Bio


David B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S. and other high-inequality countries (with a particular focus on the “Great Gatsby” hypothesis that opportunities for social mobility are declining), (c) the role of essentialism in explaining the persistence of extreme gender inequality, (d) the forces behind recent changes in the amount of face-to-face and online cross-class contact, and (e) the putative decline of big social classes. He is also involved in projects to improve the country’s infrastructure for monitoring poverty, inequality, and mobility by exploiting administrative and other forms of “big data” more aggressively. His recent books include Social Stratification (2014), Occupy the Future (2013), The New Gilded Age (2012), The Great Recession (2011), The Inequality Reader (2011), and The Inequality Puzzle (2010).

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director, California Welfare Laboratory (2012 - Present)
  • Director, Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, Stanford University (2005 - Present)
  • Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (2003 - Present)
  • Professor, Department of Sociology, Cornell University (1999 - 2004)
  • Founding Director, Center for the Study of Inequality, Cornell University (1997 - 2004)
  • Professor, Department of Sociology, Stanford University (1997 - 1999)
  • Honorary Fellow, Department of Sociology, The University of Wisconsin-Madison (1997 - 1998)
  • Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Stanford University (1992 - 1997)
  • Associate Chair, Department of Sociology, Stanford University (1992 - 1996)
  • Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (1991 - 1992)
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Stanford University (1988 - 1992)
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, The University of Chicago (1986 - 1988)
  • Vilas Graduate Research Fellowship, The University of Wisconsin, Madison (1985 - 1985)
  • University of Wisconsin Graduate Research Fellowship, The University of Wisconsin, Madison (1983 - 1984)
  • National Science Foundation Fellowship for Graduate Study, National Science Foundation (1980 - 1983)

Honors & Awards


  • Max Weber Prize, American Sociological Association (2005)
  • Presidential Young Investigator Five Year Career Award, National Science Foundation (1988 - 1993)
  • Center for Demography and Ecology Traineeship, The University of Wisconsin, Madison (1984 - 1985)
  • First Place Paper, Caroline Rose Competition, American Sociological Association (1983)
  • Class of 1921 Award, Reed College (1980)
  • Faculty and Divisional Commendation for Academic Excellence, Reed College (1976 - 1980)
  • Phi Beta Kappa, Reed College (1976 - 1980)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Director, Recession Trends Initiative (2012 - Present)
  • Co-Director, Collaboration for Poverty Research (2009 - 2011)
  • Senior Editor and Founder, Pathways Magazine (2009 - Present)
  • Senior Editor, Pathways Magazine (2008 - 2013)
  • Co-Editor (with Marta Tienda and Paula England), Studies in Social Inequality, Stanford University Press (1997 - Present)
  • Co-Editor (with Marta Tienda), Westview Press Series on Social Inequality, Westview Press (1987 - 1997)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Stanford University Press, Stanford University (2011 - Present)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Contexts (2004 - 2008)
  • Consulting Editor, Research in Social Stratification and Mobility (2010 - Present)
  • Member, Advisory Board, International Journal of Japanese Sociology (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Worldwide Attitudes (1998 - Present)
  • Member, Research Infrastructure Panel, National Science Foundation, Division of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research (1999 - 1999)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Contemporary Sociology (1995 - 1998)
  • Member, Dissertation Improvement Committee, Sociology Program, National Science Foundation (1995 - 1998)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Research in Social Stratification and Mobility (1994 - 1997)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Stanford University Press, Stanford University (1990 - 1993)
  • Member, Advisory Panel, National Science Foundation, Division of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research, Young Investigators Review Board (1993 - 1993)
  • Associate Editor, American Journal of Sociology, University of Chicago (1987 - 1988)
  • Member, Editorial Board, American Journal of Sociology, University of Chicago (1986 - 1986)
  • Chair, Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility Section, American Sociological Association (2010 - 2011)
  • Member, Advisory Board, Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (2005 - Present)
  • Member, Program Commitee, American Sociological Association (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Committee on Nominations, American Sociological Association (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Technical Working Group on Self Sufficiency, Dept. of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (2011 - Present)
  • Co-Director, Committee to Develop a New Infrastructure to Measure Social Mobility, National Research Council
  • Member, Executive Committee, Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (2001 - 2004)
  • Member, Advisory Board, Center for the Study of Economy and Society (2003 - 2004)
  • Member, Advisory Council, Polson Institute for Global Development (2001 - 2004)
  • Member, Governing Council, American Sociological Association (2002 - 2004)
  • Member, Social Indicator Advisory Board, National Academy of Science (2009 - 2011)
  • Member, Advisory Council, American Sociological Association Methodology Section (2006 - 2008)
  • Member, Society for the Study of Social Problems (2004 - Present)
  • Member, American Sociological Association (1984 - Present)
  • Member, American Statistical Association (1994 - Present)
  • Member, Midwest Sociological Society (1985 - Present)
  • Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science (1985 - Present)
  • Member, Population Association of America (1985 - Present)
  • Member, Social Science History Association (1985 - Present)
  • Member, International Sociological Association Committee #28 (1988 - Present)
  • Member, American Sociological Association Methodology Section (1989 - Present)
  • Member, American Sociological Association Population Section (1989 - Present)
  • Member, Institute for Research on Poverty Working Group (1990 - Present)
  • Member, Southern Sociological Society (1993 - Present)
  • Member, Sociological Research Association (1995 - Present)
  • Member, Sociologists for Women in Society (1998 - Present)
  • Member, Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility Section (2010 - Present)
  • Member, Occupations, Organizations and Work Section (1998 - Present)

Program Affiliations


  • Center for Latin American Studies
  • Public Policy

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., The University of Wisconsin, Madison, Sociology (1987)
  • M.S., The University of Wisconsin, Madison, Sociology (1983)
  • B.A., Reed College, Sociology (1980)

2023-24 Courses


Stanford Advisees


All Publications


  • The intergenerational sources of the U-turn in gender segregation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Zhu, L., Grusky, D. B. 2022; 119 (32): e2121439119

    Abstract

    In the early 1970s, the balkanization of the US labor market into "men's occupations" and "women's occupations" began to unravel, as women entered the professions and other male-typed sectors in record numbers. This decline in gender segregation continued on for several decades but then suddenly stalled at the turn of the century and shows no signs of resuming. Although the stall is itself undisputed, its sources remain unclear. Using nearly a half-century of data from the General Social Survey, we show that a resurgence in segregation-inducing forms of intergenerational transmission stands behind the recent stall. Far from serving as impartial conduits, fathers are now disproportionately conveying male-typed occupations to their sons, whereas mothers are effectively gender-neutral in their transmission outcomes. This segregative turn among fathers accounts for 47% of the stall in the gender segregation trend (between 2000 and 2018), while the earlier integrative turn among fathers accounts for 34% of the initial downturn in segregation (between 1972 and 1999). It follows that a U-turn in intergenerational processes lies behind the U-turn in gender segregation.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.2121439119

    View details for PubMedID 35914176

  • Trends in social mobility depend on the competition between status and money. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Grusky, D. B. 2022; 119 (11): e2200687119

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.2200687119

    View details for PubMedID 35263221

  • Supporting COVID-19 policy response with large-scale mobility-based modeling Chang, S., Wilson, M. L., Lewis, B., Mehrab, Z., Dudakiya, K. K., Pierson, E., Koh, P., Gerardin, J., Redbird, B., Grusky, D., Marathe, M., Leskovec, J., ASSOC COMP MACHINERY ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY. 2021: 2632-2642
  • Mobility network models of COVID-19 explain inequities and inform reopening. Nature Chang, S., Pierson, E., Koh, P. W., Gerardin, J., Redbird, B., Grusky, D., Leskovec, J. 2020

    Abstract

    The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically changed human mobility patterns, necessitating epidemiological models which capture the effects of changes in mobility on virus spread1. We introduce a metapopulation SEIR model that integrates fine-grained, dynamic mobility networks to simulate the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in 10 of the largest US metropolitan statistical areas. Derived from cell phone data, our mobility networks map the hourly movements of 98 million people from neighborhoods (census block groups, or CBGs) to points of interest (POIs) such as restaurants and religious establishments, connecting 57k CBGs to 553k POIs with 5.4 billion hourly edges. We show that by integrating these networks, a relatively simple SEIR model can accurately fit the real case trajectory, despite substantial changes in population behavior over time. Our model predicts that a small minority of "superspreader" POIs account for a large majority of infections and that restricting maximum occupancy at each POI is more effective than uniformly reducing mobility. Our model also correctly predicts higher infection rates among disadvantaged racial and socioeconomic groups2-8 solely from differences in mobility: we find that disadvantaged groups have not been able to reduce mobility as sharply, and that the POIs they visit are more crowded and therefore higher-risk. By capturing who is infected at which locations, our model supports detailed analyses that can inform more effective and equitable policy responses to COVID-19.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41586-020-2923-3

    View details for PubMedID 33171481

  • A promising front in the war on inequality. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Grusky, D. B. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.2005162117

    View details for PubMedID 32366655

  • REJOINDER: A FORCED CRITIQUE OF THE INTERGENERATIONAL ELASTICITY OF THE CONDITIONAL EXPECTATION SOCIOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY, VOL 50 Mitnik, P. A., Grusky, D. B., Melamed, D., Vuolo, M. 2020; 50 (1): 112-130
  • THE INTERGENERATIONAL ELASTICITY OF WHAT? THE CASE FOR REDEFINING THE WORKHORSE MEASURE OF ECONOMIC MOBILITY SOCIOLOGICAL METHODOLOGY, VOL 50 Mitnik, P. A., Grusky, D. B., Melamed, D., Vuolo, M. 2020; 50 (1): 47-95
  • The Rise of Opportunity Markets: How Did It Happen & What Can We Do? DAEDALUS Grusky, D. B., Hall, P. A., Markus, H. 2019; 148 (3): 19–45
  • The American Opportunity Study: A New Infrastructure for Monitoring Outcomes, Evaluating Policy, and Advancing Basic Science. The Russell Sage Foundation journal of the social sciences : RSF Grusky, D. B., Hout, M. n., Smeeding, T. M., Snipp, C. M. 2019; 5 (2): 20–39

    Abstract

    The American Opportunity Study is an ongoing initiative to build the country's capacity to access and analyze linked administrative data. It is best viewed as a population-level scaffolding on which other administrative data can then be hung. This scaffolding, if used as a stand-alone resource, will allow for long-run analyses of fundamental population and labor market processes. If combined with data from other sources, it will allow for long-run program evaluation and other experimental and quasi-experimental analyses. We discuss the current status of the American Opportunity Study, its potential to advance the field, remaining obstacles that must be overcome to build it, and how it can work within the guidelines suggested by the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking.

    View details for DOI 10.7758/RSF.2019.5.2.02

    View details for PubMedID 31168468

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6545984

  • A post-liberal theory of stratification. The British journal of sociology Jackson, M., Grusky, D. B. 2018

    Abstract

    The iconic 'liberal theory' of stratification fails to attend to the many types of downward mobility and wage loss generated by late-industrial stratification systems. Although the liberal theory and its close cousins assume that loss and failure will be interpreted in individualistic terms, recent developments suggest instead that they are generating solidary groups that are increasingly locked into zero-sum contest and successfully mobilized by politicians and other norm entrepreneurs. These developments imply a Marxisant future for late-industrial inequality that bears scant resemblance to the highly individualized, unstructured, and non-conflictual stratification system envisaged by the liberal theory. We outline a new post-liberal theory of stratification that better captures the forces making for change and resistance in late-industrial societies.

    View details for PubMedID 30311186

  • A Qualitative Census of Rural and Urban Poverty ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE Alexander, J., Andersen, R., Cookson, P. W., Edin, K., Fisher, J., Grusky, D. B., Mattingly, M., Varner, C. 2017; 672 (1): 143–61
  • The fading American dream: Trends in absolute income mobility since 1940 SCIENCE Chetty, R., Grusky, D., Hell, M., Hendren, N., Manduca, R., Narang, J. 2017; 356 (6336): 398-405

    Abstract

    We estimated rates of "absolute income mobility"-the fraction of children who earn more than their parents-by combining data from U.S. Census and Current Population Survey cross sections with panel data from de-identified tax records. We found that rates of absolute mobility have fallen from approximately 90% for children born in 1940 to 50% for children born in the 1980s. Increasing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth rates alone cannot restore absolute mobility to the rates experienced by children born in the 1940s. However, distributing current GDP growth more equally across income groups as in the 1940 birth cohort would reverse more than 70% of the decline in mobility. These results imply that reviving the "American dream" of high rates of absolute mobility would require economic growth that is shared more broadly across the income distribution.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.aal4617

    View details for Web of Science ID 000400143000045

    View details for PubMedID 28438988

  • Reducing Inequality in a Populist World REVUE FRANCAISE DE SOCIOLOGIE Grusky, D. B. 2017; 58 (2): 199–205
  • The Persistence of Extreme Gender Segregation in the Twenty-first Century AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Levanon, A., Grusky, D. B. 2016; 122 (2): 573-619
  • Social Mobility in a High-Inequality Regime ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE Mitnik, P. A., Cumberworth, E., Grusky, D. B. 2016; 663 (1): 140-184
  • The Social Fallout of a High-Inequality Regime INTRODUCTION ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE Grusky, D. B., MacLean, A. 2016; 663 (1): 33–52
  • Distributional Effects of the Great Recession: Where Has All the Sociology Gone? ANNUAL REVIEW OF SOCIOLOGY, VOL 42 Redbird, B., Grusky, D. B. 2016; 42: 185-215
  • A New Infrastructure for Monitoring Social Mobility in the United States ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE Grusky, D. B., Smeeding, T. M., Snipp, C. M. 2015; 657 (1): 63-82

    Abstract

    The country's capacity to monitor trends in social mobility has languished since the last major survey on U.S. social mobility was fielded in 1973. It is accordingly difficult to evaluate recent concerns that social mobility may be declining or to develop mobility policy that is adequately informed by evidence. This article presents a new initiative, dubbed the American Opportunity Study (AOS), that would allow the country to monitor social mobility efficiently and with great accuracy. The AOS entails developing the country's capacity to link records across decennial censuses, the American Community Survey, and administrative sources. If an AOS of this sort were assembled, it would open up new fields of social science inquiry; increase opportunities for evidence-based policy on poverty, mobility, child development, and labor markets; and otherwise constitute a new social science resource with much reach and impact.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0002716214549941

    View details for Web of Science ID 000346267200006

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6089542

  • Inequality and Market Failure AMERICAN BEHAVIORAL SCIENTIST Weeden, K. A., Grusky, D. B. 2014; 58 (3): 473-491
  • Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective edited by Grusky, D. B., Weisshaar, K. 2014
  • The Payoff to Skill in the Third Industrial Revolution AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Liu, Y., Grusky, D. B. 2013; 118 (5): 1330-1374

    View details for DOI 10.1086/669498

    View details for Web of Science ID 000318482400005

  • Neighborhood as Destiny? What’s Unknown about Stork Drops and Mobility? PBS Newshour Magazine Grusky, D. B., Snipp, C. M. 2013
  • Economic Inequality in the United States: An Occupy-Inspired Primer OCCUPY THE FUTURE Grusky, D. B., Cumberworth, E., Grusky, D. B., McAdam, D., Reich, R., Satz, D. 2013: 13–45
  • Why Is There So Much Poverty? OCCUPY THE FUTURE Grusky, D. B., Weeden, K. A., Grusky, D. B., McAdam, D., Reich, R., Satz, D. 2013: 71–84
  • Occupy the Future OCCUPY THE FUTURE Grusky, D. B., McAdam, D., Reich, R., Satz, D., Grusky, D. B., McAdam, D., Reich, R., Satz, D. 2013: 3-+
  • A Review of Good Jobs – Bad Jobs (by Arne Kalleberg) American Journal of Sociology Grusky, D. B. 2013
  • Inequality and Market Failure American Behavioral Scientist Weeden, K. A., Grusky, D. B. 2013; 57 (11)
  • Inequality in the Third Industrial Revolution American Journal of Sociology Yujia, L., Grusky, D. B. 2013; 118 (6): 1330-74
  • How Much Protection Does a College Degree Afford? The Impact of the Recession on Recent College Graduates Grusky, D. B., Bird, B. R., Rodriguez, N., Wimer, C. 2013
  • Good Jobs, Bad Jobs: The Rise of Polarized and Precarious Employment Systems in the United States, 1970s to 2000s (Book Review) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Book Review Authored by: Grusky, D. B. 2012; 118 (3): 818–20

    View details for DOI 10.1086/667583

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313721800009

  • The Three Worlds of Inequality AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Weeden, K. A., Grusky, D. B. 2012; 117 (6): 1723-1785

    View details for DOI 10.1086/665035

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305807100004

  • What to Do About Inequality? Boston Review Grusky, D. B. 2012
  • Occupy the Future edited by Grusky, D. B., McAdam, D., Reich, R., Satz, D. Cambridge: MIT Press. 2012
  • The New Gilded Age edited by Grusky, D. B., Katz, T. K. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2012
  • Occupations and Social Mobility: Gradational, Big Class, and Micro-class Reproduction in Comparative Perspective Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility Jonsson, J. O., Grusky, D. B., Pollak, R., Carlo, M. D. edited by Erikson, R., Jannti, M., Smeeding, T. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 2011
  • The Consequences of the Great Recession GREAT RECESSION Grusky, D. B., Western, B., Wimer, C., Grusky, D. B., Western, B., Wimer, C. 2011: 3–20
  • Occupations and Social Mobility: Gradational, Big-Class, and Micro-Class Reproduction in Comparative Perspective PERSISTENCE, PRIVILEGE, AND PARENTING: THE COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INTERGENERATIONAL MOBILITY Jonsson, J. O., Grusky, D. B., Pollak, R., Di Carlo, M., Mood, C., Smeeding, T. M., Erikson, R., Jantti, M. 2011: 138–71
  • THE GREAT RECESSION Preface GREAT RECESSION Grusky, D. B., Wimer, C., Western, B., Grusky, D. B., Western, B., Wimer, C. 2011: IX-XI
  • How Should the U.S. Poor be Counted in the Future? Pathways Magazine Wimer, C., Bergmann, B., Betson, D., Coder, J., Grusky, D. B. 2011: 20-25
  • Theories of Stratification and Inequality The Concise Encyclopedia of Sociology Grusky, D. B. edited by Ritzer, G., Ryan, J. M. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. 2011: 622–224
  • The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender edited by Grusky, D. B., Szelényi, S. Boulder: Westview Press. 2011
  • The Great Recession edited by Grusky, D. B., Western, B., Wimer, C. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 2011
  • Inequality Makes Us Anxious Stanford Social Innovation Review Grusky, D. B. 2010: 18-20
  • The Inequality Puzzle Berger, R., Grusky, D. B., Raffel, T., Samuels, G., Wimer, C. Springer Press. 2010
  • DECIPHERING STRATIFICATION AND INEQUALITY: Japan and Beyond (Book Review) PACIFIC AFFAIRS Book Review Authored by: Grusky, D. B. 2009; 82 (4): 717–19
  • Microclass Mobility: Social Reproduction in Four Countries 37th World Congress of the International-Institute-of-Sociology Jonsson, J. O., Grusky, D. B., Di Carlo, M., Pollak, R., Brinton, M. C. UNIV CHICAGO PRESS. 2009: 977–1036

    Abstract

    In the sociological literature on social mobility, the long-standing convention has been to assume that intergenerational reproduction takes one of two forms: a categorical form that has parents passing on a big-class position to their children or a gradational form that has parents passing on their socioeconomic standing. These approaches ignore in their own ways the important role that occupations play in transferring opportunities from one generation to the next. In new analyses of nationally representative data from the United States, Sweden, Germany, and Japan, the authors show that (a) occupations are an important conduit for social reproduction, (b) the most extreme rigidities in the mobility regime are only revealed when analyses are carried out at the occupational level, and (c) much of what shows up as big-class reproduction in conventional mobility analyses is in fact occupational reproduction in disguise.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000264559600003

    View details for PubMedID 19824300

  • Editing and Altruism Footnotes Grusky, D. B. 2009; 37 (8)
  • Review of Deciphering Stratification and Inequality: Japan and Beyond by Yoshimichi Sato Pacific Affairs Grusky, D. B. 2009; 82 (4)
  • Measuring Poverty: The Case for a Sociological Approach International Conference on Many Dimensions of Poverty Grusky, D. B., Weeden, K. A. PALGRAVE. 2008: 20–35
  • Where’s the Occupation in Occupational Mobility?” Sociologia del Lavoro Grusky, D. B., Jonsson, J. O. 2008; 113: 119-38
  • Are There Social Classes? An Empirical Test of the Sociologist’s Favorite Concept Social Class: How Does it Work? Grusky, D. B., Weeden, K. A. edited by Conley, D., Laureau, A. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 2008: 65–92
  • Social Mobility in Japan: A New Approach to Modeling Trend in Mobility Intergenerational Mobility and Intragenerational Mobility Grusky, D. B., Sato, Y., Jonsson, J. O., Miwa, S., Carlo, M. D., Pollak, R., Brinton, M. C. edited by Watanabe, T. 2008: 1–25
  • Class The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics Durlauf, S. N., Blume, L. E. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd.. 2008; 2nd
  • Poverty and the Hyper-Moral American Stanford Report Grusky, D. B. 2008; 5
  • Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective edited by Grusky, D. B., Ku, M. C., Szelényi, S. Boulder: Westview Press. 2008
  • Social class and earnings inequality AMERICAN BEHAVIORAL SCIENTIST Weeden, K. A., Kim, Y., Di Carlo, M., Grusky, D. B. 2007; 50 (5): 702-736
  • The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender, edited by Grusky, D. B., Szelényi, S. Boulder: Westview Press. 2007
  • Theories of Stratification and Inequality Encyclopedia of Sociology Grusky, D. B. edited by Ritzer, G. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 2007: 4801–4810
  • Describing occupational segregation in sparse and incomplete arrays SOCIOLOGICAL METHODS & RESEARCH Grusky, D. B., Levanon, A. 2006; 34 (4): 554-572
  • Poverty and Inequality edited by Grusky, D. B., Kanbur, R. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2006
  • Inequality: Classic Readings in Race, Class, and Gender edited by Grusky, D. B., Szelényi, S. Boulder: Westview Press. 2006
  • Mobility and Inequality: Frontiers of Research from Sociology and Economics edited by Morgan, S., Fields, G., Grusky, D. B. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2006
  • The Declining Significance of Gender? edited by Blau, F. D., Brinton, M. C., Grusky, D. B. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. 2006
  • Journalists Without Deadlines Contexts Grusky, D. B. 2006; 5: 54-56
  • Did Katrina Recalibrate Attitudes Toward Poverty and Inequality? A Test of the ‘Dirty Little Secret’ Hypothesis Du Bois Review Grusky, D. B., Ryo, E. 2006; 3 (1): 59-82
  • The case for a new class map AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Weeden, K. A., Grusky, D. B. 2005; 111 (1): 141-212
  • Are There Any Social Classes at All? The Shape of Social Inequality: Stratification and Ethnicity in Comparative Perspective Weeden, K. A., Grusky, D. B. edited by Bills, D. 2005: 3–56
  • Is Durkheim a Class Analyst? The Cambridge Companion to Durkheim Grusky, D. B. edited by Alexander, J., Smith, P. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2005
  • Foundations of Class Analysis: A Durkheimian Perspective Approaches to Class Analysis Grusky, D. B., Galescu, G. edited by Wright, E. O. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2005
  • Occupational Ghettos: The Worldwide Segregation of Women and Men Charles, M., Grusky, D. B. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2004
  • Class analysis and the heavy weight of convention ACTA SOCIOLOGICA Grusky, D. B., Weeden, K. A. 2002; 45 (3): 229-236
  • Decomposition without death: A research agenda for a new class analysis ACTA SOCIOLOGICA Grusky, D. B., Weeden, K. A. 2001; 44 (3): 203-218
  • Social Stratification International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Grusky, D. B. edited by Smelser, N. J., Baltes, P. B. 2001: 14,443–52
  • Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective edited by Grusky, D. B. Boulder: Westview Press. 2001
  • Review of Tracking Inequality: Stratification and Mobility in American High Schools, by Samuel Roundfield Lucas Contemporary Sociology Grusky, D. B. 2001; 30: 574-76
  • Should Sociologists Plod Along and Establish Descriptive Regularities or Seek a Grand Explanation for Them? European Sociological Review Grusky, D. B., Carlo, M. D. 2001; 17: 457-64
  • The Case for Realism in Class Analysis Political Power and Social Theory Grusky, D. B., Weeden, K. A., Sørensen, J. B. 2000; 14: 291-305
  • Social Stratification The Encyclopedia of Sociology Grusky, D. B. edited by Borgatta, E. F., Montgomery, R. J. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 2000; Second
  • Durable inequality. (Book Review) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Book Review Authored by: Grusky, D. B. 1999; 104 (6): 1823-1825
  • The simple virtues of descriptive modeling AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW Grusky, D. B., Herting, J. R., Van Rompaey, S. E. 1998; 63 (6): 907-913
  • The past, present, and future of sex segregation methodology DEMOGRAPHY Grusky, D. B., CHARLES, M. 1998; 35 (4): 497-504

    Abstract

    We review the logic underlying margin-free analyses of sex segregation arrays. In the course of our review, we show that the Karmel-MacLachlan decomposition does not live up to its margin-free billing, as the index upon which it rests, Ip, is itself margin-sensitive. Moreover, because the implicit individualism of D is necessarily inconsistent with margin-free analysis, the field would do well to abandon not merely the Karmel-MacLachlan decomposition but all related efforts to purge marginal dependencies from D-inspired measures. The criticisms that Watts (1998) levels against our log-multiplicative approach are likewise unconvincing. We demonstrate that our preferred models pass the test of organizational equivalence, that the "problem" of zero cells can be solved by applying well-developed methods for ransacking incomplete or sparse tables, and that simple log-multiplicative models can be readily devised to analyze disaggregate arrays. We illustrate these conclusions by analyzing a new cross-national archive of detailed segregation data.

    View details for PubMedID 9850473

  • Can class analysis be salvaged? AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Grusky, D. B., Sorensen, J. B. 1998; 103 (5): 1187-1234
  • Models of Influence Required Reading: Sociology’s Most Influential Books Grusky, D. B., Weeden, K. A. edited by Clawson, D. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press. 1998
  • The social geography of interstate mobility and persistence 1995 Meeting of the Population-Association-of-America Herting, J. R., Grusky, D. B., VanRompaey, S. E. AMER SOCIOLOGICAL ASSOC. 1997: 267–87
  • Social Differentiation and Inequality edited by Baron, J. N., Grusky, D. B., Treiman, D. J. Boulder: Westview Press. 1996
  • MODELS FOR DESCRIBING THE UNDERLYING STRUCTURE OF SEX SEGREGATION AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY CHARLES, M., Grusky, D. B. 1995; 100 (4): 931-971
  • Foreword The New Role of Women: Family Formation in Modern Societies Grusky, D. B., Tienda, M. edited by Blossfeld, H. P. Boulder: Westview Press. 1995: ix-x
  • Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological Perspective edited by Grusky, D. B. Boulder: Westview Press. 1994
  • Social Stratification The Blackwell Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Social Thought Grusky, D. B. edited by Outhwaite, W., Bottomore, T. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 1993: 610–613
  • Foreword Persistent Inequality: Changing Educational Attainment in Thirteen Countries Grusky, D. B., Tienda, M. edited by Shavit, Y., Blossfeld, H. P. Boulder: Westview Press. 1993: vii-viii
  • Social Mobility and Class Structure in Early-Industrial France. Building European Society: Occupational Change and Social Mobility in Europe, 1840- 1940 Fukumoto, I. K., Grusky, D. B. edited by Miles, A., Vincent, D. Manchester: Manchester University Press. 1993: 40–67
  • THE VERTICAL SCALING OF OCCUPATIONS - SOME CAUTIONARY COMMENTS AND REFLECTIONS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Grusky, D. B., VanRompaey, S. E. 1992; 97 (6): 1712-1728
  • Social Stratification The Encyclopedia of Sociology Grusky, D. B., Takata, A. A. edited by Borgatta, E. F. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 1992: 1955–70
  • A Quantitative History of Comparative Stratification Research Contemporary Sociology Burton, M. D., Grusky, D. B. 1992; 21: 623-31
  • RECENT TRENDS IN THE PROCESS OF STRATIFICATION DEMOGRAPHY Grusky, D. B., DiPrete, T. A. 1990; 27 (4): 617-637

    Abstract

    Using the 14 annual cross-sections from the General Social Survey, we specify a "basic model" of attainment and describe the year-by-year fluctuations in its parameters. The results are partially consistent with theories describing the gradual growth of universalistic patterns of stratification and mobility. Under a linear model of educational achievement, we find that the direct effects of race are weakening and the returns to class-based advantages are declining in tandem. The contours of the socioeconomic "gender gap" are also changing in important ways, with the male intercept declining at a rapid pace and the female term registering small and insignificant year-by-year gains. At the same time, the returns to experience and schooling are increasing for men, whereas the corresponding returns for women have remained stable over the 15-year period. This pattern of interaction effects implies that the size of the gender gap varies over time and across different population groups.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990EF79300009

    View details for PubMedID 2249749

  • AN OVERLAPPING PERSISTENCE MODEL OF CAREER MOBILITY AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW Stier, H., Grusky, D. B. 1990; 55 (5): 736-756
  • SIMILAR OF DIFFERENT - CONTINUITIES IN DUTCH RESEARCH ON SOCIAL-STRATIFICATION AND SOCIAL-MOBILITY - JANSEN,W, DRONKERS,J, VERRIPS,K (Book Review) CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGY-A JOURNAL OF REVIEWS Book Review Authored by: Grusky, D. B. 1990; 19 (5): 668-669
  • STRUCTURE AND TREND IN THE PROCESS OF STRATIFICATION FOR AMERICAN MEN AND WOMEN AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY DiPrete, T. A., Grusky, D. B. 1990; 96 (1): 107-143
  • THE EMERGENCE OF THE MIDDLE-CLASS - SOCIAL EXPERIENCE IN THE AMERICAN CITY, 1760-1900 - BLUMIN,SM (Book Review) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Book Review Authored by: Grusky, D. B. 1990; 96 (1): 201-203
  • The Multilevel Analysis of Trends with Repeated Cross- Sectional Data. Sociological Methodology DiPrete, T. A., Grusky, D. B. edited by Clogg, C. C. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 1990: 337–68
  • SOCIAL-HISTORY UPDATE - A SOCIOLOGICAL APPROACH TO HISTORICAL SOCIAL-MOBILITY JOURNAL OF SOCIAL HISTORY Grusky, D. B., FUKUMOTO, I. K. 1989; 23 (1): 221-232
  • SOCIAL-MOBILITY AND CLASS-STRUCTURE IN MODERN BRITAIN, 2ND EDITION - GOLDTHORPE,JH (Book Review) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Book Review Authored by: Grusky, D. B. 1989; 95 (2): 481-483
  • Foreword Equality and Achievement in Education by James S. Coleman Tienda, M., Grusky, D. B. Boulder: Westview Press. 1989: ix-x
  • ERRORS IN SLOMCZYNSKI AND KRAUZE COMPARATIVE-ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL-MOBILITY AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW Hauser, R. M., Grusky, D. 1988; 53 (5): 749-752
  • CROSS-NATIONAL VARIATION IN OCCUPATIONAL DISTRIBUTIONS, RELATIVE MOBILITY CHANCES, AND INTERGENERATIONAL SHIFTS IN OCCUPATIONAL DISTRIBUTIONS AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW Hauser, R. M., Grusky, D. B. 1988; 53 (5): 723-741
  • SOCIAL-MOBILITY IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES - EUROPE AND AMERICA IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE - KAELBLE,H (Book Review) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY Book Review Authored by: Grusky, D. B. 1987; 92 (6): 1562-1564
  • SOCIAL BONDING AND COMMUNITY ADJUSTMENT OF CHRONICALLY MENTALLY-ILL ADULTS JOURNAL OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL BEHAVIOR Grusky, O., Tierney, K., Manderscheid, R. W., Grusky, D. B. 1985; 26 (1): 49-63

    View details for Web of Science ID A1985AGK4300005

    View details for PubMedID 3998434

  • Comparative Social Mobility Revisited: Models of Convergence and Divergence in Sixteen Countries American Sociological Review Grusky, D. B., Hauser, R. M. 1984; 49: 19-38
  • INDUSTRIALIZATION AND THE STATUS ATTAINMENT PROCESS - THE THESIS OF INDUSTRIALISM RECONSIDERED AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW Grusky, D. B. 1983; 48 (4): 494-506