Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Illinois Chicago (2017)
  • Bachelor of Arts and Science, Grambling State University (2011)

Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • The WELL diet score correlates with the alternative healthy eating index-2010 FOOD SCIENCE & NUTRITION Springfield, S., Cunanan, K., Heaney, C., Peng, K., Gardner, C. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.1002/fsn3.1558

    View details for Web of Science ID 000530379700001

  • Differences in Nutrient Intake and Diet Quality Between Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Men in the United States. Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974) Thompson, T. L., Singleton, C. R., Springfield, S. E., Thorpe, R. J., Odoms-Young, A. 2020: 33354920913058

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: Non-Hispanic black (NHB) men have higher rates of chronic disease than men in other racial/ethnic groups. Poor diet quality is one risk factor for chronic disease, but research on the diet quality and nutrient intake of NHB men is sparse. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the diet quality and nutrient intake of NHB and non-Hispanic white (NHW) men in the United States.METHODS: We analyzed cross-sectional data on 5050 men (31.3% NHB, 68.7% NHW) who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2007-2012. To assess diet quality, we calculated Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 scores from each participant's 24-hour recall data. We used logistic regression models to determine if NHB men had lower odds of meeting dietary recommendations for nutrient intake than NHW men. We used linear regression models to identify significant differences in HEI-2010 scores between NHB and NHW men.RESULTS: After adjusting for sociodemographic measures, NHB and NHW men had similar diet quality (P = .59). Compared with NHW men, NHB men had lower odds of meeting recommendations for dietary fiber and cholesterol intake and higher odds of meeting recommendations for saturated fat and sodium intake.CONCLUSION: Differences between NHB and NHW men in the intake of certain nutrients may be related to chronic disease disparities. Future research should consider racial/ethnic differences in dietary intake among men and the impact these differences have on men's health.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0033354920913058

    View details for PubMedID 32250708

  • Examining disparities in diet quality between SNAP participants and non-participants using Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis. Preventive medicine reports Singleton, C. R., Young, S. K., Kessee, N., Springfield, S. E., Sen, B. P. 2020; 19: 101134

    Abstract

    Recent studies have reported that SNAP participants have poorer diet quality than non-participants. This study aimed to examine how differences in socio-demographic, household, and health-related measures explain disparities in diet quality between SNAP participants and non-participants using Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis. We analyzed cross-sectional data on 14,331 adult respondents of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009 - 2014. To measure diet quality, we applied the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2015 to respondents' 24-hour dietary recall data (scale: 0-100 points). We used Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis to determine how much of the disparity in HEI-2015 total score between SNAP participants and non-participants was explained by socio-demographic (e.g., age, race/ethnicity, educational), household (e.g., household size, food security status), and health-related measures (e.g., BMI, smoking status). Analyses performed revealed significant differences in HEI-2015 total score by SNAP participation status (p < 0.001). We found that the total gap in HEI-2015 total score between SNAP participants and income-ineligible non-participants was 6.30 points. Socio-demographic measures alone explained 72.40% of the disparity. All measures together explained 86.31% of the disparity. The total gap between SNAP participants and income-eligible non-participants was 3.24 points. Socio-demographic measures alone explained 35.51% of this disparity while all measures together explained 56.86%. We observed disparities in diet quality between SNAP participants and non-participants. Socio-demographic, household, and health-related measures explained a significant amount of the disparity that existed between SNAP participants and income-ineligible non-participants; they explained less of the disparity between SNAP participants and income-eligible non-participants.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2020.101134

    View details for PubMedID 32528823

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7280767

  • The Relation of Optimism to Relative Telomere Length in Older Men and Women. Psychosomatic medicine Kim, E. S., Tindle, H. A., Kubzansky, L. D., Liu, S., Duncan, M. S., Manson, J. E., Springfield, S., Salmoirago-Blotcher, E., Shadyab, A. H., Liu, B., Grodstein, F., DeVivo, I. 2019

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: Mounting evidence suggests that higher optimism is associated with reduced risk of age-related morbidities and premature mortality. Yet, possible biological mechanisms underlying these associations remain understudied. One hypothesized mechanism is a slower rate of cellular aging, which in turn delays age-related declines in health.METHODS: We used data from two large cohort studies to test the hypothesis that higher optimism is associated with longer leukocyte telomere length. Using cross-sectional data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS; N=6,417; mean age=70 years) and the Women's Health Initiative (WHI; N=3,582; mean age=63 years), we used linear regression models to examine the association of optimism with relative telomere length (assessed in leukocytes from saliva [HRS] or plasma [WHI]). Models adjusted for sociodemographics, depression, health status, and health behaviors.RESULTS: Considering both optimism and telomere length as continuous variables, we found consistently null associations in both cohorts, regardless of which covariates were included in the models. In models adjusting for demographics, depression, co-morbidities, and health behaviors, optimism was not associated with mean relative telomere length (HRS: beta=-0.002; 95% CI:-0.014, 0.011; WHI: beta=-0.004; 95% CI:-0.017, 0.009).CONCLUSIONS: Findings do not support mean telomere length as a mechanism that explains observed relations of optimism with reduced risk of chronic disease in older adults. Future research is needed to evaluate other potential biological markers and pathways.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000764

    View details for PubMedID 31688458

  • Adherence to American Cancer Society and American Institute of Cancer Research dietary guidelines in overweight African American breast cancer survivors. Journal of cancer survivorship : research and practice Springfield, S., Odoms-Young, A., Tussing-Humphreys, L., Freels, S., Stolley, M. 2019

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: The American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) each created dietary and physical activity guidelines to improve cancer survivorship. Despite African American breast cancer survivors (AABCS) having the lowest survival rates of any racial or ethnic group, limited information exists on their adherence to cancer-specific lifestyle recommendations. The study's purpose was to measure adherence to ACS/AICR dietary recommendations in AABCS.METHODS: Two hundred ten AABCS enrolled in the Moving Forward intervention trial, a randomized, community-based, 6-month weight loss study, were assessed for socio-demographics, dietary intake (via food frequency questionnaire), and related health factors at baseline. We operationalized the dietary recommendations put forth by ACS/AICR and created component and total adherence index scores. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate the proportion of women who met recommendations. Student's t test and chi2 tests were used to compare participant characteristics by median adherence scores.RESULTS: The mean total ACS/AICR score was 12.7±2.5 out of 21 points (median, 13; range, 5 to 21). Over 90% were moderately or completely adherent to limiting alcohol and red & processed meat consumption, but the majority failed to meet the other recommendations to eat whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and avoid added sugars. Women with total scores below the median were younger, with higher BMI, had fewer years of education, and lower income levels.IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: The present study extends the literature on AABCS adherence to cancer survivor-specific dietary guidelines. Findings will inform future dietary lifestyle interventions in this population.

    View details for PubMedID 30982113

  • Adherence to American Cancer Society and American Institute of Cancer Research dietary guidelines in overweight African American breast cancer survivors JOURNAL OF CANCER SURVIVORSHIP Springfield, S., Odoms-Young, A., Tussing-Humphreys, L., Freels, S., Stolley, M. 2019; 13 (2): 257–68
  • A Step toward Understanding Diet Quality in Urban African-American Breast Cancer Survivors: A Cross-sectional Analysis of Baseline Data from the Moving Forward Study. Nutrition and cancer Springfield, S., Odoms-Young, A., Tussing-Humphreys, L. M., Freels, S., Stolley, M. R. 2019: 1–16

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: Little is known about the dietary behaviors of African-American breast cancer survivors (AABCS). We sought to describe dietary intake and quality in AABCS and examine associations with demographic, social, lifestyle, and body composition factors to potentially inform the development of effective dietary interventions.METHODS: Baseline data from a prospective weight loss trial of 210 AABCS were assessed. A food frequency questionnaire was used to evaluate dietary intake and diet quality via the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) and Alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI-2010). Linear regression analysis was conducted to determine the most influential variables on diet quality.RESULTS: Mean HEI- and AHEI-2010 total scores were 65.11 and 56.83 indicating that diet quality needs improvement. Women were the least adherent to recommendations for intake of whole grains, dairy, sodium, empty calories, sugary beverages, red/processed meats, and trans-fat. Increased self-efficacy for healthy eating behaviors, more years of education (AHEI only), negative smoking status, smaller waist circumference, and increased physical activity (HEI only) were significantly associated with higher diet quality scores.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest the diet quality of AABCS needs improvement. Intervention programs may achieve higher diet quality in AABCS by focusing on increasing self-efficacy for healthy eating behaviors.

    View details for PubMedID 30775929

  • A Step toward Understanding Diet Quality in Urban African-American Breast Cancer Survivors: A Cross-sectional Analysis of Baseline Data from the Moving Forward Study NUTRITION AND CANCER-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL Springfield, S., Odoms-Young, A., Tussing-Humphreys, L. M., Freels, S., Stolley, M. R. 2019; 71 (1): 61–76
  • Psychological Resilience and CVD-related Health Behaviors: a Cross-sectional Analysis of the Women's Health Initiative Extension Study Springfield, S. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019
  • Associations between fiber intake and Body Mass Index (BMI) among African-American women participating in a randomized weight loss and maintenance trial EATING BEHAVIORS Buscemi, J., Pugach, O., Springfield, S., Jang, J., Tussing-Humphreys, L., Schiffer, L., Stolley, M. R., Fitzgibbon, M. L. 2018; 29: 48–53

    Abstract

    African-American women are at increased risk for obesity, and therefore it is important to identify dietary factors that have the potential to prevent weight gain within this population. The purpose of the current study was to examine associations between daily fiber intake and Body Mass Index (BMI) over the course of an 18-month weight loss intervention for African-American women.Anthropometric measures and the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire were administered at baseline, 6-month, and 18-month follow-up between 2008 and 2010. A mixed-effects linear regression model with random intercept and time slope was used to model associations between fiber consumption and BMI controlling for time trend.Associations between fiber consumption and BMI were significantly different over time (β̂Fiber∗Time=-0.07,p-value=0.003). There was no association between fiber intake and BMI at baseline; however, there was a significant inverse relation between fiber consumption and BMI at 6 months, and the association was even stronger at 18 months.Results from this study suggest that dietary fiber consumption may be particularly important within weight loss interventions tailored for African-American women.

    View details for PubMedID 29510372

  • EXAMINING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE AND DIET QUALITY IN BLACK WOMEN: A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF NHANES DATA 2007-2012 Springfield, S. E., Singleton, C. R. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2018: S534
  • EXAMINING DISPARITIES IN DIET QUALITY BETWEEN SNAP PARTICIPANTS AND NON-PARTICIPANTS USING OAXACA-BLINDER DECOMPOSITION Singleton, C. R., Young, S., Kessee, N., Springfield, S. E., Sen, B. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2018: S533