All Publications


  • Short-Term Safety of the Direct Superior Approach for Total Hip Arthroplasty. Surgical technology international Ezzibdeh, R. M., Barrett, A., Arora, P., Kaplan, L., Roger, D., Ward, D., Mas Martinez, J. J., Amanatullah, D. F. 2019; 36

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION: Minimally invasive surgery total hip arthroplasty (MIS-THA) is becoming increasingly popular. There are several approaches to MIS-THA that vary according to anatomical access to the hip joint. The direct superior (DS) approach is a recent modification of an MIS posterior approach that spares the iliotibial band and most of the short external rotators of the hip, particularly the quadratus femoris. While FDA approved, there is a lack of data in the current literature on DS outcomes and the safety of this approach is yet to be systematically evaluated.MATERIALS AND METHODS: The goal of this study is to provide a quantitative analysis of the safety and complications of primary DS-total hip arthroplasty at 90 days post-surgery through a retrospective multicenter case series of 301 patients. Special attention was given to intra- and postoperative complications, readmissions, mean operative time, hospital-stay length, and postoperative ambulation distance.RESULTS: Surgical complications included three (1%) intraoperative calcar fractures and four (1%) postoperative peri-prosthetic fractures. The postoperative medical complication rate was 3% with four (1%) patients requiring readmission. The mean operative time was 70 ± 19 minutes, hospital-stay length 41 ± 19 hours, and the estimated blood loss (EBL) was 213 ± 129 ml. There were no acute episodes of instability at 90-day follow up. The intra- and postoperative results are similar with those reported in the literature for both the anterior and posterior approaches.CONCLUSION: This study indicates that the DS approach appears to be safe with a low complication rate at 90 days that is comparable to more conventional approaches, such as the direct anterior and posterior techniques. This information is also valuable for the evaluation of reimbursements for DS-THA as current bundled-payment models heavily emphasize 90-day outcomes and complications. Long-term direct comparative studies with the anterior and posterior approaches is required to fully evaluate DS-THAs.

    View details for PubMedID 31821527

  • Utilization of a pneumatic exoskeleton after total knee arthroplasty. Arthroplasty today Ezzibdeh, R., Arora, P., Amanatullah, D. F. 2019; 5 (3): 314–15

    Abstract

    Exoskeletons are wearable, powered devices intended to support and augment limb function. With the aging population and increasing demand for total knee arthroplasty, exoskeletons could prove a valuable tool for regaining function and minimizing the number of patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities. However, the safety of these devices in postoperative populations remains unexplored. A lightweight pneumatic device was piloted on three patients after primary total knee arthroplasty. The patients were asked to perform simple locomotive tasks followed by a questionnaire to assess their experience and safety using the exoskeleton. All patients indicated the exoskeleton did not interfere with their wound and made them feel stable on their feet, and two of the three patients stated it was manageable and safe to operate. This report pilots the general safety of a pneumatic exoskeleton, laying the groundwork for larger and more comprehensive studies.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.artd.2019.02.008

    View details for PubMedID 31516973

  • DIRECT SUPERIOR APPROACH TO THE HIP FOR TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY JBJS ESSENTIAL SURGICAL TECHNIQUES Barrett, A. A., Ezzibdeh, R. M., Horst, P. K., Roger, D. J., Amanatullah, D. F. 2019; 9 (2)