Professional Education


  • Bachelor of Science, Universita Degli Studi Di Napoli (2008)
  • Master of Science, Universita Degli Studi Di Napoli (2010)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Universita Degli Studi Di Napoli (2014)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • Highly Efficient and Marker-free Genome Editing of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by CRISPR-Cas9 RNP and AAV6 Donor-Mediated Homologous Recombination. Cell stem cell Martin, R. M., Ikeda, K., Cromer, M. K., Uchida, N., Nishimura, T., Romano, R., Tong, A. J., Lemgart, V. T., Camarena, J., Pavel-Dinu, M., Sindhu, C., Wiebking, V., Vaidyanathan, S., Dever, D. P., Bak, R. O., Laustsen, A., Lesch, B. J., Jakobsen, M. R., Sebastiano, V., Nakauchi, H., Porteus, M. H. 2019; 24 (5): 821

    Abstract

    Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provides powerful opportunities for invitro disease modeling, drug discovery, and personalized stem cell-based therapeutics. Currently, only small edits can be engineered with high frequency, while larger modifications suffer from low efficiency and a resultant need for selection markers. Here, we describe marker-free genome editing in hPSCs using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) in combination with AAV6-mediated DNA repair template delivery. We report highly efficient and bi-allelic integration frequencies across multiple loci and hPSC lines, achieving mono-allelic editing frequencies of up to 94% at the HBB locus. Using this method, we show robust bi-allelic correction of homozygous sickle cell mutations in a patient-derived induced PSC (iPSC) line. Thus, this strategy shows significant utility for generating hPSCs with large gene integrations and/or single-nucleotide changes at high frequency and without the need for introducing selection genes, enhancing the applicability of hPSC editing for research and translational uses.

    View details for PubMedID 31051134

  • Highly Efficient and Marker-free Genome Editing of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by CRISPR-Cas9 RNP and AAV6 Donor-Mediated Homologous Recombination CELL STEM CELL Martin, R. M., Ikeda, K., Cromer, M., Uchida, N., Nishimura, T., Romano, R., Tong, A. J., Lemgart, V. T., Camarena, J., Pavel-Dinu, M., Sindhu, C., Wiebking, V., Vaidyanathan, S., Dever, D. P., Bak, R. O., Laustsen, A., Lesch, B. J., Jakobsen, M. R., Sebastiano, V., Nakauchi, H., Porteus, M. H. 2019; 24 (5): 821-+
  • Identification of preexisting adaptive immunity to Cas9 proteins in humans. Nature medicine Charlesworth, C. T., Deshpande, P. S., Dever, D. P., Camarena, J., Lemgart, V. T., Cromer, M. K., Vakulskas, C. A., Collingwood, M. A., Zhang, L., Bode, N. M., Behlke, M. A., Dejene, B., Cieniewicz, B., Romano, R., Lesch, B. J., Gomez-Ospina, N., Mantri, S., Pavel-Dinu, M., Weinberg, K. I., Porteus, M. H. 2019

    Abstract

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system is a powerful tool for genome editing, which allows the precise modification of specific DNA sequences. Many efforts are underway to use the CRISPR-Cas9 system to therapeutically correct human genetic diseases1-6. The most widely used orthologs of Cas9 are derived from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes5,7. Given that these two bacterial species infect the human population at high frequencies8,9, we hypothesized that humans may harbor preexisting adaptive immune responses to the Cas9 orthologs derived from these bacterial species, SaCas9 (S. aureus) and SpCas9 (S. pyogenes). By probing human serum for the presence of anti-Cas9 antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we detected antibodies against both SaCas9 and SpCas9 in 78% and 58% of donors, respectively. We also found anti-SaCas9 T cells in 78% and anti-SpCas9 T cells in 67% of donors, which demonstrates a high prevalence of antigen-specific T cells against both orthologs. We confirmed that these T cells were Cas9-specific by demonstrating a Cas9-specific cytokine response following isolation, expansion, and antigen restimulation. Together, these data demonstrate that there are preexisting humoral and cell-mediated adaptive immune responses to Cas9 in humans, a finding that should be taken into account as the CRISPR-Cas9 system moves toward clinical trials.

    View details for PubMedID 30692695

  • Genome Editing for IL-10 Deficiency in Purified Hematopoietic Stem Cells Romano, R., Pavel-Dinu, M., Bacchetta, R., Porteus, M. H., Roncarolo, M. CELL PRESS. 2018: 237–38