Honors & Awards


  • National Endeavor Fellowship, Ministry of Education, People's Republic of China (2007)
  • First Prize of the Scholarship/Honor Student, Jilin University (2008)
  • National Scholarship, Ministry of Education, People's Republic of China (2009)
  • First Prize of the Scholarship, Peking University (2010-2012)
  • Graduate Scholarship, Joint Research Fund for Overseas Natural Science of China, NSFC (2014-2015)

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Peking University Health Science Center (2015)

Stanford Advisors


Patents


  • Liyang Cui, Yan Liu, Lirong Teng, Lingjun Meng, Qingfan Meng etc. "China P.Rep. Patent CN 101390958 B Huidouba traditional Chinese medicine composite preparation for treating wound, cut trauma, scald and burn", Jan 20, 2011
  • Liyang Cui, Yan Liu, Lirong Teng, Lingjun Meng, Qingfan Meng etc. "China P.Rep. Patent CN 101390882 Huidouba extract and preparation method and pharmaceutical use", Oct 13, 2010

Lab Affiliations


All Publications


  • A near-infrared phosphorescent nanoprobe enables quantitative, longitudinal imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics during radiotherapy. Cancer research Zheng, X., Cui, L., Chen, M., Soto, L. A., Graves, E. E., Rao, J. 2019

    Abstract

    Hypoxia plays a key role in tumor resistance to radiotherapy (RT). It is important to study hypoxia dynamics during RT to improve treatment planning and prognosis. Here, we describe a luminescent nanoprobe, composed of a fluorescent semiconducting polymer and palladium (Pd) complex, for quantitative longitudinal imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics during RT. The nanoprobe was designed to provide high sensitivity and reversible response for the subtle change in hypoxia over a narrow range (0-30 mmHg O2), which spans the oxygen range where tumors have limited radiosensitivity. Following intravenous administration, the nanoprobe efficiently accumulated in and distributed across the tumor, including the hypoxic region. The ratio between emissions at 700 and 800 nm provided quantitative mapping of hypoxia across the entire tumor. The nanoprobe has been applied to image the tumor hypoxia dynamics over 7 days during fractionated RT, revealing that high fractional dose (10 Gy) was more effective in improving tumor reoxygenation than low dose (2 Gy) and the effect tended to persist longer in smaller or more radiosensitive tumors. Our results also indicated the importance of the reoxygenation efficiency of the first fraction in the prediction of the radiation treatment outcome. In summary, this work has established a new nanoprobe for highly sensitive, quantitative and longitudinal imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics following RT, and demonstrated its value for assessing the efficacy of RT and radiation treatment planning.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-19-0530

    View details for PubMedID 31311808

  • Janus Iron Oxides @ Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticle Tracer for Cell Tracking by Magnetic Particle Imaging NANO LETTERS Song, G., Chen, M., Zhang, Y., Cui, L., Qu, H., Zheng, X., Wintermark, M., Liu, Z., Rao, J. 2018; 18 (1): 182–89

    Abstract

    Iron oxides nanoparticles tailored for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) have been synthesized, and their MPI signal intensity is three-times that of commercial MPI contrast (Ferucarbotran, also called Vivotrax) and seven-times that of MRI contrast (Feraheme) at the same Fe concentration. MPI tailored iron oxide nanoparticles were encapsulated with semiconducting polymers to produce Janus nanoparticles that possessed optical and magnetic properties for MPI and fluorescence imaging. Janus particles were applied to cancer cell labeling and in vivo tracking, and as few as 250 cells were imaged by MPI after implantation, corresponding to an amount of 7.8 ng of Fe. Comparison with MRI and fluorescence imaging further demonstrated the advantages of our Janus particles for MPI-super sensitivity, unlimited tissue penetration, and linear quantitativity.

    View details for PubMedID 29232142

  • Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-NANOMEDICINE AND NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY Cui, L., Rao, J. 2017; 9 (2)

    Abstract

    As an emerging class of optical nanomaterials, semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) are highly photostable, optically active and versatile in chemistry; these properties make them attractive as molecular imaging agents to enable imaging of biological events and functionalities at multiple scales. More recently, a variety of SPNs have been found to exhibit high photoacoustic properties, and further empowered photoacoustic imaging for contrast enhanced in vivo molecular imaging. Target-sensitive components can be incorporated in the SPNs to create activatable imaging probes to sense and monitor the target dynamics in living objects. Intrinsically biophotonic and biocompatible, SPNs can be further engineered for multimodal imaging and for real-time imaging of drug delivery. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/wnan.1418

    View details for Web of Science ID 000397857100003

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5192001

  • Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles as photoacoustic molecular imaging probes. Wiley interdisciplinary reviews. Nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology Cui, L., Rao, J. 2016

    Abstract

    As an emerging class of optical nanomaterials, semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) are highly photostable, optically active and versatile in chemistry; these properties make them attractive as molecular imaging agents to enable imaging of biological events and functionalities at multiple scales. More recently, a variety of SPNs have been found to exhibit high photoacoustic properties, and further empowered photoacoustic imaging for contrast enhanced in vivo molecular imaging. Target-sensitive components can be incorporated in the SPNs to create activatable imaging probes to sense and monitor the target dynamics in living objects. Intrinsically biophotonic and biocompatible, SPNs can be further engineered for multimodal imaging and for real-time imaging of drug delivery. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/wnan.1418

    View details for PubMedID 27346564

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5192001