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  • We Want You Back: Uncovering the Effects on In-Person Instructional Operations in Fall 2020 RESEARCH IN HIGHER EDUCATION Collier, D. A., Fitzpatrick, D., Dell, M., Snideman, S. S., Marsicano, C. R., Kelchen, R., Wells, K. E. 2021
  • The Hidden Costs of Corroboration: Estimating the Effects of Financial Aid Verification on College Enrollment EDUCATIONAL EVALUATION AND POLICY ANALYSIS Lee, J. C., Dell, M., Gonzalez Canche, M. S., Monday, A., Klafehn, A. 2021
  • We Want You Back: Uncovering the Effects on In-Person Instructional Operations in Fall 2020. Research in higher education Collier, D. A., Fitzpatrick, D., Dell, M., Snideman, S. S., Marsicano, C. R., Kelchen, R., Wells, K. E. 2021: 1-27

    Abstract

    Postsecondary institutions' responses to COVID-19 are a topic of immediate relevance. Emergent research suggests that partisanship was more strongly linked to institutions offering in-person instruction for Fall 2020 than was COVID-19. Using data from the College Crisis Initiative and a multiple group structural equation modeling approach, we tested the relationships between our outcome of interest (in-person instruction in Fall 2020) and state and county sociopolitical features, state and county COVID-19 rates, and state revenue losses. Our full-sample model suggested that County Political Preferences had the strongest association with in-person instruction, followed by Pandemic Severity and State Sociopolitical Features. Because institutional sectors may be uniquely sensitive to these factors, we tested our models separately on 4-year public, 4-year private, and 2-year public and 2-year private institutions. State Sociopolitical Features were significantly related to in-person instruction for 4-year private and 2-year public institutions but were strongest for 4-year public institutions. For 4-year private and 2-year public institutions, County Political Preferences' effect sizes were 2-3 times stronger than effects from State Sociopolitical Features. Pandemic Severity was significantly, negatively related to in-person instruction for 4-year private and 2-year public institutions-similar in magnitude to State Sociopolitical Features. Our analysis revealed that COVID-19 played a stronger role in determining in-person instruction in Fall 2020 than initial research using less sophisticated methods suggested-and while State Sociopolitical Features may have played a role in the decision, 4-year private and 2-year public institutions were more sensitive to county-level preferences.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11162-021-09665-5

    View details for PubMedID 34866763

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8631564