I developed a theory of sports and status in US higher education.

    Earlier work on college admissions, home education, and (with Wendy Espeland) quantification continues to inform my scholarly world view.

  • Jenny Suckale

    Jenny Suckale

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy research focuses on understanding disaster risk and resilience. I approach this challenge both from a fundamental point of view by advancing our understanding of the processes that govern extreme events in different natural systems and from an applied point of view by working with private and public partners to increase community resilience using a scientific co-production approach. My research group specializes in the development of customized mathematical models that are testable against observational data from a broad spectrum of scales. Our current research priorities span natural hazards like volcanic eruptions, climate hazards such as ice-sheet instability and permafrost disintegration, and hazards that arise from the interaction between natural processes and human interventions such as flooding in urban areas and induced earthquakes. I was recently awarded the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

  • Elaine Treharne

    Elaine Treharne

    Roberta Bowman Denning Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of German Studies and of Comparative Literature

    BioMy main research interests are in early medieval literature, the long history of information technologies, the handmade book, and cultural landscapes. I have published widely on medieval manuscripts--their materiality, contents and contexts of production and reception. Among various books and articles are the Very Short Introduction to Medieval Literature (OUP, 2015), Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020 to 1220 (OUP, 2012), Old and Middle English, c. 890-1450: An Anthology, 3rd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), The Old English Life of St Nicholas (Leeds, 1997), Textual Distortion (Woodbridge, 2017 with Greg Walker). I was Principal Investigator of the AHRC-funded research project and ebook, 'The Production and Use of English Manuscripts, 1060 to 1220' (http://www.le.ac.uk/ee/em1060to1220/), which ran from 2005 to 2010; Principal Investigator of Stanford Global Currents, funded by the NEH, 2014-2016 (https://globalcurrents.stanford.edu/); and Principal Investigator of CyberText, funded by the CyberInitiative (2016-2018, https://texttechnologies.stanford.edu/research/cybertext-technologies). Each of these funded projects focuses on the uses of computational and digital tools to investigate the history of book production.

    My current projects focus the History of Text Technologies from the earliest times (c. 70,000BCE) to the present day. I have just published Text Technologies: A History (with Claude Willan, Stanford University Press, 2019), which form the first of probably two volumes on this topic. I also co-edit the Stanford University Press Text Technologies Series. I research the hapticity and phenomenology of the handwritten book, and will be publishing The Phenomenal Book based on this work in 2020. This research also extends to a more modern period of the medieval, and to the work of artists, including William Morris, Edward Johnston, Eric Gill and David Jones. This work will appear as Beauty and the Book: Arts and Crafts to Modernism eventually. I am working on Salisbury's Manuscripts for the Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Microfiche Facsimile series. My major research networks involve colleagues at the Universities of Cambridge, Glasgow, Oxford, London, and the University of British Columbia, among others. Stanford Text Technologies collaborates widely with an international group of scholars, both on manuscripts from Western culture, but also manuscripts and inscribed objects from cultures around the world. Finally, a major new project will be called Landscapes of Immortality, and this will seek to incorporate landscape studies, layers of cultural activity, and concepts of immortality. This will form a short book to be published perhaps in 2021.

    Professionally, I am keen advocate and critic of the use of digital technologies in the classroom and in research; and I am concerned about the ways in which we display textual objects and employ interpretative tools and frameworks online. With colleagues here and at Cambridge, we developed online teaching materials for Medieval Manuscript Studies, in a sequence called 'Digging Deeper'. I have been the Ida Beam Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Iowa, an American Philosophical Society Franklin Fellow, a Princeton Procter Fellow, and I'm a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, of the Royal Historical Society, and the English Association (and its former Chair and President). I serve as Editor for the OUP Oxford Bibliographies Online British and Irish Literature initiative, and I am General Editor of the OUP Oxford Textual Perspectives Series.

  • Minang (Mintu) Turakhia

    Minang (Mintu) Turakhia

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Turakhia has an active clinical research program, with funding from AHA, VA, NIH, the medical device industry, and foundations. His research program aims to improve the treatment of heart rhythm disorders, with an emphasis on atrial fibrillation, by evaluating quality and variation of care, comparative and cost-effectiveness of therapies, and risk prediction. Dr. Turakhia has extensive expertise in using large administrative and claims databases for this work. His TREAT-AF retrospective study of over 500,000 patients with newly-diagnosed AF is the largest known research cohort of AF patients. He has served as study PI or chairman of several prominent single- and multicenter trials in atrial fibrillation, investigational devices for electrophysiology procedures, digital health interventions, and sensor technologies.

    His other research interests include technology assessment of new device-based therapies and the impact of changing health policy and reform on the delivery of arrhythmia care. Dr. Turakhia is a Fellow of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and Heart Rhythm Society.

  • Frederick Turner

    Frederick Turner

    Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Art and Art History and of History

    BioFred Turner’s research and teaching focus on media technology and cultural change. He is especially interested in the ways that emerging media have helped shape American life since World War II.

    Turner is the author of three books: The Democratic Surround: Multimedia and American Liberalism from World War II to the Psychedelic Sixties; From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network and the Rise of Digital Utopianism; and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory. His essays have tackled topics ranging from the rise of reality crime television to the role of the Burning Man festival in contemporary new media industries. They are available here: fredturner.stanford.edu/essays/.

    Turner’s research has received a number of academic awards and has been featured in publications ranging from Science and the New York Times to Ten Zen Monkeys. It has also been translated into French, Spanish, German, Polish and Chinese.

    Turner is also the Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Turner taught Communication at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also worked as a freelance journalist for ten years, writing for the Boston Sunday Globe Magazine, the Boston Phoenix, and the Pacific News Service.

    Turner earned his Ph.D. in Communication from the University of California, San Diego. He has also earned a B.A. in English and American Literature from Brown University and an M.A. in English from Columbia University.

  • Camille Utterback

    Camille Utterback

    Associate Professor of Art and Art History and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioCamille Utterback is an internationally acclaimed artist whose interactive installations and reactive sculptures engage participants in a dynamic process of kinesthetic discovery and play. Utterback’s work explores the aesthetic and experiential possibilities of linking computational systems to human movement and gesture in layered and often humorous ways. Her work focuses attention on the continued relevance and richness of the body in our increasingly mediated world.

    Her work has been exhibited at galleries, festivals, and museums internationally, including The Frist Center for Visual Arts, Nashville, TN; The Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; ZERO1 The Art & Technology Network, San Jose, CA; The New Museum of Contemporary Art, The American Museum of the Moving Image, New York; The NTT InterCommunication Center, Tokyo; The Seoul Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Netherlands Institute for Media Art; The Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art; The Center for Contemporary Art, Kiev, Ukraine; and the Ars Electronica Center, Austria. Utterback’s work is in private and public collections including Hewlett Packard, Itaú Cultural Institute in São Paolo, Brazil, and La Caixa Foundation in Barcelona, Spain.

    Awards and honors include a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2009), a Transmediale International Media Art Festival Award (2005), a Rockefeller Foundation New Media Fellowship (2002) and a commission from the Whitney Museum for the CODeDOC project on their ArtPort website (2002). Utterback holds a US patent for a video tracking system she developed while working as a research fellow at New York University (2004). Her work has been featured in The New York Times (2010, 2009, 2003, 2002, 2001), Art in America (October, 2004), Wired Magazine (February 2004), ARTnews (2001) and many other publications. It is also included in Thames & Hudson’s World of Art – Digital Art book (2003) by Christiane Paul.

    Recent public commissions include works for the Liberty Mutual Group, the FOR-SITE Foundation, The Sacramento Airport, The City of San Jose, California, The City of Fontana, California, and the City of St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Other commissions include projects for The American Museum of Natural History in New York, The Pittsburgh Children’s Museum, The Manhattan Children’s Museum, Herman Miller, Shiseido Cosmetics, and other private corporations.

    Utterback is currently an Assistant Professor in the Art and Art History Department at Stanford University. She holds a BA in Art from Williams College, and a Masters degree from The Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. She currently lives and works in San Francisco.

  • Melissa Valentine

    Melissa Valentine

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMelissa Valentine is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Management Science and Engineering Department, and co-director of the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization (WTO).

    Prof Valentine's research focuses on understanding how new technologies change work and organizations. She conducts in-depth observational studies to develop new understanding about new forms of organizing. Her work makes contributions to understanding classic and longstanding challenges in designing groups and organizations (e.g., the role of hierarchy, how to implement change, team stability vs. flexibility) but also brings in deep knowledge of how the rise of information technology has made possible new and different team and organizational forms. Her most recent study examined how the deployment of new algorithms changed the organizational structure of a retail tech company.

    Prof. Valentine has won awards for both research and teaching. She and collaborators won a Best Paper Award at the CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and the Outstanding Paper with Practical Implications award from the Organizational Behavior division of the Academy of Management. In 2013, she won the Organization Science/INFORMS dissertation proposal competition and received her PhD from Harvard University.

  • Gregory Valiant

    Gregory Valiant

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary research interests lie at the intersection of algorithms, learning, applied probability, and statistics. I am particularly interested in understanding the algorithmic and information theoretic possibilities and limitations for many fundamental information extraction tasks that underly real-world machine learning and data-centric applications.

  • Dennis Wall

    Dennis Wall

    Professor of Pediatrics (Systems Medicine), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSystems biology for design of clinical solutions that detect and treat disease

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and of Health Policy (PCOR)

    BioDr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) COVID-19 related policies; 2) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 3) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 4) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 5) engaging in healthcare delivery and payment reforms.

  • Ge Wang

    Ge Wang

    Associate Professor of Music and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGe Wang is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He specializes in the art of design and computer music — researching programming languages and interactive software design for music, interaction design, mobile music, laptop orchestras, expressive design of virtual reality, aesthetics of music technology design, and education at the intersection of computer science and music. Ge is the author of the ChucK music programming language, the founding director of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk). Ge is also the Co-founder of Smule (reaching over 200 million users), and the designer of the iPhone's Ocarina and Magic Piano. Ge is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, and the author of ARTFUL DESIGN: TECHNOLOGY IN SEARCH OF THE SUBLIME—a book on design and technology, art and life‚ published by Stanford University Press in 2018 (see https://artful.design/)

  • Jeremy Weinstein

    Jeremy Weinstein

    Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCivil War, Ethnic Politics, Political Economy of Development, Democracy and Accountability, Africa

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Jiajun Wu

    Jiajun Wu

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioJiajun Wu is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, working on computer vision, machine learning, and computational cognitive science. Before joining Stanford, he was a Visiting Faculty Researcher at Google Research. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Wu's research has been recognized through the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award Honorable Mention, the AAAI/ACM SIGAI Doctoral Dissertation Award, the MIT George M. Sprowls PhD Thesis Award in Artificial Intelligence and Decision-Making, the 2020 Samsung AI Researcher of the Year, the IROS Best Paper Award on Cognitive Robotics, and faculty research awards and graduate fellowships from Samsung, Amazon, Facebook, Nvidia, and Adobe.

  • Lei Xing

    Lei Xing

    Jacob Haimson Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsartificial intelligence in medicine, Image-guided intervention, molecular imaging, biologically conformable radiation threapy (BCRT), treatment plan optimization, optimization, application of molecular imaging to radiation oncology.

  • Daniel Yamins

    Daniel Yamins

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Computer Science
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 06/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab's research lies at intersection of neuroscience, artificial intelligence, psychology and large-scale data analysis. It is founded on two mutually reinforcing hypotheses:

    H1. By studying how the brain solves computational challenges, we can learn to build better artificial intelligence algorithms.

    H2. Through improving artificial intelligence algorithms, we'll discover better models of how the brain works.

    We investigate these hypotheses using techniques from computational modeling and artificial intelligence, high-throughput neurophysiology, functional brain imaging, behavioral psychophysics, and large-scale data analysis.

  • Seema Yasmin

    Seema Yasmin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioSeema Yasmin is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, poet, medical doctor and author. Yasmin served as an officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where she investigated disease outbreaks and was principal investigator on a number of CDC studies. Yasmin trained in journalism at the University of Toronto and in medicine at the University of Cambridge.

    Yasmin was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news in 2017 with a team from The Dallas Morning News and recipient of an Emmy for her reporting on neglected diseases. She received two grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. In 2017, Yasmin was a John S. Knight Fellow in Journalism at Stanford University investigating the spread of health misinformation and disinformation during epidemics. Previously she was a science correspondent at The Dallas Morning News, medical analyst for CNN, and professor of public health at the University of Texas at Dallas.

    Her writing has earned awards and residencies from the Mid Atlantic Arts Council, Hedgebrook, the Millay Colony for the Arts and others. Her first book, The Impatient Dr. Lange (Johns Hopkins University Press, July 2018) is the biography of an AIDS doctor killed on Malaysia Airlines flight MH17. Her second book, Debunked! Pseudoscience, Medical Myths and Why They Persist, is forthcoming in November 2019. A major title about women is forthcoming from HarperCollins in 2020.

    Yasmin’s unique expertise in medicine, epidemics and journalism has been called upon by The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, the Aspen Institute, Skoll Foundation and others.

  • Serena Yeung

    Serena Yeung

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Serena Yeung is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging, the Center for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Bio-X. She also serves on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.

  • Greg Zaharchuk

    Greg Zaharchuk

    Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving medical image quality using deep learning artificial intelligence
    Imaging of cerebral hemodynamics with MRI and CT
    Noninvasive oxygenation measurement with MRI
    Clinical imaging of cerebrovascular disease
    Imaging of cervical artery dissection
    MR/PET in Neuroradiology
    Resting-state fMRI for perfusion imaging and stroke

  • Edward Zalta

    Edward Zalta

    Sr Research Scholar

    BioDr. Edward N. Zalta is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center for the Study of Language and Information at Stanford University. He obtained an honors B.A. from Rice University in 1975, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst in 1981. His research specialties include metaphysics/ontology, philosophy of mathematics, computational metaphysics, philosophical and philosophy of logic, and intensional logic, among others. Zalta has published two books (*Abstract Objects: An Introduction to Axiomatic Metaphysics*, D. Reidel, 1983; and *Intensional Logic and the Metaphysics of Intentionality*, MIT Press, 1988), as well as articles in the Journal of Philosophy, Mind, the Journal of Philosophical Logic, Noûs, and elsewhere. He has taught courses and lectured at universities around the world and is the recipient of the K. Jon Barwise Prize (2016, awarded by the American Philosophical Association, Committee on Computing and Philosophy) and the Covey Award (2009, awarded by the International Association for Computing and Philosophy). Zalta also designed the online Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy <http://plato.stanford.edu/> and now serves as its Principal Editor. For further information, see <http://mally.stanford.edu/zalta.html>.

  • Daniel Zhang

    Daniel Zhang

    Policy Research Manager

    BioDaniel Zhang is the policy research manager at Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). In this role, he works with the AI Index Steering Committee to lead the development of AI Index's programs and events, such as the annual report and the Global AI Vibrancy Tool that measure and evaluate the rapid rate of AI advancement, enabling leaders and decision makers to take meaningful action to advance AI responsibly and ethically. Daniel also works with HAI's policy team to develop and manage several policy research programs, building the bridge between technology research and policy communities.

    Previously, he worked on global AI talent flows and security risks at the Center for Security and Emerging Technology and public education policy at the Riley Institute Center for Education and Leadership. Daniel holds an M.A. in Security Studies from Georgetown University where he concentrated on technology policy and international security and a B.A. in Politics & International Affairs from Furman University.

  • James Zou

    James Zou

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group works on both foundations of statistical machine learning and applications in biomedicine and healthcare. We develop new technologies that make ML more accountable to humans, more reliable/robust and reveals core scientific insights.

    We want our ML to be impactful and beneficial, and as such, we are deeply motivated by transformative applications in biotech and health. We collaborate with and advise many academic and industry groups.