All Publications


  • Rapid assessment of changes in phage bioactivity using dynamic light scattering. PNAS nexus Dharmaraj, T., Kratochvil, M. J., Pourtois, J. D., Chen, Q., Hajfathalian, M., Hargil, A., Lin, Y. H., Evans, Z., Oromí-Bosch, A., Berry, J. D., McBride, R., Haddock, N. L., Holman, D. R., van Belleghem, J. D., Chang, T. H., Barr, J. J., Lavigne, R., Heilshorn, S. C., Blankenberg, F. G., Bollyky, P. L. 2023; 2 (12): pgad406

    Abstract

    Extensive efforts are underway to develop bacteriophages as therapies against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, these efforts are confounded by the instability of phage preparations and a lack of suitable tools to assess active phage concentrations over time. In this study, we use dynamic light scattering (DLS) to measure changes in phage physical state in response to environmental factors and time, finding that phages tend to decay and form aggregates and that the degree of aggregation can be used to predict phage bioactivity. We then use DLS to optimize phage storage conditions for phages from human clinical trials, predict bioactivity in 50-y-old archival stocks, and evaluate phage samples for use in a phage therapy/wound infection model. We also provide a web application (Phage-Estimator of Lytic Function) to facilitate DLS studies of phages. We conclude that DLS provides a rapid, convenient, and nondestructive tool for quality control of phage preparations in academic and commercial settings.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/pnasnexus/pgad406

    View details for PubMedID 38111822

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC10726995

  • Rapid assessment of changes in phage bioactivity using dynamic light scattering. bioRxiv : the preprint server for biology Dharmaraj, T., Kratochvil, M. J., Pourtois, J. D., Chen, Q., Hajfathalian, M., Hargil, A., Lin, Y. H., Evans, Z., Oromí-Bosch, A., Berry, J. D., McBride, R., Haddock, N. L., Holman, D. R., van Belleghem, J. D., Chang, T. H., Barr, J. J., Lavigne, R., Heilshorn, S. C., Blankenberg, F. G., Bollyky, P. L. 2023

    Abstract

    Extensive efforts are underway to develop bacteriophages as therapies against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, these efforts are confounded by the instability of phage preparations and a lack of suitable tools to assess active phage concentrations over time. Here, we use Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to measure changes in phage physical state in response to environmental factors and time, finding that phages tend to decay and form aggregates and that the degree of aggregation can be used to predict phage bioactivity. We then use DLS to optimize phage storage conditions for phages from human clinical trials, predict bioactivity in 50-year-old archival stocks, and evaluate phage samples for use in a phage therapy/wound infection model. We also provide a web-application (Phage-ELF) to facilitate DLS studies of phages. We conclude that DLS provides a rapid, convenient, and non-destructive tool for quality control of phage preparations in academic and commercial settings.

    View details for DOI 10.1101/2023.07.02.547396

    View details for PubMedID 37425882

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC10327207

  • The Environmental Impact of Orthopaedic Surgery. The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume Saleh, J. R., Mitchell, A., Kha, S. T., Outterson, R., Choi, A., Allen, L., Chang, T., Ladd, A. L., Goodman, S. B., Fox, P., Chou, L. 2022

    Abstract

    ➤: There are a growing number of opportunities within the field of orthopaedic surgery to address climate change and investigate ways to promote sustainability.➤: Orthopaedic surgeons can take a proactive role in addressing climate change and its impacts within the areas of operating-room waste, carbon emissions from transportation and implant manufacturing, anesthetic gases, and water usage.➤: Future studies are needed to further these initiatives on quantifying and decreasing environmental impact and furthering sustainable use of our resources.

    View details for DOI 10.2106/JBJS.22.00548

    View details for PubMedID 36574633