Honors & Awards


  • Eben J. Carey, MD Award, Phi Chi Medical Fraternity (2008-2009)
  • Michael J. Carey, MD Award, Phi Chi Medical Fraternity (2010-2011)
  • Patrick H. Hanley Medical Scholarship, Tulane University (2009-2012)
  • Jack Aron Medical Scholarship, Tulane University (2009-2012)
  • Schwartz-Stuckey Award, Tulane University (2008-2012)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Stanford University Healthcare Surgery Representative, Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Medical Honor Society (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Stanford Society of Physician Scholars (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Alpha Eta Mu Beta Biomedical Engineering Honor Society (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Kappa Delta Phi Honor Fraternity (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Science and Engineering Honor Society (2012 - Present)

Professional Education


  • MD, Tulane University School of Medicine, Medicine (2012)
  • BSE, Tulane University, Biomedical Engineering (2008)

Community and International Work


  • Parirenyatwa Hospital, Zimbabwe

    Topic

    Global surgery

    Partnering Organization(s)

    University of Zimbabwe

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Young Women in Bio (YWIB)

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Women in Bio (WIB)

    Populations Served

    Young women

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Patents


  • William Christopher Kethman, Bronwyn Uber Harris, Frank Tinghwa Wang, Todd Edward Murphy. "United States Patent US20160224750A1 Monitoring system for assessing control of a disease state", Leland Stanford Junior University
  • David Rice, William Kethman, Bryan Molter, Stephanie Roberts, Mark Young. "United States Patent US8496668B2 Combined umbilical cord cutter, clamp, and disinfectant", Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund
  • Steve Allen Franseen, William Kethman, Dann Schwartz. "United States Patent WO2016081822A1 Multi-component detachable cutting and clamping tool and methods of using same", Novate Medical Technologies

All Publications


  • Advanced minimal access surgery in infants weighing less than 3kg: A single center experience. Journal of pediatric surgery Wall, J. K., Sinclair, T. J., Kethman, W., Williams, C., Albanese, C., Sylvester, K. G., Bruzoni, M. 2017

    Abstract

    Minimal access surgery (MAS) has gained popularity in infants less than 5kg, however, significant challenges still arise in very low weight infants.A retrospective chart review was performed to identify all infants weighing less than 3kg who underwent an advanced MAS or equivalent open procedure from 2009 to 2016. Advanced case types included Nissen fundoplication, duodenal atresia repair, Ladd procedure, congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair, esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula repair, diaphragmatic plication, and pyloric atresia repair. A comparative analysis was performed between the MAS and open cohorts.A total of 45 advanced MAS cases and 17 open cases met the inclusion criteria. Gestational age and age at operation were similar between the cohorts, while infants who underwent open procedures had significantly lower weight at operation (p=0.003). There were no deaths within 30days related to surgery in either group. Only 3 MAS cases required unintended conversion to open. There were 2 (4.4%) postoperative complications related to surgery in the MAS cohort and 2 (11.8%) in the open cohort.Advanced MAS may be performed in infants weighing less than 3kg with low mortality, acceptable rates of conversion, and similar rates of complications as open procedures.Prognosis study.Level III.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2017.05.006

    View details for PubMedID 28549685

  • Say What? Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba Syndrome Presenting with Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to Hamartoma-Induced Intussusception. Digestive diseases and sciences Kethman, W., Rao, A., Devereaux, K., Ouellet, E., Kin, C. 2017

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-016-4443-4

    View details for PubMedID 28168574

  • Thyroid Hormone Replacement Therapy, Surveillance Ultrasonography, and Fine-Needle Aspiration After Hemithyroidectomy ANNALS OF OTOLOGY RHINOLOGY AND LARYNGOLOGY Noureldine, S. I., Khan, A., Massasati, S. A., Kethman, W., Kandil, E. 2013; 122 (7): 450-456

    Abstract

    We undertook a retrospective analysis of a single surgeon's experience at a tertiary care teaching hospital to determine the rates of surveillance ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration (FNA), and the need for thyroid hormone replacement therapy (THRT) after hemithyroidectomy.The study population comprised 120 consecutive patients who underwent hemithyroidectomy by one surgeon from January 2008 to June 2011. The medical records were reviewed for preoperative and postoperative calcium levels, fiberoptic direct laryngoscopy examination of vocal fold mobility, postoperative complications, final pathology, and postoperative follow-up.Fifteen patients required completion thyroidectomy for malignancy and were excluded from the surveillance analysis. Of the remaining 105 patients, 10 (9.5%) required postoperative THRT. The likelihood for THRT was significantly associated with increased age (p = 0.01) and the presence of thyroiditis (p = 0.04). Other factors, such as gender, body mass index, residual thyroid volume, and presence of contralateral lobe nodules, were not significantly associated with this likelihood (p > 0.05). Twenty-three patients (21.9%) were followed with surveillance ultrasound, of whom 12 (11.4%) underwent FNA for nodule(s) in the contralateral lobe. Seventy-eight percent of patients did not require any long-term postoperative surveillance. There were no instances of permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve injury or hypoparathyroidism.Hemithyroidectomy is an effective and efficient option for the management of benign and suspicious thyroid nodules. However, patients of increased age and/or with thyroiditis are at higher risk for postoperative hypothyroidism, and should be counseled to consider total thyroidectomy to avoid the need for long-term surveillance and the possible need for a second operation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000321880700007

    View details for PubMedID 23951697