Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 11-20 of 39 Results

  • Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    SLE Lecturer

    BioNura Hossainzadeh is a Lecturer in the Structured Liberal Education program and a political theorist by training. Her interest in political theory began when she was an undergraduate at Harvard, where she studied the canon of political theory—which begins in ancient Greece and ends in contemporary Europe and the U.S. After college, Nura moved to Qom, Iran, enrolling in an all-female Islamic seminary, Jami’at Al-Zahra, and taking courses in Islamic political thought and the Iranian revolution. She continued her study of both Western and Islamic political thought at UC Berkeley’s Department of Political Science, where she earned her Ph.D. in political science in 2016, writing her dissertation on a figure who not only wrote political theory but led an Islamic government—Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

    Nura’s current book project is entitled Islamic Republican: Ruhollah Khomeini’s Political Thought. Khomeini's thought became a primary resource for the writing of Iran’s Islamic constitution and continues to influence politics in contemporary Iran. Nura’s book examines all of Khomeini’s political works in the original Persian: his yet-untranslated book, published in 1943, The Unveiling of Secrets; his more widely read 1970 seminary lectures (later compiled into a book form), Islamic Government; and his post-revolutionary statements, speeches, and correspondence, contained in 11 volumes. The book concludes by investigating how contemporary Islamic thinkers engage Khomeini’s legacy and deploy it to justify or criticize democratic elements in Islamic governance.

    While pursuing research on Khomeini, Nura has taught a variety of courses on topics as diverse as American politics and government, feminist thought, canonical and non-Western political theory, Iranian and Middle East politics, and legal theory.

  • Charlotte Hull

    Charlotte Hull

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioCharlotte Hull is a Lecturer for Civil, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). She earned her Ph.D. from the Stanford Department of History, where she researched the intersection of space, politics, and imperial power in nineteenth-century North America. She earned her undergraduate degree from University of California Berkeley, double majoring in English literature and history with a focus in poetry, the Atlantic world, and the colonial Americas. As a Haas Scholar at Berkeley, Charlotte examined the first generations of English settlement on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, exploring how Islanders––both Wampanoag and English––created new autonomous systems outside of regional and imperial power structures during the mid-seventeenth century. Her thesis received the Highest Honors in History, and her research led her to pursue a graduate degree as a Beinecke Scholar.

    At Stanford, Charlotte has investigated connections between the Atlantic and Pacific worlds as well as the creation of social and political institutions in California and the Hawaiian Islands. Her dissertation, "Connecting California: Agents of U.S. Imperial Expansion, 1783-1848," investigates how and why California became part of the United States in the mid-nineteenth century. The dissertation tracks how the idea of California changed in the minds of U.S. statesmen over the course of multiple administrations and how U.S. agents in the field built the cartographic, diplomatic, and military infrastructure of the American Empire over 70 years. Her research demonstrates how mapping expeditions and attempts at diplomacy ultimately led to military campaigns for U.S. sovereignty over Alta California. Her research has been supported by the U.C. Berkeley History Department, the Haas Scholars Program at U.C. Berkeley, the Beinecke Scholarship Program, the Stanford Department of History, and the Dee family through The Bill Lane Center for the American West.

    Charlotte has taught a wide range of courses at Stanford, including courses in history, interdisciplinary humanities, research-based writing, the writing tutor training seminars for the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking, and graduate-level pedagogy courses. She has recently partnered with the Stanford Career Center and the School of Humanities and Sciences Dean's Office to co-develop a pilot course for humanities PhD students in career exploration. Charlotte has also served as Director of the Honors Mentorship Program in History, Graduate Writing Tutor Coordinator for the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking, Co-coordinator for the U.S. History Workshop, and Writing & Humanities Area Coordinator for the Stanford Summer Academic Resource Center.

  • Michaela Hulstyn

    Michaela Hulstyn

    SLE Lecturer

    BioMichaela Hulstyn is a Lecturer in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), a first-year residential education program at Stanford University.

    Her first monograph, _Unselfing: Global French Literature at the Limits of Consciousness_, is forthcoming with the University of Toronto Press in 2022. Her research interests center on 20th- and 21st-century French and Francophone literature, phenomenology of the self and intersubjectivity, cognitive approaches to transcultural literature, and literature as ethical philosophy. Her work has appeared in MLN, Philosophy and Literature, and Contemporary French and Francophone Studies, among other places.

    She previously held academic appointments at Florida State University and Reed College.

  • Meade Klingensmith

    Meade Klingensmith

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioMeade Klingensmith is a Lecturer for Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). He received his BA in History from Oberlin College in 2012, was a Fulbright Postgraduate Scholar at the University of Kent from 2013-14, and completed his PhD in History at Stanford in 2022.

    Meade's research focuses on the history of British imperialism in the Middle East. His dissertation examines the British left's debate over "the problem of Palestine" during the years of the British Mandate for Palestine (1923-48), with a theoretical focus on the limits and possibilities of metropolitan anti-imperialism. He intends to expand this work into a larger project on the place of Palestine in British politics and culture over the long duree.

    In his teaching, Meade is interested in the broader dynamics of empire and resistance throughout history and around the world. At Stanford he has taught on British and Middle East history and has designed courses on empire and resistance in the modern Middle East. In addition to his teaching at Stanford, Meade is committed to public, community, and high school education, having volunteered in multiple capacities at Sequoia High School in Redwood City and worked for Stanford Online High School. He is also a multi-instrumentalist musician who loves to incorporate music and music history in the classroom.

  • Alison Grace Laurence

    Alison Grace Laurence

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioAlison Laurence is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education. She received her PhD from MIT’s interdisciplinary program in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS) in 2019. A cultural and environmental historian, she specializes in the historical study of nature on display, non-human animals, deep time, and extinction. Her current book manuscript--Of Dinosaurs and Culture Wars: A Monumental Reckoning with Modern American Monsters--traces how popular displays transformed dinosaurs and other creatures of deep time from scientific specimens to consumer objects and artifacts of everyday American life. Alison has published her research in Museum & Society, Notes & Records: The Royal Society Journal of the History of Science, and the Science Museum Group Journal. She holds a BA in Classics from Brown University and an MA in History and Public History from the University of New Orleans.

    At Stanford, Alison has taught special topics courses like "Animal Archives: History Beyond the Human" and a variety of courses within the first-year liberal arts requirement, including: "Stories Everywhere," "100,000 Years of War," "Design That Understands Us," and "The Meat We Eat." During the 2022-2023 academic year, she is teaching "Why College?: Your Education and the Good Life," "Citizenship in the 21st Century," and "The Meat We Eat."

  • Roy Lee

    Roy Lee

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioI am a COLLEGE Fellow. I am currently teaching Why College? and Digital Privacy and Ethics. My research focuses on ancient Greek philosophy, especially Aristotle's ethics. I also have interests in contemporary ethics, including applied ethics, social and political philosophy, and other periods and areas of the history of philosophy.

  • Mejgan Massoumi

    Mejgan Massoumi

    Lecturer & Fellow in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioMejgan Massoumi received her Ph.D. in June of 2021 from the History Department at Stanford University. Her work and research explores Afghan engagement with a global communication technology, the radio, during a period of intense political reform and social transformations (1960-1979). Drawing on archives in Farsi, Pashto, Tajik, Urdu, and English, and a collection of oral histories from former Radio Afghanistan employees and other producers of music and art, her work offers a fresh perspective on Afghan history by considering the mobile and fluid international networks made possible through the producers and consumers of the radio and music in the twentieth century and the centrality of Afghan people to that story.

    Having earned previous degrees in Architecture (B.A.) and City Planning (M.C.P) from the University of California at Berkeley, the foundation of her scholarship is built upon a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective. Her study of the past is informed through the study of sounds broadcast in and beyond the built environment.

    As a scholar and educator, and refugee and immigrant, Mejgan is committed to advancing a culture of equity and inclusion within academia through her activism and advocacy for diversity as well as her teaching and scholarship focused on the study of history through the experiences of marginalized peoples, places, and cultures.

    Mejgan's previous research explored how the dynamics of different forms of religious fundamentalisms are produced, represented and practiced in the city. The culmination of this research can be found in her co-edited book, The Fundamentalist City? Religiosity and the Remaking of Urban Space (Routledge, 2010). Another project that explored the multiple meanings of diversity, inclusion, and exclusion in fast-changing urban contexts resulted in the co-edited volume Urban Diversity: Space, Culture, and Inclusive Pluralism in Cities Worldwide (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010). Her master's research focused on race and inter-ethnic conflicts in post-9/11 Afghanistan, highlighting how humanitarian aid from the West contributed to deepening social and ethnic divides. She has also contributed articles to the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, the International Journal of Islamic Architecture, and the Journal of International Affairs at Columbia University.

    During the 2021-2022 academic year, Mejgan is teaching "Why College?", "Design that Understands Us", and "Environmental Sustainability: Global Predicaments and Possible Solutions."

    During the 2022-2023 academic year, Mejgan is teaching "Why College?" and "Citizenship in the 21st Century."

  • Hope McCoy

    Hope McCoy

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioDr. McCoy is a Lecturer in the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education program at Stanford University. McCoy’s research agenda focuses on the intersection between education and diplomacy, with an interest in transnational education and policy. Dr. McCoy's first book (under contract), entitled:
    "From Congo to GONGO: Higher Education, Critical Geopolitics, and the New Red Scare" is one of the winners of the 2021 Emerging Scholars Competition in Black Studies. With a focus on Africa and Russia, this book traces the history of contact between the two regions. During each time period—education, politics, and Black studies are woven together, each era with shifting values and purposes that influence foreign relations between Africa and Eurasia.
    A Fulbright scholar (2015-2016, Russia) with multidisciplinary expertise, McCoy previously worked as a research strategist at Harvard University on projects related to racial justice, equity, and inclusion. Dr. McCoy earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Northwestern University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from UCLA in Education.