Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Kyushu University (2019)
  • Doctor of Medicine, Nagasaki University (2009)

All Publications


  • Modulation of the Inflammatory Response and Bone Healing FRONTIERS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY Maruyama, M., Rhee, C., Utsunomiya, T., Zhang, N., Ueno, M., Yao, Z., Goodman, S. B. 2020; 11
  • Modulation of the Inflammatory Response and Bone Healing. Frontiers in endocrinology Maruyama, M., Rhee, C., Utsunomiya, T., Zhang, N., Ueno, M., Yao, Z., Goodman, S. B. 2020; 11: 386

    Abstract

    The optimal treatment for complex fractures and large bone defects is an important unsolved issue in orthopedics and related specialties. Approximately 5-10% of fractures fail to heal and develop non-unions. Bone healing can be characterized by three partially overlapping phases: the inflammatory phase, the repair phase, and the remodeling phase. Eventual healing is highly dependent on the initial inflammatory phase, which is affected by both the local and systemic responses to the injurious stimulus. Furthermore, immune cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) participate in critical inter-cellular communication or crosstalk to modulate bone healing. Deficiencies in this inter-cellular exchange, inhibition of the natural processes of acute inflammation, and its resolution, or chronic inflammation due to a persistent adverse stimulus can lead to impaired fracture healing. Thus, an initial and optimal transient stage of acute inflammation is one of the key factors for successful, robust bone healing. Recent studies demonstrated the therapeutic potential of immunomodulation for bone healing by the preconditioning of MSCs to empower their immunosuppressive properties. Preconditioned MSCs (also known as "primed/ licensed/ activated" MSCs) are cultured first with pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα and IL17A) or exposed to hypoxic conditions to mimic the inflammatory environment prior to their intended application. Another approach of immunomodulation for bone healing is the resolution of inflammation with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL4, IL10, and IL13. In this review, we summarize the principles of inflammation and bone healing and provide an update on cellular interactions and immunomodulation for optimal bone healing.

    View details for DOI 10.3389/fendo.2020.00386

    View details for PubMedID 32655495

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC7325942

  • IL-4 Overexpressing Mesenchymal Stem Cells within Gelatin-Based Microribbon Hydrogels Enhance Bone Healing in a Murine Long Bone Critical-size Defect Model. Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A Ueno, M., Lo, C. W., Barati, D., Conrad, B., Lin, T., Kohno, Y., Utsunomiya, T., Zhang, N., Maruyama, M., Rhee, C., Huang, E., Romero-Lopez, M., Tong, X., Yao, Z., Zwingenberger, S., Yang, F., Goodman, S. B. 2020

    Abstract

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising strategy for bone repair. Furthermore, the innate immune system, and specifically macrophages, play a crucial role in the differentiation and activation of MSCs. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 converts pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages into a tissue regenerative M2 phenotype, which enhances MSC differentiation and function. We developed lentivirus-transduced IL-4 over-expressing MSCs (IL-4 MSCs) that continuously produce IL-4 and polarize macrophages toward an M2 phenotype. In the current study, we investigated the potential of IL-4 MSCs delivered using a macroporous gelatin-based microribbon (μRB) scaffold for healing of critical size long bone defects in Mice. IL-4 MSCs within μRBs enhanced M2 marker expression without inhibiting M1 marker expression in the early phase, and increased macrophage migration into the scaffold. Six weeks after establishing the bone defect, IL-4 MSCs within μRBs enhanced bone formation and helped bridge the long bone defect. IL-4 MSCs delivered using macroporous μRB scaffold is potentially a valuable strategy for the treatment of critical size long bone defects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jbm.a.36982

    View details for PubMedID 32363683