Bio


I am a dual MD-MS student at Stanford University enrolled at the School of Medicine and Emmett Interdisciplinary Program for the Environment and Resources. I believe that interdisciplinary approaches are required to tackle the greatest challenges in society today, especially achieving universal healthcare access globally and mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Thus, my work focuses on the intersection of humans and the environment, whether at the molecular level studying the microenvironments of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Majeti Lab) or on a macro-scale studying how environmental decisions and values shape both human and ecological health. Ultimately, I'd like to work at reforming healthcare systems to utilize environmentally sound decisions to achieve universal healthcare access.

Honors & Awards


  • Hematology Opportunities for the Next Generation of Research Scientists (HONORS), American Society of Hematology (June 2014-August 2014)

Education & Certifications


  • Post-Bac Pre Med, Bryn Mawr College, Post baccalaureate premedical program (2011)
  • Bachelor of Arts, Carleton College, Environment & Technology Study (2008)

Clerkships


  • 2017 Spring - PSYC 300A Psychiatry Core Clerkship
  • 2017 Winter - ANES 306A Critical Care Core Clerkship
  • 2017 Winter - SURG 316A Pediatric Surgery Clerkship
  • 2016 Autumn - EMED 313A Emergency Medicine Clerkship
  • 2016 Spring - NENS 301A Neurology Core Clerkship
  • 2016 Spring - SURG 333A Multi-Organ Transplantation Clerkship
  • 2016 Spring - SURG 300A Surgery Core Clerkship
  • 2016 Summer - MED 339B Advanced Medicine Clerkship
  • 2016 Summer - PEDS 336E Subinternship in Community Hospital Pediatrics
  • 2016 Winter - PEDS 300A Pediatrics Core Clerkship
  • 2016 Winter - SURG 300A Surgery Core Clerkship
  • 2015 Autumn - MED 300A Internal Medicine Core Clerkship
  • 2015 Autumn - RAD 301A Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Clerkship
  • 2015 Summer - OBGYN 300A Obstetrics and Gynecology Core Clerkship

Research Projects


  • Development of Cold Chain Independent Probiotics As Dietary Adjuvants for Malnourished Children in Dhaka, Bangladesh (MedScholars Project)
  • Exploration of role of the Bone Marrow Niche in the proliferation and resilience of Acute Myleoid Leukemia (MedScholars Project)

Lab Affiliations


All Publications


  • New drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis: hope and reality INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG DISEASE Grosset, J. H., Singer, T. G., Bishai, W. R. 2012; 16 (8): 1005-1014

    Abstract

    The objective of this review is to report evidence about the efficacy and potential of currently licensed drugs and new molecules beyond pre-clinical development for improving the chemotherapy of tuberculosis (TB). Rifapentine, a rifamycin with low minimum inhibitory concentration, long half-life and potent sterilizing activity in mice did not confirm its potential in a recent short-term clinical trial and is being extensively re-evaluated. Moxifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, improved the activity of the standard drug regimen when substituted for ethambutol (EMB). It is being studied to shorten the duration of treatment for fully drug-susceptible TB (Remox study). Clofazimine, a fat-soluble dye with experimental activity against TB, but used only for leprosy in the last 50 years, requires further study because it has been included in a successful short 9-month combined drug regimen for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB. The diarylquinoline TMC207 is the most promising among the new TB drugs because of its experimental and clinical rate of culture conversion. Also exciting, 200 mg daily doses in humans of the nitroimidazo-oxazine PA-824 and the nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazole OPC-67683 were safe and induced a bactericidal effect of respectively 0.098 ± 0.072 log(10) and 0.040 ± 0.056 log(10) per day. The new oxazolidinones PNU-100480 and AZD-5847 might be at least as active as linezolid and much less toxic. SQ109 is an EMB analogue that does not have cross-resistance with EMB and might have synergistic activity in combined regimens. Benzothiazinones and dinitrobenzamides show exciting in vitro anti-microbial activity and deserve careful attention.

    View details for DOI 10.5588/ijtld.12.0277

    View details for Web of Science ID 000306678800004

    View details for PubMedID 22762423