All Publications


  • Fine-mapping cis-regulatory variants in diverse human populations. eLife Tehranchi, A., Hie, B., Dacre, M., Kaplow, I., Pettie, K., Combs, P., Fraser, H. B. 2019; 8

    Abstract

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful approach for connecting genotype to phenotype. Most GWAS hits are located in cis-regulatory regions, but the underlying causal variants and their molecular mechanisms remain unknown. To better understand human cis-regulatory variation, we mapped quantitative trait loci for chromatin accessibility (caQTLs)-a key step in cis-regulation-in 1000 individuals from 10 diverse populations. Most caQTLs were shared across populations, allowing us to leverage the genetic diversity to fine-map candidate causal regulatory variants, several thousand of which have been previously implicated in GWAS. In addition, many caQTLs that affect the expression of distal genes also alter the landscape of long-range chromosomal interactions, suggesting a mechanism for long-range expression QTLs. In sum, our results show that molecular QTL mapping integrated across diverse populations provides a high-resolution view of how worldwide human genetic variation affects chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and phenotype.Editorial note: This article has been through an editorial process in which the authors decide how to respond to the issues raised during peer review. The Reviewing Editor's assessment is that minor issues remain unresolved (see decision letter).

    View details for PubMedID 30650056

  • Fine-mapping cis-regulatory variants in diverse human populations ELIFE Tehranchi, A., Hie, B., Dacre, M., Kaplow, I., Pettie, K., Combs, P., Fraser, H. B. 2019; 8
  • Regional patterns in ammonia-oxidizing communities throughout Chukchi Sea waters from the Bering Strait to the Beaufort Sea AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Damashek, J., Pettie, K. P., Brown, Z. W., Mills, M. M., Arrigo, K. R., Francis, C. A. 2017; 79 (3): 273–86

    View details for DOI 10.3354/ame01834

    View details for Web of Science ID 000406130800008