Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Stanford University, MI-PHD (2014)
  • Bachelor of Science, University of California Los Angeles, Microbio., Imm. and Mol. Gen. (2008)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • Host-Microbiota Interactions in the Pathogenesis of Antibiotic-Associated Diseases CELL REPORTS Lichtman, J. S., Ferreyra, J. A., Ng, K. M., Smits, S. A., Sonnenburg, J. L., Elias, J. E. 2016; 14 (5): 1049-1061

    Abstract

    Improved understanding of the interplay between host and microbes stands to illuminate new avenues for disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Here, we provide a high-resolution view of the dynamics between host and gut microbiota during antibiotic-induced intestinal microbiota depletion, opportunistic Salmonella typhimurium and Clostridium difficile pathogenesis, and recovery from these perturbed states in a mouse model. Host-centric proteome and microbial community profiles provide a nuanced longitudinal view, revealing the interdependence between host and microbiota in evolving dysbioses. Time- and condition-specific molecular and microbial signatures are evident and clearly distinguished from pathogen-independent inflammatory fingerprints. Our data reveal that mice recovering from antibiotic treatment or C. difficile infection retain lingering signatures of inflammation, despite compositional normalization of the microbiota, and host responses could be rapidly and durably relieved through fecal transplant. These experiments demonstrate insights that emerge from the combination of these orthogonal, untargeted approaches to the gastrointestinal ecosystem.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.01.009

    View details for Web of Science ID 000369616100009

    View details for PubMedID 26832403

  • The Enteric Two-Step: nutritional strategies of bacterial pathogens within the gut CELLULAR MICROBIOLOGY Ferreyra, J. A., Ng, K. M., Sonnenburg, J. L. 2014; 16 (7): 993-1003

    Abstract

    The gut microbiota is a dense and diverse microbial community governed by dynamic microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions, the status of which influences whether enteric pathogens can cause disease. Here we review recent insights into the key roles that nutrients play in bacterial pathogen exploitation of the gut microbial ecosystem. We synthesize recent findings to support a five-stage model describing the transition between a healthy microbiota and one dominated by a pathogen and disease. Within this five-stage model, two stages are critical to the pathogen: (i) an initial expansion phase that must occur in the absence of pathogen-induced inflammation, followed by (ii) pathogen-promoting physiological changes such as inflammation and diarrhoea. We discuss how this emerging paradigm of pathogen life within the lumen of the gut is giving rise to novel therapeutic strategies.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/cmi.12300

    View details for Web of Science ID 000337667600002

  • Microbiota-liberated host sugars facilitate post-antibiotic expansion of enteric pathogens. Nature Ng, K. M., Ferreyra, J. A., Higginbottom, S. K., Lynch, J. B., Kashyap, P. C., Gopinath, S., Naidu, N., Choudhury, B., Weimer, B. C., Monack, D. M., Sonnenburg, J. L. 2013; 502 (7469): 96-99

    Abstract

    The human intestine, colonized by a dense community of resident microbes, is a frequent target of bacterial pathogens. Undisturbed, this intestinal microbiota provides protection from bacterial infections. Conversely, disruption of the microbiota with oral antibiotics often precedes the emergence of several enteric pathogens. How pathogens capitalize upon the failure of microbiota-afforded protection is largely unknown. Here we show that two antibiotic-associated pathogens, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and Clostridium difficile, use a common strategy of catabolizing microbiota-liberated mucosal carbohydrates during their expansion within the gut. S. typhimurium accesses fucose and sialic acid within the lumen of the gut in a microbiota-dependent manner, and genetic ablation of the respective catabolic pathways reduces its competitiveness in vivo. Similarly, C. difficile expansion is aided by microbiota-induced elevation of sialic acid levels in vivo. Colonization of gnotobiotic mice with a sialidase-deficient mutant of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a model gut symbiont, reduces free sialic acid levels resulting in C. difficile downregulating its sialic acid catabolic pathway and exhibiting impaired expansion. These effects are reversed by exogenous dietary administration of free sialic acid. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment of conventional mice induces a spike in free sialic acid and mutants of both Salmonella and C. difficile that are unable to catabolize sialic acid exhibit impaired expansion. These data show that antibiotic-induced disruption of the resident microbiota and subsequent alteration in mucosal carbohydrate availability are exploited by these two distantly related enteric pathogens in a similar manner. This insight suggests new therapeutic approaches for preventing diseases caused by antibiotic-associated pathogens.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nature12503

    View details for PubMedID 23995682