Bio


Website: http://web.stanford.edu/~kaiyug/.

My current research is to study climate change impacts and adaptations on crop production and food security in West African and US. Specifically, I am using empirical and process-based approaches to model drought and heat stress effects on staple crop production and assess possible adaptation pathways. I also work with Dr. Joe Berry on using satellite-based photosynthesis measurements to quantify crop productivity.

I got my PhD from Princeton University in the summer of 2013, and I worked with Prof. Eric F. Wood in the Land Surface Hydrology Research Group. I also closely worked with Prof. Kelly K. Caylor and Prof. David Medvigy. My PhD research focused on understanding how hydrological variability impact vegetation dynamics (vegetation phenology, ecosystem productivity, and biome distributions) in the African continent using multiple remote sensing datasets and ecosystem/land surface models (e.g. SEIB and VIC).

Honors & Awards


  • NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, NASA (2012)
  • Walbridge Fund Graduate Award, Princeton Environmental Institute (2012)
  • Best Student Paper Award, Phenology 2012 Conference, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (2012)
  • CUAHSI Pathfinnder Fellowship, Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) (2010)
  • National Undergraduate Scholarship, Ministry of Education, China (2007)
  • Pan Xueping Scholarship (Highest honor in Nanjing University), Nanjing University, China (2006)

Professional Education


  • Bachelor of Science, Nanjing University (2008)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Princeton University (2013)

Stanford Advisors


Journal Articles


  • Robust features of future climate change impacts on sorghum yields in West Africa ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Sultan, B., Guan, K., Kouressy, M., Biasutti, M., Piani, C., Hammer, G. L., McLean, G., Lobell, D. B. 2014; 9 (10)
  • Global Methane Emissions from Pit Latrines ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Reid, M. C., Guan, K., Wagner, F., Mauzerall, D. L. 2014; 48 (15): 8727-8734

    Abstract

    Pit latrines are an important form of decentralized wastewater management, providing hygienic and low-cost sanitation for approximately one-quarter of the global population. Latrines are also major sources of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) from the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter in pits. In this study, we develop a spatially explicit approach to account for local hydrological control over the anaerobic condition of latrines and use this analysis to derive a set of country-specific emissions factors and to estimate global pit latrine CH4 emissions. Between 2000 and 2015 we project global emissions to fall from 5.2 to 3.8 Tg y(-1), or from ∼ 2% to ∼ 1% of global anthropogenic CH4 emissions, due largely to urbanization in China. Two and a half billion people still lack improved sanitation services, however, and progress toward universal access to improved sanitation will likely drive future growth in pit latrine emissions. We discuss modeling results in the context of sustainable water, sanitation, and hygiene development and consider appropriate technologies to ensure hygienic sanitation while limiting CH4 emissions. We show that low-CH4 on-site alternatives like composting toilets may be price competitive with other CH4 mitigation measures in organic waste sectors, with marginal abatement costs ranging from 57 to 944 $/ton carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) in Africa and 46 to 97 $/ton CO2e in Asia.

    View details for DOI 10.1021/es501549h

    View details for Web of Science ID 000340080600049

    View details for PubMedID 24999745

  • Terrestrial hydrological controls on land surface phenology of African savannas and woodlands JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-BIOGEOSCIENCES Guan, K., Wood, E. F., Medvigy, D., Kimball, J., Pan, M., Caylor, K. K., Sheffield, J., Xu, X., Jones, M. O. 2014; 119 (8): 1652-1669
  • A DROUGHT MONITORING AND FORECASTING SYSTEM FOR SUB-SAHARA AFRICAN WATER RESOURCES AND FOOD SECURITY BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Sheffield, J., Wood, E. F., Chaney, N., Guan, K., Sadri, S., Yuan, X., Olang, L., Abou Amani, Ali, A., Demuth, S., Ogallo, L. 2014; 95 (6): 861-?
  • 2H isotopic flux partitioning of evapotranspiration over a grass field following a water pulse and subsequent dry down WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Good, S. P., Soderberg, K., Guan, K., King, E. G., Scanlon, T. M., Caylor, K. K. 2014; 50 (2): 1410-1432
  • Deriving Vegetation Phenological Time and Trajectory Information Over Africa Using SEVIRI Daily LAI IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING Guan, K., Medvigy, D., Wood, E. F., Caylor, K. K., Li, S., Jeong, S. 2014; 52 (2): 1113-1130
  • Continental-scale impacts of intra-seasonal rainfall variability on simulated ecosystem responses in Africa Biogeosciences Guan, K., et al 2014: 6939-6954

    View details for DOI 10.5194/bg-11-6939-2014

  • Probabilistic Seasonal Forecasting of African Drought by Dynamical Models JOURNAL OF HYDROMETEOROLOGY Yuan, X., Wood, E. F., Chaney, N. W., Sheffield, J., Kam, J., Liang, M., Guan, K. 2013; 14 (6): 1706-1720
  • Seasonal coupling of canopy function and structure in African tropical forests and its environmental controls Ecosphere Guan, K., et al 2013; 4

    View details for DOI 10.1890/ES12-00232.1

  • Multi-sensor derivation of regional vegetation fractional cover in Africa REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT Guan, K., Wood, E. F., Caylor, K. K. 2012; 124: 653-665
  • Spatiotemporal scaling of hydrological and agrochemical export dynamics in a tile-drained Midwestern watershed WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH Guan, K., Thompson, S. E., Harman, C. J., Basu, N. B., Rao, P. S., Sivapalan, M., Packman, A. I., Kalita, P. K. 2011; 47