Bio


Samy Sekar is a PhD student in the interdisciplinary environment and resources program (E-IPER) and a David and Lucille Packard Foundation Fellow. She researches how to estimate public opinion at state and local levels, so that public opinion data is more relevant for policymakers. She also studies how people form their attitudes toward climate change and how those attitudes shape behavior.

Prior to joining Stanford University, Samy was a research assistant for the environmental policy think tank, Resources for the Future, where she worked on the team which helped design President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. She also completed Masters degrees in environmental science and applied economics from The Ohio State University, during which she conducted a two year research project in rural India testing the impacts of a carbon negative soil amendment on soil quality and crop growth. Samy was a recipient of the national Morris K. and Stewart L. Udall Scholarship for her work as a leader on environmental issues, advocating for numerous sustainability initiatives on campus as well as working with state policy makers to support clean energy development in Ohio.

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Samy researches how to estimate public opinion at state and local levels, so that public opinion data is more relevant for policymakers. She also studies how people form their attitudes toward climate change and how those attitudes shape behavior.

All Publications


  • An Analysis of Costs and Health Co-Benefits for a US Power Plant Carbon Standard PLOS ONE Buonocore, J. J., Lambert, K. F., Burtraw, D., Sekar, S., Driscoll, C. T. 2016; 11 (6)

    Abstract

    Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants can have important "co-benefits" for public health by reducing emissions of air pollutants. Here, we examine the costs and health co-benefits, in monetary terms, for a policy that resembles the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan. We then examine the spatial distribution of the co-benefits and costs, and the implications of a range of cost assumptions in the implementation year of 2020. Nationwide, the total health co-benefits were $29 billion 2010 USD (95% CI: $2.3 to $68 billion), and net co-benefits under our central cost case were $12 billion (95% CI: -$15 billion to $51 billion). Net co-benefits for this case in the implementation year were positive in 10 of the 14 regions studied. The results for our central case suggest that all but one region should experience positive net benefits within 5 years after implementation.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0156308

    View details for Web of Science ID 000377561000011

    View details for PubMedID 27270222

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4896433

  • Effects of Biochar and Anaerobic Digester Effluent on Soil Quality and Crop Growth in Karnataka, India Agricultural Research Sekar, S., Hottle, R. D., Lal, R. 2014; 3 (2): 137-147
  • Two world views on carbon revenues Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences Burtraw, D., Sekar, S. 2013; 4 (1): 110-120