Bio


Shannon is a marine social ecologist from San Diego, California. In her research, she blends theory and practice from the fields of anthropology, psychology, and ecology to address today’s most pressing marine conservation issues. Her work to date has focused on community-based management of marine resources in Southeast Asia and Oceania, primarily in the Philippines and Indonesia. She is a National Geographic Explorer and holds a B.S. in Biological Sciences and B.A. in Environmental Studies from UC Santa Barbara and a Masters in Coastal Management from Duke University. As a current PhD candidate in the Emmet Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources at Stanford University, she applies mixed methods from both the social and natural sciences. She also explores decolonizing participatory research methods using film and photography to engage community members as active and equal participants in the research process and to understand how coastal communities interact with their resources and how they can improve management to sustain their culture and livelihoods well into the future.

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Shannon studies artisanal fishing communities in small island nations in South East Asia and Oceania and how they make decisions around their resources, as well as how they are affected by international institutions and markets. These include the global aquarium trade, tourism, and conservation efforts such as marine protected areas. She is also interested in developing new qualitative methods of participatory research using film and photography.