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  • Changing the Landscape of Obstetric Resident Education in LMIC Using Simulation-Based Training. International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Meza, P. K., Bianco, K., Herrarte, E., Daniels, K. 2020

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluate simulation-based training (SBT) in low-and-middle-income countries (LMIC) and the long-term retention of knowledge and self-efficacy.METHODS: We conducted a SBT course on the management of post-partum hemorrhage (PPH), shoulder dystocia (SD), and maternal cardiac arrest (MCA) in three governmental teaching hospitals in Guatemala. We evaluated changes in knowledge and self-efficacy using a multiple-choice questionnaire (MCQ) for 46 OB/GYN residents. A paired Student t-test was used to analyze changes at one week and six months after the SBT.RESULTS: There was an increase in scores in clinical knowledge of MCA, P <0. 001, 95% CI [0.81, 1.49], and SD, P<0.001, 95% CI [0.41, 1.02] one week following SBT and a statistically insignificant increase in PPH scores, P= 0.617, 95% CI [-0.96, 0.60]. This increase in scores was maintained after six months, for MCA, P< 0.001, 95% CI [0.69, 1.53], SD, P= 0.02 95% CI [0.07-0.85] and PPH, P=0.04 95% CI [0.01, 1.26]. For MCA and SD levels of self-efficacy were increased one-week following training, P<0.001 95% CI [0.83, 2.30] and P= 0.008 95% CI [0.60, 3.92], respectively, and at six-months P<0.001 95% CI [0.79, 2.42] and P= 0.006 95% CI [0.66, 3.81], respectively. There was a slight increase in PPH self-efficacy scores one-week after SBT, P=0.73, 95% CI [-6.05, 4.41], maintained after six-months P= 0.38 95% CI [-6.85, 2.85].CONCLUSION: SBT was found to be an effective and feasible method to increase short and long-term clinical knowledge and self-efficacy of obstetric emergencies in LMIC.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ijgo.13526

    View details for PubMedID 33314149

  • Changing the Landscape of Obstetric Resident Education in LMIC Using Simulation Based Training Meza, P. K., Bianco, K., Herrarte, E., Daniels, K. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2020: 80S
  • Waiting it out: consultation delays prolong in-patient length of stay. Postgraduate medical journal Rahman, A. S., Shi, S. n., Meza, P. K., Jia, J. L., Svec, D. n., Shieh, L. n. 2019

    Abstract

    Decreasing delays for hospitalised patients results in improved hospital efficiency, increased quality of care and decreased healthcare expenditures. Delays in subspecialty consultations and procedures can cause increased length of stay due to reasons outside of necessary medical care.To quantify, describe and record reasons for delays in consultations and procedures for patients on the general medicine wards.We conducted weekly audits of all admitted patients on five Internal Medicine teams over 8 weeks. A survey was reviewed with attending physicians and residents on five internal medicine teams to identify patients with a delay due to consultation or procedure, quantify length of delay and record reason for delay.During the study period, 316 patients were reviewed and 48 were identified as experiencing a total of 53 delays due to consultations or procedures. The average delay was 1.8 days for a combined total of 83 days. Top reasons for delays included scheduling, late response to page and a busy service. The frequency in length of consult delays vary among different specialties. The highest frequency of delays was clustered in procedure-heavy specialties.This report highlights the importance of reviewing system barriers that lead to delayed service in hospitals. Addressing these delays could lead to reductions in length of stay for inpatients.

    View details for PubMedID 30674619