Bio


Henry A. Curtis, MD, FACEP, FAAEM is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He is fellowship trained in simulation education and has developed expertise in film education, disaster medicine, virtual reality and the medical humanities.

His work in innovative simulation education includes emergency medicine resident and medical student immersive simulation, faculty development, the creation of serious games, playback theater for medical education, directing enhanced disaster medicine education performances and developing national simulation courses.

His lifelong learning has led him to pursue a master of fine arts degree in Directing. He integrates this knowledge into his medical educational offerings and has directed industrial films to provoke challenging discussions as well as to provide clinical education. He has connected this passion with a desire to improve medical education through work in the medical humanities and teaches both EMED 205 and EMED 228. He is now exploring the best means of delivering compelling virtual reality based medical education.

By employing his background in simulation education, film and virtual reality directing, he strives to stimulate sensitivity, develop clinical empathy, uncover insights into the patient-physician relationship, reduce suffering and search for meaning in what the EM faculty, residents and staff do every day.

Clinical Focus


  • Emergency Medicine
  • Simulation Education
  • Medical Humanities
  • Film Education
  • Disaster medicine
  • Virtual reality medical education

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director of Medical Humanities section, Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University (2018 - 2018)
  • Disaster Medicine Section Chair, American College of Emergency Physicians (2017 - 2018)
  • Course Director, Stanford Spectrum Community Engagement Community First Responder Training for Medical Emergencies (2016 - 2016)
  • Disaster Medicine Section Chair-Elect, American College of Emergency Physicians (2015 - 2017)
  • Course Director, Stanford University-Envision Wilderness Medicine simulation program (2015 - 2016)
  • InnovatED Simulation Program Director, Disaster Medicine Section, American College of Emergency Physicians (2014 - 2016)
  • Course Director, Emergency Medicine Maintenance of Certification simulation course (2014 - 2015)

Honors & Awards


  • Mitchell Goldman Service Award, American Academy of Emergency Medicine (3-17-17)
  • Disaster Medicine Section Service to College Award, American College of Emergency Physicians (10-01-15)
  • Disaster Medicine Section Chair's Award, American College of Emergency Physicians (10-29-14)
  • Certificate of Appreciation for instruction of Early Management of Severe Trauma course, Royal Australian Navy Medical School (09-01-11)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member of Emergency Management Committee, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (2017 - Present)
  • Volunteer oral board review course examiner, American Academy of Emergency Medicine (2014 - Present)
  • Newsletter Editor, Disaster Medicine Section of American College of Emergency Physicians (2009 - 2015)
  • Member of Film Health Work Group, Stanford University School of Medicine (2017 - Present)
  • Member of Disaster Medicine section subcommittee for exploring grant funding, American College of Emergency Physicians (2014 - 2015)
  • Member of Transitions of Care Task Force, Stanford University School of Medicine (2014 - 2016)
  • Member of Education national committee, American College of Emergency Physicians (2014 - Present)
  • Member of Online Education national subcommittee, American College of Emergency Physicians (2014 - Present)
  • Member of Disaster Preparedness and Response national committee, American College of Emergency Physicians (2015 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Emergency Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine (2011)
  • Fellowship:Royal North Shore Hospital (2012) Australia
  • Residency:Mount Sinai Medical Center (2010) NY
  • Internship:Mount Sinai Medical Center (2007) NY
  • Medical Education:Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (2006) LA

Community and International Work


  • Myanmar Diploma Course in Emergency Medicine, Yangon, Myanmar

    Topic

    Emergency Medicine

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Stanford Emergency Medicine International

    Populations Served

    Physicians

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Member of the SFUSD CTE Health/Biotech Academic Advisory Board

    Topic

    Career opportunities for high school student careers in healthcare and research labs

    Populations Served

    Health Science and Biotech Academy students at Burton, Galileo, and Wallenberg public high schools

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Exploring the use of virtual reality for engaging discussion towards meaningful medical education.

Comparing the observed vs. the perceived medical severity of illness in patients brought to the hospital by ambulance transport.

All Publications


  • Video-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture for Instructing Emergency Medicine Residents in Disaster Medicine Principles of Mass Triage, Decontamination, and Personal Protective Equipment PREHOSPITAL AND DISASTER MEDICINE Curtis, H. A., Trang, K., Chason, K. W., Biddinger, P. D. 2018; 33 (1): 7–12

    Abstract

    Introduction Great demands have been placed on disaster medicine educators. There is a need to develop innovative methods to educate Emergency Physicians in the ever-expanding body of disaster medicine knowledge. The authors sought to demonstrate that video-based learning (VBL) could be a promising alternative to traditional learning methods for teaching disaster medicine core competencies. Hypothesis/Problem The objective was to compare VBL to traditional lecture (TL) for instructing Emergency Medicine residents in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP; Irving, Texas USA) disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination.A randomized, controlled pilot study compared two methods of instruction for mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Emergency Medicine resident learning was measured with a knowledge quiz, a Likert scale measuring comfort, and a practical exercise. An independent samples t-test compared the scoring of the VBL with the TL group.Twenty-six residents were randomized to VBL (n=13) or TL (n=13). Knowledge score improvement following video (14.9%) versus lecture (14.1%) did not differ significantly between the groups (P=.74). Comfort score improvement also did not differ (P=.64) between video (18.3%) and lecture groups (15.8%). In the practical skills assessment, the VBL group outperformed the TL group overall (70.4% vs 55.5%; P<.0001), with significantly better performance in donning PPE and decontamination. Although not part of the original study design, a three-month post-hoc analysis was performed. When comparing the pre-intervention and three-month post-hoc performances, there were no significant differences in knowledge increases between VBL versus TL (P=.41) or in comfort (P=.39).Video modules can be as effective as TL when utilized to train Emergency Medicine residents in the ACEP disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination. Curtis HA , Trang K , Chason KW , Biddinger PD . Video-based learning vs traditional lecture for instructing emergency medicine residents in disaster medicine principles of mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):7-12.

    View details for DOI 10.1017/S1049023X1700718X

    View details for Web of Science ID 000428764900003

    View details for PubMedID 29317001