Bio


Dr. Albert Y. Wu is a board-certified ophthalmologist and a fellow of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons (ASOPRS) and the American College of Surgeons (FACS). Dr. Wu graduated from Yale University and completed his medical training at the University of Washington. As part of the Medical Scientist Training Program, he also obtained a Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biology. Dr. Wu then completed ophthalmology residency at the Moran Eye Center in Salt Lake City. Subsequently, he finished a two-year fellowship at the University of Toronto in oculofacial and orbital surgery accredited by ASOPRS. During this time, Dr. Wu developed broad expertise in ophthalmic plastic surgery as well as in facial rejuvenation techniques. Dr. Wu joined the faculty of the Department of Ophthalmology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and was a member of the Black Family Stem Cell Institute. While in New York City, he obtained funding from the National Eye Institute to develop stem cell therapies to treat corneal blindness and regenerate the ocular surface. Currently as Director of Oculoplastics Research, Dr. Wu leads the Ophthalmic Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Laboratory at Stanford University and is developing cutting edge treatments for vision loss and eye disease.

At the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford, Dr. Wu sees adults and children with eye, eyelid, lacrimal, and orbital disorders, as well as patients desiring aesthetic treatments of the face. He has extensive clinical and surgical experience in the following:
- Blepharoplasty
- Hemifacial Spasm and Blepharospasm
- Dry Eye Syndrome
- Enucleation and Management of Anophthalmic Socket
- Eyelid and Orbital Reconstructive Surgery
- Eyelid Malpositions (Ptosis, Ectropion, Entropion, Lid Reaction)
- Facial Palsy (Bells Palsy)
- Lacrimal Diseases and Surgery
- Eyelid & Orbital Tumors
- Oculofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
- Orbital and Facial Fractures
- Orbital Decompression Surgery
- Orbital Inflammatory Disease
- Pediatric Oculoplastics
- Thyroid Eye Disease

Clinical Focus


  • Ophthalmology
  • Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
  • Ocular Surface Reconstruction

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director of Oculoplastics Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford School of Medicine (2017 - Present)
  • Division Head, Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (2016 - 2017)
  • Director of Oculoplastics Trauma, Mount Sinai Medical Center (2016 - 2017)
  • Director of Medical Student Education, Department of Ophthalmology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (2012 - 2017)

Honors & Awards


  • Dr. Solomon Silver Award in Clinical Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (2016)
  • Excellence in Teaching Award, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (2015)
  • Faculty Council Award for Academic Excellence, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (2015)
  • Honorary Member, Romanian Association of Plastic Surgery (2015)
  • Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (2013)
  • ASOPRS Fellowship, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (2009)
  • Young Investigator Award, 1st International Conference on cGMP (2003)
  • Biology of Aging Fellowship, National Institute of Health (1998)
  • Parrett Scholarship, University of Washington (1998)
  • Poncin Award, University of Washington (1998)
  • Medical Scientist Training Program, National Institute of Health (1995)
  • Richter Fellowship, Yale University (1994)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Fellow, American College of Surgeons (2016 - Present)
  • Scientific Review Committee, Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology Congress (2016 - 2016)
  • Information Technology Committee, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (2015 - Present)
  • Scientific Review Committee, Fight for Sight (2015 - Present)
  • Education Committee, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (2014 - Present)
  • Advocacy and Public Outreach Committee, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (2013 - Present)
  • Fellow, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (2013 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Ophthalmology, American Board of Ophthalmology (2013)
  • Fellowship:Toronto University Ocuplastic and Orbital Surgery Fellowship (2011) Canada
  • Residency:University of Utah Opthalmology Residency (2009) UT
  • Internship:University of Utah Internal Medicine Residency (2006) UT
  • Medical Education:University of Washington School of Medicine (2005) WA
  • Board Certification, American Board of Ophthalmology
  • Fellowship, University of Toronto, Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
  • Residency, Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Ophthalmology
  • Internship, University of Utah, Preliminary Medicine
  • MD, University of Washington, Medicine
  • PhD, University of Washington, Molecular and Cellular Biology
  • BS, Yale University, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

Community and International Work


  • Virtue Foundation Humanitarian Surgical Mission, Khovd, Mongolia

    Topic

    Surgical mission for patients in need

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Virtue Foundation

    Populations Served

    Mongolia

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Ophthalmology Outreach in Tanzania, Morogoro, Tanzania

    Topic

    Ophthalmology

    Populations Served

    Tanzania

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


My goal is to perform translational research, bringing breakthroughs in stem cell biology and tissue engineering to clinical ophthalmology and reconstructive surgery. Over 6 million people worldwide are afflicted with corneal blindness, usually caused by chemical and thermal burns, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, microbial infections, or chronic inflammation. These injuries often result in corneal vascularization, conjunctivalization, scarring, and opacification from limbal epithelial stem cell (LSC) deficiency (LSCD), for which there is currently no durable treatment. Bilateral LSCD is particular devastating not only because of lost quality of life and social productivity, but because unlike most retinal diseases that affect the aged, LSCD largely affects the relatively young. The most promising cure for bilateral LSCD is finding an autologous source of limbal epithelial cells for transplantation. Utilizing recent advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), my research aims to create a reliable and renewable source of limbal epithelial cells for potential use in treating human eye diseases. These cells will be grown on resorbable biomatrices to generate stable transplantable corneal tissue. These studies will serve as the basis for human clinical trials and make regenerative medicine a reality for those with sight-threatening disease. On a broader level, this experimental approach could serve as a paradigm for the creation of other transplantable tissue for use throughout the body. Stem cell biology has the potential to influence every field of medicine and will revolutionize the way we perform surgery.

All Publications


  • Conservative therapy for chalazia: is it really effective? Acta ophthalmologica Wu, A. Y., Gervasio, K. A., Gergoudis, K. N., Wei, C., Oestreicher, J. H., Harvey, J. T. 2018

    Abstract

    To assess the within-treatment efficacy of hot compresses (HC), HC plus tobramycin (Tobrex) and HC plus tobramycin/dexamethasone (Tobradex) for chalazia treatment.Design: Multicentre, randomized clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01230593).Two clinical sites in New York and two clinical sites in Ontario.A total of 149 patients with one or more chalazia on separate eyelids randomly assigned to receive HC (n = 50), HC plus tobramycin (n = 50) or HC plus tobramycin/dexamethasone (n = 49).4-6 weeks of assigned treatment. Patients were measured for chalazion horizontal width and surveyed for pain and treatment satisfaction levels.Primary outcome was complete resolution (100% size reduction). Secondary outcomes were size change in millimetres and patient reported pre- and post-treatment pain and satisfaction levels.In the intention-to-treat (ITT) population, complete resolution occurred in 36 (18%) lesions total, 13 (21%) treated with HC, 12 (16%) with HC plus tobramycin and 11 (18%) with HC plus tobramycin/dexamethasone, with no significant difference between them (p = .78). Individually by paired t-test, there were statistically significant post-treatment mean size differences: HC 1.20 mm (p < 0.001), HC plus tobramycin 1.69 mm (p < .001) and HC plus tobramycin/dexamethasone 1.54 mm (p < 0.001), but no significant difference between them (p = .61). Lesions that completely resolved had a statistically significant lower pretreatment duration (1.5 months) compared to lesions that did not completely resolve (2.2 months) (p = .04).Hot compresses (HC) alone or in combination with tobramycin or tobramycin/dexamethasone drops and ointment are all effective first-line treatment options for chalazia. However, physicians may consider moving directly to the use of more invasive therapies, such as incision and curettage or steroid injections, for chalazia that have been present for more than 2 months, as older lesions are less likely to resolve with conservative therapies alone.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/aos.13675

    View details for PubMedID 29338124

  • Gun trauma and ophthalmic outcomes. Eye (London, England) Chopra, N., Gervasio, K. A., Kalosza, B., Wu, A. Y. 2017

    Abstract

    PurposeThis retrospective cohort study assesses the visual outcomes of patients who survive gunshot wounds to the head.MethodsThe Elmhurst City Hospital Trauma Registry and Mount Sinai Data Warehouse were queried for gun trauma resulting in ocular injury over a 16-year period. Thirty-one patients over 16 years of age were found who suffered a gunshot wound to the head and resultant ocular trauma: orbital fracture, ruptured globe, foreign body, or optic nerve injury. Gun types included all firearms and air guns. Nine patients were excluded due to incorrect coding or unavailable charts. Statistical analysis was performed using a simple bivariate analysis (χ2).ResultsOf the 915 victims of gun trauma to the head, 27 (3.0%) sustained ocular injuries. Of the 22 patients whose records were accessible, 18 survived. Eight of the 18 surviving patients (44%) suffered long-term visual damage, defined as permanent loss of vision in at least one eye to the level of counting fingers or worse. Neither location of injury (P=0.243), nor type of gun used (P=0.296), nor cause of gun trauma (P=0.348) predicted visual loss outcome. The Glasgow Coma Scale eye response score on arrival to the hospital also did not predict visual loss outcome (P=0.793).ConclusionThere has been a dearth of research into gun trauma and even less research on the visual outcomes following gun trauma. Our study finds that survivors of gun trauma to the head suffer long-term visual damage 44% of the time after injury.Eye advance online publication, 22 December 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.249.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/eye.2017.249

    View details for PubMedID 29271420

  • Novel Hormone Receptors Present in Apocrine Cystadenoma of the Eyelid OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Brown, S. E., Friedman, A. H., Phelps, R. G., Bleiweiss, I. J., Wu, A. Y. 2017; 33 (1): E20-E21

    Abstract

    A 53-year-old woman presented with an apocrine cystadenoma of the right upper eyelid. Histologic examination revealed proliferating epithelial cells with apocrine snouts and occasional mitotic figures. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a Ki-67 index of 15% and positive staining for synaptophysin, chromogranin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, gross cystic disease fluid protein (GCDFP)-15, and mammoglobin. The complement of positive immunomarkers in this case reinforces the importance of total excision and careful histologic assessment.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/IOP.0000000000000416

    View details for Web of Science ID 000392250400028

    View details for PubMedID 25719370

  • Applications of stem cell biology to oculoplastic surgery CURRENT OPINION IN OPHTHALMOLOGY Daniel, M. G., Wu, A. Y. 2016; 27 (5): 428-432

    Abstract

    The review examines the utility of stem cell biology in ophthalmology and oculoplastic surgery.The applicability of stem cell biology varies across a range of different subfields within ophthalmology and oculoplastic surgery. Resident stem cells have been identified in the lacrimal gland, corneal limbus, orbital fat, and muscles of the eye, and can potentially be applied for in-vitro cell and organ cultures with the intent of disease modeling and transplants. The discovery of adipocyte-derived stem cells offered a potentially powerful tool for a variety of oculoplastic applications, such as wound healing, skin rejuvenation, and burn therapeutics. Several groups are currently identifying new uses for stem cells in oculoplastic surgery.The need for stem cell treatment spans a wide array of subfields within ophthalmology, ranging from reconstruction of the eyelid to the generation of artificial lacrimal glands and oncological therapeutics. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells opened the realm of regenerative medicine, making the modeling of patient-specific diseases a possibility. The identification and characterization of endogenous stem cell populations in the eye makes it possible to obtain specific tissues through induced pluripotent stem cells differentiation, permitting their use in transplants for oculoplastic surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/ICU.0000000000000288

    View details for Web of Science ID 000382560300011

    View details for PubMedID 27206262

  • Awareness and Knowledge of Emergent Ophthalmic Disease Among Patients in an Internal Medicine Clinic JAMA OPHTHALMOLOGY Uhr, J. H., Mishra, K., Wei, C., Wu, A. Y. 2016; 134 (4): 424-431

    Abstract

    Emergent ophthalmic disease can lead to permanent visual impairment or blindness if medical attention is delayed. Awareness and knowledge of emergent ophthalmic disease may be important for early medical presentation and maximization of visual prognosis in some cases.To assess public awareness and knowledge of 4 emergent ophthalmic diseases.This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 1 to July 30, 2015, in the waiting rooms of the outpatient internal medicine resident clinic at Mount Sinai Hospital. A written survey was administered to evaluate awareness and knowledge of retinal detachment, acute angle-closure glaucoma, giant cell arteritis, and central retinal artery occlusion. Awareness of each disease was assessed by whether participants knew what the diseases were (yes or no). Knowledge was evaluated by responses to 3 questions for each disease, including 1 question about basic pathophysiologic features, 1 question about basic symptoms, and 1 question about basic treatment options. All English-speaking patients who were physically and cognitively able to fill out the survey without assistance were considered eligible and offered the opportunity to participate during times of survey distribution; 237 completed the survey. Demographic information, including age, sex, race, income, and educational level, was collected. Data were assessed from August 1 to 7, 2015.Awareness of each ophthalmic disease was determined by the proportion of respondents who answered yes, and knowledge was determined by the proportion of aware respondents who answered the knowledge questions correctly.Two hundred thirty-seven patients (of 227 who gave complete demographic information, 76 men [33.5%], 151 women [66.5%], and mean [SD] age, 51.3 [16.8] years) completed the survey. Awareness of each of the diseases studied was low; 61 of 220 respondents (27.7%; 95% CI, 21.8%-33.6%) were aware of retinal detachment; 32 of 219 respondents (14.6%; 95% CI, 9.9%-19.3%), acute angle-closure glaucoma; 11 of 216 respondents (5.1%; 95% CI, 2.2%-8.0%), giant cell arteritis; and 10 of 218 respondents (4.6%; 95% CI, 1.8%-7.4%), central retinal artery occlusion. Respondents who were aware and knowledgeable ranged from 29 of 199 (14.6%) for the pathophysiologic features of retinal detachment, 1 of 208 (0.5%) for the symptoms and 2 of 203 (1.0%) for treatment of giant cell arteritis, and 1 of 193 (0.5%) for the pathophysiologic features of central retinal artery occlusion.Levels of awareness and knowledge of emergent ophthalmic diseases are low. These results indicate a need to educate the public about these acutely vision-threatening entities to ensure early medical presentation, to achieve the best possible visual prognosis, and to preserve quality of life.

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2015.6212

    View details for Web of Science ID 000373988900019

    View details for PubMedID 26892039

  • Corneal recovery in a rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency model by autologous grafts of tertiary outgrowths from cultivated limbal biopsy explants MOLECULAR VISION Selver, O. B., Durak, I., Gurdal, M., Baysal, K., Ates, H., Ozbek, Z., Wang, Z., Wu, A., Wolosin, J. M. 2016; 22: 138-149

    Abstract

    To determine the corneal regenerative capacity of sequentially generated primary, secondary, and tertiary limbal explant outgrowths in a limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) surgical model.Two-millimeter-long limbal shallow biopsies were surgically excised from the upper quadrant of the right eye of rabbits and set on preserved amniotic membrane for explant culture. After the generation of primary outgrowth, the biopsies were sequentially transferred to new amniotic membrane to generate secondary and then tertiary outgrowths. Eighteen rabbits were subjected to a 360° limbal peritomy extending into the scleral zone and combined with superficial keratectomy of the corneal periphery and thorough mechanical debridement of the central cornea in their left eye. Right eye outgrowths, six of each generation, were engrafted on the ocular surface. Clinical outcomes (neovascularization, corneal clarity, and corneal fluorescein staining) were graded after 6 months. Post-mortem corneas were compared with histology, immunochemistry for p63 and Krt3, ABCG2-dependent dye exclusion, and capacity for outgrowths in explant culture.Immunohistology and western blot of the outgrowths for p63 and Krt3 indicated no differences in expression between the primary and tertiary outgrowths for these two markers of growth and differentiation. Clinically, all rabbits treated with amniotic membrane alone developed severe LSCD. Most rabbits grafted with cell outgrowths from all three outgrowth generations achieved stable (>6 months) recovery of the ocular surface. There were partial failures of grafts performed with two secondary and tertiary outgrowths. However, Kruskal-Wallis statistical analysis of the clinical scores yielded no significant difference between the three groups (p=0.524). Histology showed full anatomic recovery of grafts made with primary and tertiary outgrowths. Krt3 and p63 expression throughout the whole limbal corneal epithelium with primary or tertiary outgrowths was not distinguishable from each other. The percentage of dye-excluding cells present within this zone and the capacity of the explant epithelial outgrowth of the regenerated peripheral corneal zone were also on par with those of the donor corneas. The Krt3-negative cells that characterize the basal epithelial layer of the normal limbus could not be found in any regenerated cornea from the primary to tertiary outgrowths.Our results demonstrate that in rabbits post-primary explant outgrowths retain the capacity for LSCD recovery found in primary explants.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000369699800001

    View details for PubMedID 26937166

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4757454

  • Prognostic Value of Ocular Trauma Scores in Patients With Combined Open Globe Injuries and Facial Fractures AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY Gervasio, K. A., Weinstock, B. M., Wu, A. Y. 2015; 160 (5): 882-888

    Abstract

    To assess the prognostic value of the Ocular Trauma Score in patients with combined open globe injuries and facial fractures.Retrospective cohort study.A comprehensive chart review was conducted on 25 patients (28 eyes) identified from the Elmhurst City Hospital Trauma Registry between January 1, 2000 and June 30, 2012. Elmhurst City Hospital is a level 1 trauma center located in Elmhurst, New York, USA.Average age was 52 (range 18-88) and patients were predominantly male (84%). The majority of patients had an Ocular Trauma Score of 1 (87.5%), and of these patients, 76% and 14% had final visual acuities of no light perception (NLP) and light perception/hand motion (LP/HM), respectively. These corresponded to 74% and 15% predicted by the original Ocular Trauma Score guidelines (100% sensitive and 100% specific). Ocular Trauma Score of 1 was associated with zone 3 eye wound location (P = .02). Independent of Ocular Trauma Score, initial visual acuity and frontal bone fractures were predictive of NLP (P = .006 and P = .047). Nonblindness was associated with nasal bone fractures (P = .047).This study validates the use of the Ocular Trauma Score in patients with combined facial fracture and open globe injury. The presence of facial fractures does not appear to influence visual prognosis for open globe injuries with an Ocular Trauma Score of 1. In the absence of data to calculate a full Ocular Trauma Score, initial visual acuity was the strongest predictor of final visual outcome.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ajo.2015.08.007

    View details for Web of Science ID 000363914800006

    View details for PubMedID 26275473

  • Diagnostic Delay and Amniotic Membrane Transplantation in a Child With Atypical Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Journal of pediatric ophthalmology & strabismus Gervasio, K. A., Wu, A. Y. 2015; 52 Online: e41-4

    Abstract

    A 4-year-old boy presented with a 6-day history of severe non-limbic-sparing conjunctivitis. Atypical Stevens-Johnson syndrome with a possible cause of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was suspected as the precipitant of the clinical symptoms. The patient recovered with amniotic membrane transplantation and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy despite an initial delay in diagnosis.

    View details for DOI 10.3928/01913913-20150811-01

    View details for PubMedID 26301401

  • Bilateral Lacrimal Gland Disease Clinical Features of 97 Cases OPHTHALMOLOGY Tang, S. X., Lim, R. P., Al-Dahmash, S., Blaydon, S. M., Cho, R. I., Choe, C. H., Connor, M. A., Durairaj, V. D., Eckstein, L. A., Hayek, B., Langer, P. D., Lelli, G. J., Mancini, R., Rabinovich, A., Servat, J., Shore, J. W., Sokol, J. A., Tsirbas, A., Wladis, E. J., Wu, A. Y., Shields, J. A., Shields, C., Shinder, R. 2014; 121 (10): 2040-?

    Abstract

    Bilateral lacrimal gland (LG) disease is a unique presentation that can result from varied causes. We reviewed the diagnoses, clinical features, and outcomes of 97 patients with this entity.Case series.Ninety-seven patients with bilateral LG disease.Retrospective review and statistical analysis using analysis of variance and the Fisher exact test.Patient demographics, clinical features, diagnostic testing, diagnosis, and treatment.Patient age ranging from 8 to 84 years (mean, 46 years). The predominant gender was female (77%), and race included black (49%), white (38%), and Hispanic (12%) patients. Diagnoses fell into 4 categories: inflammatory (n = 51; 53%), structural (n = 20; 21%), lymphoproliferative (n = 19; 20%), and uncommon (n = 7; 7%) entities. The most common diagnoses included idiopathic orbital inflammation (IOI; n = 29; 30%), sarcoidosis (n = 19; 20%), prolapsed LG (n = 15; 15%), lymphoma (n = 11; 11%), lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 8; 8%), and dacryops (n = 5; 5%). Inflammatory conditions were more likely in younger patients (P<0.05) and in those with pain (P<0.001) and mechanical blepharoptosis (P<0.01) at presentation, whereas lymphoma was more common in older patients (P<0.001) without active signs of inflammation at presentation. Black patients were more likely to have sarcoidosis (P<0.01). Laboratory results showed high angiotensin converting enzyme level being significantly more likely in patients with sarcoidosis (P<0.05). However, sensitivity was limited to 45%, with 25% of patients diagnosed with IOI also demonstrating positive results. Corticosteroid therapy was the treatment of choice in 38 cases, corresponding to resolution of symptoms in 29% and improvement in an additional 32%. Overall, chronic underlying disease was found in 71% of patients, among whom 26% achieved a disease-free state, whereas 3% succumbed to their underlying disease.The cause of bilateral lacrimal gland disease most commonly was inflammatory, followed by structural and lymphoproliferative. Patient characteristics and clinical presentations were key features distinguishing between competing possibilities. Despite local control with corticosteroids or radiotherapy, underlying disease continued in 71% of patients and led to death in 3%.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ophtha.2014.04.018

    View details for Web of Science ID 000342697300036

    View details for PubMedID 24907059

  • Enucleation versus evisceration in ocular trauma: a retrospective review and study of current literature. Orbit (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Zheng, C., Wu, A. Y. 2013; 32 (6): 356-361

    Abstract

    To compare variables and outcomes from ocular trauma leading to either enucleation or evisceration to better inform surgical decision making.Retrospective chart review.We reviewed 441 patients between 2001 and 2012 presenting with ocular trauma to a Level 1 trauma center in Queens, New York; of these, there were 16 enucleations and 6 eviscerations. Retrospective chart review noted age, gender, mechanism of injury, initial and final visual acuity, time to surgery, length of follow-up, pain, degree of motility, and complications. A review of literature in the context of our study was performed.20 patients were male and 2 patients were female; average age was 44 (SD: 20.0, range 18-91). 9/16 patients were enucleated to prevent sympathetic ophthalmia, whereas only 1/5 patient was eviscerated for this indication (p = 0.1619). No cases of sympathetic ophthalmia were reported over an average follow-up of 316 days. Average length of follow-up varied significantly between the two groups, with an average of 370.4 days (SD: 566.9, range 0-1870) for enucleated eyes and 172.7 days (SD: 146.3, range 0-422) for eviscerated eyes (p = 0.42). Medpor implants were preferred in eviscerations (5/6 eviscerations), whereas hydroxyapatite implants were preferred in enucleations (10/16 enucleations, p = 0.04).Surgical decision-making in ocular trauma is largely based on surgeon preference and experience, with minimal evidence in the literature to support either enucleation or evisceration. We recommend evisceration over enucleation in cases of reliable patient follow-up due to the low incidence of sympathetic ophthalmia.

    View details for DOI 10.3109/01676830.2013.764452

    View details for PubMedID 23909276

  • Idiopathic recurrent subconjunctival hemorrhage. Canadian journal of ophthalmology. Journal canadien d'ophtalmologie Wu, A. Y., Kugathasan, K., Harvey, J. T. 2012; 47 (5): e28-9

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcjo.2012.03.012

    View details for PubMedID 23036560

  • A case of orbital involvement in IgG4-related disease. Orbit (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Teichman, J. C., Wu, A. Y., El-Shinnawy, I., Harvey, J. T. 2012; 31 (5): 327-329

    Abstract

    A 46-year-old male was referred to the Ophthalmology Service for a 7-year history of bilateral proptosis and a presumptive diagnosis of thyroid eye disease. Past medical history was only significant for autoimmune pancreatitis. All laboratory testing including tests of thyroid function were within normal limits. The patient underwent orbital biopsy and was found to have plasma cells containing mainly IgG4 immunoglobulin that was consistent with IgG4-related disease. The patient was treated with oral prednisone and the proptosis resolved within 3 weeks.

    View details for DOI 10.3109/01676830.2011.616618

    View details for PubMedID 22712681

  • Cadaveric Anatomical Comparison of the Lateral Nasal Wall After External and Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Rootman, D., DeAngelis, D., Tucker, N., Wu, A., Hurwitz, J. 2012; 28 (2): 149-153

    Abstract

    Much literature has accumulated espousing the relative merits of endonasal and external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). However, there is comparatively little information on the relative anatomic differences between these 2 approaches. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anatomic relationships of the lateral nasal wall for endonasal and external DCR.Ten cadaver half heads were used in this study. Half were subject to endonasal and half to external DCR procedures. The lateral nasal wall was then dissected and measurements were taken of ostium and anastomosis size and position relative to other landmarks on the lateral nasal wall. Relationships were compared between the 2 procedures.The dimensions and area of the ostium and the anastomosis were similar between the 2 procedures. The lower portion of the ostium was located more inferiorly in endonasal DCR. Additionally, the ostium was more likely to be found lateral to the axilla of the middle turbinate in endonasal DCR, when compared with anterior for external. External DCR was also more likely to involve opening the anterior ethmoid air cells than endonasal approach.Endonasal and external DCR osteomies appear to be of similar size, with the endonasal opening being located slightly lower and more posterior on the lateral nasal wall.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/IOP.0b013e318248e687

    View details for Web of Science ID 000301974000025

    View details for PubMedID 22410664

  • Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis after routine colonoscopy CANADIAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY-JOURNAL CANADIEN D OPHTALMOLOGIE Wu, A. Y., Oestreicher, J. H. 2011; 46 (6): 556-557

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcio.2011.10.002

    View details for Web of Science ID 000299017600027

    View details for PubMedID 22153651

  • Bicanalicular Laceration Repair Via an Endoscopic Retrograde Approach OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Wu, A. Y., Tucker, N. A. 2011; 27 (6): E165-E167

    Abstract

    A 31-year-old man presented 5 days after a left bicanalicular laceration from trauma. Identification of the medial cut ends under direct visualization was unsuccessful. A retrograde endoscopic approach was used to identify the common canaliculus or one of the medial cut ends of the canaliculi by injecting the lacrimal sac with saline and observing fluid egress from the wound. Both canaliculi were stented with a silicone tube and both ends of the tube were passed through the identified medial opening in the lacrimal sac. The tubes were retrieved from the nose and tied, and then left for 6 months before removal. The patient did not complain of epiphora and demonstrated bicanalicular patency on irrigation. This is the first description of using an endoscopic retrograde approach to identify the medial ends of a bicanalicular laceration.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/IOP.0b013e31820c6e3f

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296865200012

    View details for PubMedID 21346667

  • Bifocal Orbital and Nasopharyngeal Amyloidomas Presenting as Graves Disease OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Wu, A. Y., Chapman, W. B., Witterick, I. J., DeAngelis, D. D. 2011; 27 (5): E132-E134

    Abstract

    A 72-year-old man presented with a slowly progressive left hyperglobus, left infraduction deficit, bilateral lower eyelid retraction, and dysphagia. He had a notable chin-down head position, diplopia in primary position, and 3 mm of left proptosis. He had been diagnosed with Graves disease 3 years before presentation. CT scans showed enlargement of the left inferior and medial rectus muscles with associated stranding of the retrobulbar fat and a low-density heterogeneous mass in the left aspect of the neck protruding in the nasopharynx. Biopsies of the orbit and nasopharynx revealed focal areas of amyloid. This represents the first report of bifocal amyloidomas of the orbit and nasopharynx.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/IOP.0b013e31820367ca

    View details for Web of Science ID 000294711700012

    View details for PubMedID 21178798

  • Indications for Orbital Imaging by the Oculoplastic Surgeon OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Wu, A. Y., Jebodhsingh, K., Le, T., Law, C., Tucker, N. A., DeAngelis, D. D., Oestreicher, J. H., Harvey, J. T. 2011; 27 (4): 260-262

    Abstract

    To determine the indications for ordering orbital imaging and the indications for ordering CT versus MRI by oculoplastic surgeons and to assess the correlation between surgeon's clinical indications for imaging and the radiologist's diagnosis.Retrospective review of imaging requisitions and radiology reports.Patients of 4 oculoplastic surgeons who required CT or MRI scans.Imaging requisitions and radiology reports of patients from 4 oculoplastic surgeons were reviewed to determine the indication for ordering a CT or MRI scan between March 2006 and March 2009. The indications were then compared with the radiologist's diagnosis.A total of 735 patients were included: 449 (61.1%) female and 286 (38.9%) male, with an average age of 50.1 years and an age range of 7 months to 93 years. Of these patients, a total of 632 CT and 223 MRI scans were ordered, 135 of which were follow-up scans.The most common indication for CT scan was thyroid disease, followed by orbital tumors and then inflammatory disease, while the most common indication for MRI scan was orbital tumors, followed by inflammatory disease and then thyroid disease. CT scans were more commonly ordered than MRI, largely for trauma and to rule out orbital foreign body.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/IOP.0b013e31820b0365

    View details for Web of Science ID 000292633700022

    View details for PubMedID 21326128

  • Enduragen patch grafts for exposed orbital implants. Orbit (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Wu, A. Y., Vagefi, M. R., Georgescu, D., Burroughs, J. R., Anderson, R. L. 2011; 30 (2): 92-95

    Abstract

    To present a new technique using the recently introduced Enduragen(®) material (Tissue Science Laboratories) as a patch graft for exposed ocular implants.A retrospective, interventional, non-comparative case series of 3 patients who had Enduragen patch grafts for the closure of Tenon's capsule and conjunctiva over exposed ocular implants. Medical records were reviewed and the following parameters were collected: age, gender, indication for surgery, type of surgery, laterality, type of orbital implant, complications after repair and length of follow-up.Three patients were identified, 2 males and 1 female. One patient had a secondary quad-motility implant with supertemporal exposure. The second patient had a secondary implant with a fistula at the lateral aspect of the socket. The third patient had a centrally exposed primary hydroxyapatite implant. All patients received Enduragen patch grafts to cover the implant. Follow up ranged from 40 to 43 months (mean, 41.3 months; SD, ± 1.5). None of the 3 patients had any signs of implant re-exposure at the time of the last post-operative visit. There were no intra-operative or early complications observed.This consecutive case series suggests that Enduragen could be used as a safe and effective patch graft for exposed ocular implants. However, a larger prospective study with longer follow-up would be useful in further defining the indications and limitations of the Enduragen patch graft for the treatment of exposed orbital implants.

    View details for DOI 10.3109/01676830.2011.558974

    View details for PubMedID 21438730

  • Eyelash Resection Procedure for Severe, Recurrent, or Segmental Cicatricial Entropion OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Wu, A. Y., Thakker, M. M., Wladis, E. J., Weinberg, D. A. 2010; 26 (2): 112-116

    Abstract

    To study the safety, efficacy, and cosmetic outcome of the eyelash resection procedure for treatment of severe, recurrent, or segmental cicatricial entropion.Retrospective consecutive case series of patients with severe, recurrent, or segmental cicatricial entropion treated with eyelash resection at the Moran Eye Center and the University of Vermont. Investigators performed chart reviews of these patients and evaluated effectiveness of the treatment and outcome data, including age, gender, diagnoses, method of repair, recurrence of trichiasis, and cosmetic satisfaction. There were no exclusionary characteristics specified in the study.A total of 26 eyelids were operated on in 5 male and 11 female patients. The mean age was 74 years, with the following diagnoses: idiopathic (6), ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (2), postoperative (2), ocular pseudopemphigoid (drug related) (1), graft-versus-host disease (1), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1), trachoma (1), linear IgA bullous dermatosis (1), and trauma (1). Mean postoperative follow-up was 13 months. The functional success rate was 90.5%, and the cosmetic success rate was 100%.The eyelash resection procedure is a safe, effective, and cosmetically acceptable procedure for treatment of severe, recurrent, or segmental cicatricial entropion.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/IOP.0b013e3181b8c900

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276129300011

    View details for PubMedID 20305511

  • Low-cost headlamps for facial and oculoplastic surgery OPHTHALMIC PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Wu, A. Y., Vagefi, M. R., Georgescu, D., McCann, J. D., Anderson, R. L. 2008; 24 (5): 429-429

    View details for Web of Science ID 000259652900028

    View details for PubMedID 18806679

  • Molecular determinants for cyclic nucleotide binding to the regulatory domains of phosphodiesterase 2A JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Wu, A. Y., Tang, X. B., Martinez, S. E., Ikeda, K., Beavo, J. A. 2004; 279 (36): 37928-37938

    Abstract

    Binding of cGMP to the GAF-B domain of phosphodiesterase 2A allosterically activates catalytic activity. We report here a series of mutagenesis studies on the GAF-B domain of PDE2A that support a novel mechanism for molecular recognition of cGMP. Alanine mutations of Phe-438, Asp-439, and Thr-488, amino acids that interact with the pyrimidine ring, decrease cGMP affinity slightly but increase cAMP affinity by up to 8-fold. Each interaction is required to provide for cAMP/cGMP specificity. Mutations of any of the residues that interact with the phosphate-ribose moiety or the imidazole ring abolish cGMP binding. Thus, residues that interact with the pyrimidine ring collectively control cAMP/cGMP specificity, whereas residues that bind the phosphate-ribose moiety and imidazole ring are critical for high affinity binding. Similar decreases in binding were found for mutations made in a bacterially expressed GAF-A/B plus catalytic domain construct. Because these constructs had very high catalytic activity, it appears that these mutations did not cause a global denaturation. The affinities of cAMP and cGMP for wild-type GAF-B alone were approximately 4-fold greater than for the holoenzyme, suggesting that the presence of neighboring domains alters the conformation of GAF-B. More importantly, the PDE2A GAF-B, GAF-A/B, GAF-A/B+C domains, and holoenzyme all bind cGMP with much higher affinity than has previously been reported. This high affinity suggests that cGMP binding to PDE2 GAF-B activates the enzyme rapidly, stoichiometrically, and in an all or none fashion, rather than variably over a large range of cyclic nucleotide concentrations.

    View details for DOI 10.1074/jbc.M404287200

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223554600086

    View details for PubMedID 15210692

  • The two GAF domains in phosphodiesterase 2A have distinct roles in dimerization and in cGMP binding PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Martinez, S. E., Wu, A. Y., Glavas, N. A., Tang, X. B., Turley, S., Hol, W. G., Beavo, J. A. 2002; 99 (20): 13260-13265

    Abstract

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate all pathways that use cGMP or cAMP as a second messenger. Five of the 11 PDE families have regulatory segments containing GAF domains, 3 of which are known to bind cGMP. In PDE2 binding of cGMP to the GAF domain causes an activation of the catalytic activity by a mechanism that apparently is shared even in the adenylyl cyclase of Anabaena, an organism separated from mouse by 2 billion years of evolution. The 2.9-A crystal structure of the mouse PDE2A regulatory segment reported in this paper reveals that the GAF A domain functions as a dimerization locus. The GAF B domain shows a deeply buried cGMP displaying a new cGMP-binding motif and is the first atomic structure of a physiological cGMP receptor with bound cGMP. Moreover, this cGMP site is located well away from the region predicted by previous mutagenesis and structural genomic approaches.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.192374899

    View details for Web of Science ID 000178391700137

    View details for PubMedID 12271124

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC130621

  • Opposing effects of reactive oxygen species and cholesterol on endothelial nitric oxide synthase and endothelial cell caveolae CIRCULATION RESEARCH Peterson, T. E., Poppa, V., Ueba, H., Wu, A., Yan, C., Berk, B. C. 1999; 85 (1): 29-37

    Abstract

    Synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is critical for normal vascular homeostasis. eNOS function is rapidly regulated by agonists and blood flow and chronically by factors that regulate mRNA stability and gene transcription. Recently, localization of eNOS to specialized plasma membrane invaginations termed caveolae has been proposed to be required for maximal eNOS activity. Because caveolae are highly enriched in cholesterol, and hypercholesterolemia is associated with increased NO production, we first studied the effects of cholesterol loading on eNOS localization and NO production in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Caveolae-enriched fractions were prepared by OptiPrep gradient density centrifugation. Treatment of BAECs with 30 microgram/mL cholesterol for 24 hours stimulated significant increases in total eNOS protein expression (1.50-fold), eNOS associated with caveolae-enriched membranes (2.23-fold), and calcium ionophore-stimulated NO production (1.56-fold). Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemia, we next studied the effects of ROS on eNOS localization and caveolae number. Treatment of BAECs for 24 hours with 1 micromol/L LY83583, a superoxide-generating napthoquinolinedione, decreased caveolae number measured by electron microscopy and prevented the cholesterol-mediated increases in eNOS expression. In vitro exposure of caveolae-enriched membranes to ROS (xanthine plus xanthine oxidase) dissociated caveolin more readily than eNOS from the membranes. These results show that cholesterol treatment increases eNOS expression, whereas ROS treatment decreases eNOS expression and the association of eNOS with caveolin in caveolae-enriched membranes. Our data suggest that oxidative stress modulates endothelial function by regulating caveolae formation, eNOS expression, and eNOS-caveolin interactions.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000081424900006

    View details for PubMedID 10400908

  • Agonist induced homologous desensitization of mu-opioid receptors mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases is dependent on agonist efficacy MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY Kovoor, A., Celver, J. P., Wu, A., Chavkin, C. 1998; 54 (4): 704-711

    Abstract

    Using Xenopus laevis oocytes coexpressing mammalian mu-opioid receptors (MORs), beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 2 (beta-ARK2) [also called G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK3)], and beta-arrestin 2 (beta-arr 2), we compared the rates of beta-ARK2 (GRK3)- and beta-arr 2-mediated homologous receptor desensitization produced by treatment with opioid agonists of different efficacies. The response to MOR activation was measured using two-electrode voltage clamp as an increase in the conductance of the coexpressed G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (heteromultimer of KIR3.1 and KIR3.4) channels. Treatment with opioids of high efficacy, either [D-Ala2,N-MePhe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin, fentanyl, or sufentanyl, produced a GRK3- and beta-arr 2-dependent reduction in response in <20 min, whereas treatment with the partial agonist morphine produced receptor desensitization at a significantly slower rate. Because GRK3 requires activation and membrane targeting by free G protein betagamma subunits released after agonist-mediated activation of G proteins, a low efficacy agonist such as morphine may produce weak receptor desensitization as a consequence of poor GRK3 activation. To address this hypothesis, we substituted GRK5, a GRK that does not require activation by G protein betagamma. In oocytes expressing GRK5 instead of GRK3, both [D-Ala2,N-MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin and fentanyl, but not morphine, produced desensitization of MOR-activated potassium conductance. Thus, mu-opioid agonists produced significant receptor desensitization, mediated by either GRK3 or GRK5, at a rate dependent on agonist efficacy.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000076485500014

    View details for PubMedID 9765514