All Publications


  • Quality of Life in Physical, Social, and Cognitive Domains Improves With Endovascular Therapy in the DEFUSE 3 Trial. Stroke Polding, L. C., Tate, W. J., Mlynash, M. n., Marks, M. P., Heit, J. J., Christensen, S. n., Kemp, S. n., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G. 2021: STROKEAHA120031490

    Abstract

    The DEFUSE 3 (Endovascular Therapy Following Imaging Evaluation for Ischemic Stroke 3) randomized clinical trial demonstrated the efficacy of endovascular therapy in treating ischemic stroke 6 to 16 hours after onset, resulting in better functional outcomes than standard medical therapy alone. The objective of this secondary analysis is to analyze the effect of late-window endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke on quality of life (QoL) outcomes.Patients (n=182) who presented between 6 and 16 hours after they were last known to be well with acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke were randomized to endovascular thrombectomy plus standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone and followed-up through 90 days poststroke. QoL at day 90 was assessed with the QoL in Neurological Disorders measurement tool.Of the 146 subjects alive at day 90, 136 (95%) filled out QoL in Neurological Disorders short forms. Patients treated with endovascular therapy had better QoL scores in each domain: mobility, social participation, cognitive function, and depression (P<0.01 for all). Variables other than endovascular therapy that were independently associated with better QoL included lower baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, younger age, and male sex. The degree to which the modified Rankin Scale captures differences in QoL between patients varied by domain; the modified Rankin Scale score accounted for a high proportion of the variability in mobility (Rs2=0.82), a moderate proportion in social participation (Rs2=0.62), and a low proportion in cognition (Rs2=0.31) and depression (Rs2=0.19).Patients treated with endovascular therapy 6 to 16 hours after stroke have better QoL than patients treated with medical therapy alone, including better mobility, more social participation, superior cognition, and less depression. The modified Rankin Scale fails to capture patients' outcomes in cognition and depression, which should therefore be assessed with dedicated QoL tools.URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02586415.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.031490

    View details for PubMedID 33596675

  • High detection rate and low efficacy in controlling high blood pressure (≥130/80 mmHg) in the community-based health screening: results from KDSAP. European journal of preventive cardiology Jiang, M., Zhuo, M., Mothi, S. S., Song, R., Polding, L. C., Li, J., Cho, A., Hsiao, L. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.1093/eurjpc/zwaa085

    View details for PubMedID 33624035

  • High Prevalence and Low Awareness of Albuminuria in the Community Setting in the KDSAP. Kidney international reports Zhuo, M., Jiang, M., Song, R., Mothi, S. S., Bellou, S., Polding, L. C., Li, J., Cho, A., Hsiao, L. 2020; 5 (4): 475–84

    Abstract

    Introduction: Albuminuria is a sign of kidney disease and associated with adverse outcomes. However, most individuals with albuminuria are unaware of it. The Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP) aims for early detection and raising awareness of albuminuria, targeting underserved populations in communities. This study will assess the prevalence and awareness of albuminuria and identify associated risk factors among KDSAP participants.Methods: KDSAP participants≥18 years old without a history of dialysis or kidney transplant were included. Albuminuria was identified by dipstick urinalysis. Individuals with albuminuria who answered yes to either of the following 2 questions were defined as being aware: (i) Have you ever had protein in the urine? (ii) Do you have kidney disease?Results: Among 2304 participants, 461 (20.0%) had albuminuria: 16.3% with trace or 1+ (low degree) and 3.7% with 2+ or more (high degree). Correlating factors of albuminuria included young age, male sex, African American descent, self-reported diabetes, hypertension, family history of kidney disease, and smoking. Overall albuminuria awareness was 15.8%, but awareness inversely correlated to younger age groups: 7.0% for ages 18-39 years, 13.5% for ages 40-59 years, and 24.0% for ages≥60 years (P< 0.001). A high degree of albuminuria (vs. low, odds ratio: 5.04, P< 0.001) and concurrent hematuria (odds ratio: 2.12, P=0.024) were both associated with higher awareness; conversely, risk factors for low awareness included African American and better self-assessments of health.Conclusions: There was a high albuminuria prevalence among KDSAP participants, yet low awareness. KDSAP can potentially be a useful model for detecting albuminuria and raising awareness in communities.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ekir.2019.12.011

    View details for PubMedID 32280843

  • Thrombectomy Results in Reduced Hospital Stay, More Home-Time, and More Favorable Living Situations in DEFUSE 3. Stroke Tate, W. J., Polding, L. C., Kemp, S., Mlynash, M., Heit, J. J., Marks, M. P., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G. 2019: STROKEAHA119025165

    Abstract

    Background and Purpose- The DEFUSE 3 trial (Endovascular Therapy Following Imaging Evaluation for Ischemic Stroke) demonstrated that endovascular thrombectomy in the 6- to 16-hour time window improves functional outcomes of patients with evidence of salvageable tissue on baseline computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of endovascular therapy on length of hospital stay, home-time during the first 3 months poststroke, and living situation poststroke in DEFUSE 3. Methods- Duration of hospital stay and home-time (number of days during the 90-day poststroke period that the patient resides in their own home or in that of a relative) were compared between treatment groups using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Patient living situation was assessed at discharge, 30 days, and 90 days on an ordinal 4-point scale (home, acute rehabilitation unit, institutionalized care, or hospice/death) and differences between groups were analyzed using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. Results- Median length of hospital stay was 9.1 (interquartile range, 6.2-15.0) days in the medical group versus 6.5 (interquartile range, 3.7-9.3) days in the endovascular group ( P<0.001). Median home-time during the first 90 days after stroke was 0 (interquartile range, 0-53) days in the medical group versus 55 (interquartile range, 0-83) days in the endovascular group ( P<0.001). The endovascular group had more favorable living situations at time of discharge ( P<0.001), 30 days ( P<0.001), and 90 days ( P<0.001) poststroke. Conclusions- Endovascular thrombectomy resulted in reduced hospital stay, more home-time, and more desirable living situations in the 90 days after stroke. These results provide evidence that endovascular therapy in the delayed time window can improve quality of life for stroke patients and reduce healthcare costs. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT02586415.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.119.025165

    View details for PubMedID 31288666

  • Thrombectomy Results in Reduced Hospital Stay, More Time at Home, and More Favorable Living Situations for Patients in the DEFUSE 3 Trial. Tate, W. J., Polding, L. C., Kemp, S., Mlynash, M., Heit, J. J., Marks, M. P., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019
  • Improved Quality of Life With Endovascular Therapy in the DEFUSE 3 Trial Polding, L. C., Tate, W. J., Mlynash, M., Marks, M. P., Heit, J. J., Kemp, S., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019
  • Later Imaging More Accurately Captures Infarct Growth in DEFUSE 3 Tate, W. J., Polding, L. C., Christensen, S., Mlynash, M., Heit, J. J., Marks, M. M., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019
  • Correlation between Modified Rankin Scale and Quality of Life in DEFUSE 3 Polding, L. C., Tate, W. J., Mlynash, M., Marks, M. P., Heit, J. J., Kemp, S., Albers, G. W., Lansberg, M. G. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019