Bio


Nidia Ruedas-Gracia (nrgracia@stanford.edu) is a doctoral candidate in Developmental and Psychological Sciences at Stanford University. She earned a BA from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in Psychology and Sociology. Nidia also earned a MA from New York University (NYU) in Human Development and Social Intervention. Her advisors are Drs. Teresa LaFromboise and Eric Bettinger. Her research interests include the sociocultural factors (e.g., sense of belonging) that impact the academic performance and psychological development of historically marginalized students in higher education. She is also interested in informing and developing culturally-sustaining interventions for historically marginalized college students, specifically those who are first-generation/low-income (FLI).

Honors & Awards


  • Ford Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellowship: Honorable Mention, Ford Foundation (2014)
  • The Thomas Frederic Humiston Fellowship, Stanford University (2014)
  • The Canfield Foundation Fellowship, Canfield Foundation (2014)
  • Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE) Fellowship, Stanford University (2014-Present)
  • Stanford Graduate Training Fellowship in Quantitative Education Policy Analysis, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education (2016-2018)
  • Division 45 Travel Award, American Psychological Association (2017)
  • Student Travel Award, American Psychological Association (2017)
  • Institute for Research in the Social Sciences Fellowship, Stanford University Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (2016-2017)

Professional Affiliations and Activities


  • Member, Society for Research in Child Development (2016 - Present)
  • Student Scholarship Co-Chair, APA Division 45 Conference Planning Committee (2016 - 2016)
  • Graduate Student Member, American Psychological Association (2015 - Present)

Education & Certifications


  • M.A., New York University, Human Development and Social Intervention (2014)
  • B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, Sociology (2012)
  • B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, Psychology (2012)

Stanford Advisors


Service, Volunteer and Community Work


  • Co-President, Stanford University/ GRAD First-Generation Low-Income Partnership

    Location

    Stanford, CA

  • Community Co-Chair, Stanford University Graduate School of Education Guild (Graduate Student Organization)

    Location

    Stanford, CA

  • Mentor, Stanford University Frosh Scholars Program

    Location

    Stanford, CA

  • Mentor, Stanford University/Graduate School of Education Mentorship Program

    Location

    520 Galvez Mall Stanford, CA 94305

All Publications


  • CONCEPTUALIZING SCHOOL BELONGINGNESS IN NATIVE YOUTH: FACTOR ANALYSIS OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL SENSE OF SCHOOL MEMBERSHIP SCALE AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH Hussain, S., Domingue, B. W., LaFromboise, T., Ruedas-Gracia, N. 2018; 25 (3): 26–51

    Abstract

    The Psychological Sense of School Membership (PSSM) scale is widely used to measure school belongingness among adolescents. However, previous studies identify inconsistencies in factor structures across different populations. The factor structure of the PSSM has yet to be examined with American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth, a population of keen interest given reports of their educational and health disparities, and the potential of belongingness as a protective factor against risk behaviors. Thus, this study examined the factor structure of the PSSM in two samples of AI adolescents (N = 349). The two main aims of this study were to 1) determine if a comparable factor structure exists between the two AI groups and 2) examine the factor structure of the PSSM for use in AI/AN populations. Randomization analysis was used to test research aim one, and exploratory factor analysis was used to test research aim two. Analyses revealed that comparable factor structures existed based on responses from the two AI groups. Analyses also identified two factors: school identification/peer support and connection with teachers. Moreover, negatively worded statements were found to be unreliable and were removed from the final scale, reducing the PSSM to 13 items. Findings from this study will assist researchers and clinicians with assessing sense of school belongingness in AI/AN adolescents and with appropriately interpreting aspects of belongingness for this population.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000447634800002

    View details for PubMedID 30320875

  • Disparate Cultural Values and Modes of Conflict Resolution in Peer Relations: The Experience of Latino First-Generation College Students HISPANIC JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Burgos-Cienfuegos, R., Vasquez-Salgado, Y., Ruedas-Gracia, N., Greenfield, P. M. 2015; 37 (3): 365-397