Stanford Advisors


Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Emma Armstrong-Carter is a doctoral student in Developmental and Psychological Sciences at Stanford University and a recipient of the IES fellowship training grant. She received her BA in Psychology and Geography from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) in 2016. Prior to coming to Stanford, Emma also worked for two years as the lab manager in the Social Neuroscience and Health Lab at UNC. Her research interest is how biological and social processes shape and interact with children’s cognitive functioning. Emma’s current projects in Jelena Obradovic’s SPARK lab focus on biological sensitivity to context among Pakistani preschool children, and how parent-child co-regulation relates to young children’s physiological responses to emotional challenges.

All Publications


  • A Unifying Approach for Investigating and Understanding Youth's Help and Care for the Family CHILD DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES Armstrong-Carter, E., Olson, E., Telzer, E. 2019

    View details for DOI 10.1111/cdep.12336

    View details for Web of Science ID 000479883500001

  • BETA-ADRENERGIC BLOCKADE BLUNTS INFLAMMATORY AND ANTIVIRAL/ANTIBODY GENE EXPRESSION RESPONSES TO ACUTE SOCIAL STRESS MacCormack, J. K., Gaudier-Diaz, M. M., Armstrong-Carter, E., Arevalo, J. M., Meltzer-Brody, S., Cole, S. W., Muscatell, K. A. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019: A162
  • Role Fulfillment Mediates the Association Between Daily Family Assistance and Cortisol Awakening Response in Adolescents. Child development Armstrong-Carter, E., Ivory, S., Lin, L. C., Muscatell, K. A., Telzer, E. H. 2019

    Abstract

    Family assistance (helping the family) is associated with both positive and negative psychological and biological outcomes during adolescence. However, the association between family assistance and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis remains unstudied. Thus, we assess how helping the family relates to adolescents' diurnal cortisol, an index of HPA activity, and psychological outcomes. Three hundred and seventy ethnically diverse adolescents (ages 11-18) reported daily helping behaviors and psychological experiences for 14days and provided four saliva samples per day for 4days. Multilevel modeling revealed that cortisol awakening response was lower the day after adolescents helped their families more. This association was explained, in part, by perceived role fulfillment (feeling like a good son, daughter, and sibling). Results highlight a possible psychological and biological benefit of assisting the family during adolescence.

    View details for PubMedID 30629290