Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 1-4 of 4 Results

  • Tiffany Naiman

    Tiffany Naiman

    Lecturer

    BioTiffany Naiman is a lecturer in The Stanford Storytelling Project (SSP) and is the managing editor and a producer for The Storytelling Project’s podcast, State of the Human. She is also the manager of the Braden Grant Program at Stanford University. Prior to her appointment in SSP, Tiffany was a Thinking Matters Fellow at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Musicology from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2017, where she also holds an appointment in the Herb Alpert School of Music’s music industry program. She teaches classes on listening, audio storytelling, music industry, aging in popular music, sound studies, concept records, David Bowie, and the history of the Blues, Punk, EDM, and Rock & Roll.

    Tiffany also holds master's degrees in African American Studies and Musicology, and a B.A. in American Literature and Culture, all from UCLA. She is a recipient of UCLA’s Dissertation Year Fellowship and Distinguished Teaching Award in Musicology and holder of graduate certificates in Digital Humanities and Experimental Critical Theory. As a scholar of popular music, temporality, disability studies, and the voice, her dissertation, Singing at Death’s Door: Late Style, Disability, and the Temporality of Illness in Popular Music, reflects on musical and cultural responses to illness, disability, and dying while contributing to our understanding of the social significance of popular music in regard to these areas. Tiffany has developed a specialization as a David Bowie scholar and her work is published in The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music Video Analysis (Bloomsbury, 2019), David Bowie: Critical Perspectives (Routledge, 2015) and Enchanting David Bowie: Space/Time/Body/Memory (Bloomsbury, 2015). She another new chapter on Bowie coming out in 2020 in Blackstar Rising & the Purple Reign: Pop Culture & the (After)Lives of David Bowie & Prince (Duke University Press, 2020). She is currently working simultaneously on two monographs; David Bowie in America and Live Through This: Women and the Politics of Illness and Aging in Popular Music.

    Along with her musicological research and teaching, Tiffany is an award-winning documentary film producer, DJ, electronic musician, and the experimental film and music programmer for the Outfest Film Festival in Los Angeles. Her film productions have been screened world wide in festivals, at art museums, in theaters, and have been released digitally. The films include Bight of the Twin (2016), The Glamour & The Squalor (2015), The Cardboard Artist (2015), Exile Nation: The Plastic People (2014), Viva Cuba Libre: Rap Is War (2013), and The Mechanical Bride (2012). She is currently in production with two new films: Welcome to My Daydream (2020) and Revival: Confessions of the Queer and Unholy (2020).

    Tiffany devotes a large portion of her free time to attending live musical performances. She also enjoys spending time in nature photographing wildlife.

  • Alexandra Catherine Neame

    Alexandra Catherine Neame

    Lecturer

    BioLexi Neame is a political theorist and science and technology studies scholar. Her research and teaching interests are in the history of political thought and contemporary democratic theory, with a focus on the politics of science, technology and the environment. She leads an interdisciplinary research project called Arendt on Earth: From the Archimedean Point to the Anthropocene (www.arendtonearth.com), funded by a three-year grant from Humanities Without Walls. During 2017-18 she was a Dissertation Research Fellow at the Center for Humanities and Social Change at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has taught in Northwestern University’s International Studies program, and at Stanford she will teach “Spirit of Democracy,” “100,000 Years of War,” and “Preventing Human Extinction.”

  • Joey Nelson

    Joey Nelson

    Thinking Matters Fellow

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI investigate how reactions between aqueous solutions and Earth materials alter the environment around us and beneath our feet. Mineral surfaces comprise most of the area available for chemical reactions with water in soils and aquifers. Although there is a finite set of reaction types that can occur between minerals and below-ground fluids containing metals and organic molecules, large discrepancies are commonly observed between lab-based experiments and field measurements of concentrations and reaction rates. To eliminate such field-lab discrepancies, a deeper understanding of fundamentals governing groundwater transport and geochemical reactions between mineral surfaces and subsurface fluids is needed, especially at the nanoscale and disordered surfaces. My research probes environmentally- and societally-relevant geochemical reactions that occur at the fluid-mineral interface, with unique attention to the 3-dimensional region surrounding reaction components at this interface. I employ bench-top experiments, spectroscopy, isotope geochemistry, and geochemical and hydrological modeling to elucidate how fluid transport and surface properties affect transition metal adsorption, isotopic fractionation, redox reactions, and release and storage of natural and anthropogenic contaminants. Such research provides insight into complex hydrogeochemical networks and data for constructing increasingly accurate models of contaminant remediation, climatic and hydrogeologic processes, nutrient transport, and natural resource formation.

  • Ashley Newby

    Ashley Newby

    50003579

    BioAshley is currently a lecturer in the Program of Writing and Rhetoric. She earned a B.A. in International Relations, and a B.A. in Social Relations and Policy from Michigan State University, her M.A. in Sociology of Education from New York University, and her PhD in African American and African Studies from Michigan State University with a certificate in Urban Education. Her current research focuses on moving Hip-Hop Education Pedagogy beyond “urban” education to how it can be used by all teachers with all students.