Bio


How does a changing epidemic landscape impact people's perceptions of risk and their behavior? How might these changes impact disease dynamics? These questions are more complex than they seem because they involve endogenous, interacting elements in a system.

Ronan studies the interaction between the environment, infectious disease dynamics, and human behavior change. He utilizes techniques from geography and global health in empirical work on Ebola Virus Disease in Liberia and HIV in Uganda. He also utilizes mathematical biology.and nonlinear dynamics tools to model these interacting complex systems.

All Publications


  • Contact structure, mobility, environmental impact and behaviour: the importance of social forces to infectious disease dynamics and disease ecology PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Arthur, R. F., Gurley, E. S., Salje, H., Bloomfield, L. S., Jones, J. H. 2017; 372 (1719)

    Abstract

    Human factors, including contact structure, movement, impact on the environment and patterns of behaviour, can have significant influence on the emergence of novel infectious diseases and the transmission and amplification of established ones. As anthropogenic climate change alters natural systems and global economic forces drive land-use and land-cover change, it becomes increasingly important to understand both the ecological and social factors that impact infectious disease outcomes for human populations. While the field of disease ecology explicitly studies the ecological aspects of infectious disease transmission, the effects of the social context on zoonotic pathogen spillover and subsequent human-to-human transmission are comparatively neglected in the literature. The social sciences encompass a variety of disciplines and frameworks for understanding infectious diseases; however, here we focus on four primary areas of social systems that quantitatively and qualitatively contribute to infectious diseases as social-ecological systems. These areas are social mixing and structure, space and mobility, geography and environmental impact, and behaviour and behaviour change. Incorporation of these social factors requires empirical studies for parametrization, phenomena characterization and integrated theoretical modelling of social-ecological interactions. The social-ecological system that dictates infectious disease dynamics is a complex system rich in interacting variables with dynamically significant heterogeneous properties. Future discussions about infectious disease spillover and transmission in human populations need to address the social context that affects particular disease systems by identifying and measuring qualitatively important drivers.This article is part of the themed issue 'Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission'.

    View details for DOI 10.1098/rstb.2016.0454

    View details for Web of Science ID 000397800300016

    View details for PubMedID 28289265

  • Contact structure, mobility, environmental impact and behaviour: the importance of social forces to infectious disease dynamics and disease ecology Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Arthur, R. F., Gurley, E. S., Salje, H., Bloomfield, L. S., Jones, J. H. 2016; 372 (1719)

    View details for DOI 10.1098/rstb.2016.0454

  • Understanding Tribal Fates SCIENCE Arthur, R., Diamond, J. 2011; 334 (6058): 911-912

    View details for DOI 10.1126/science.1213787

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297101800033

    View details for PubMedID 22096177