Stanford Advisors


All Publications


  • When Goal Pursuit Gets Hairy: A Longitudinal Goal Study Examining the Role of Controlled Motivation and Action Crises in Predicting Changes in Hair Cortisol, Perceived Stress, Health, and Depression Symptoms CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE Holding, A., Moore, E., Moore, A., Verner-Filion, J., Ouellet-Morin, I., Koestner, R. 2021
  • Outcomes for Implemented Macroeconomic Policy Responses and Multilateral Collaboration Strategies for Economic Recovery After a Crisis: A Rapid Scoping Review INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH SERVICES Embrett, M., Bielska, I. A., Manis, D. R., Cooper, R., Agarwal, G., Nartowski, R., Moore, E., Lopatina, E., Conway, A., Clark, K. 2021; 51 (3): 337-349

    Abstract

    To promote postpandemic recovery, many countries have adopted economic packages that include fiscal, monetary, and financial policy measures; however, the effects of these policies may not be known for several years or more. There is an opportunity for decision makers to learn from past policies that facilitated recovery from other disease outbreaks, crises, and natural disasters that have had a devastating effect on economies around the world. To support the development of the United Nations Research Roadmap for COVID-19 Recovery, this review examined and synthesized peer-reviewed studies and gray literature that focused on macroeconomic policy responses and multilateral coalition strategies from past pandemics and crises to provide a map of the existing evidence. We conducted a systematic search of academic and gray literature databases. After screening, we found 22 records that were eligible for this review. The evidence found demonstrates that macroeconomic and multilateral coalition strategies have various impacts on a diverse set of countries and populations. Although the studies were heterogeneous in nature, most did find positive results for macroeconomic intervention policies that addressed investments to strengthen health and social protection systems, specifically cash and unconventional/nonstandard monetary measures, in-kind transfers, social security financing, and measures geared toward certain population groups.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/00207314211007100

    View details for Web of Science ID 000637152500001

    View details for PubMedID 33819129

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC8193076

  • The Role of Goal-Related Autonomy: A Self-Determination Theory Analysis of Perfectionism, Poor Goal Progress, and Depressive Symptoms Moore, E., Holding, A. C., Moore, A., Levine, S. L., Powers, T. A., Zuroff, D. C., Koestner, R. AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC. 2021: 88-97

    Abstract

    Adopting a self-determination theory perspective, this 3-wave longitudinal study explores the role of perfectionism in goal pursuit and the experience of depressive symptoms. The findings highlight the role of goal-related autonomy in mediating the opposite effects of self-critical and personal standards perfectionism on goal progress and depressive symptoms over the course of an academic year. The results suggest a way of understanding the pathway to depressive symptoms and poor goal progress in perfectionists. They point to a number of implications for clinical practice when working with self-critical perfectionists. Specifically, they indicate that interventions aimed at promoting autonomous motivation, may not only bolster goal progress but also act as a protective factor against depressive symptoms. Together, the results indicate that autonomous motivation is central to goal progress and suggest that low goal-related autonomy can be linked to negative outcomes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

    View details for DOI 10.1037/cou0000438

    View details for Web of Science ID 000610919100008

    View details for PubMedID 32352824

  • Perfectionism and the pursuit of personal goals: A self-determination theory analysis MOTIVATION AND EMOTION Moore, E., Holding, A. C., Hope, N. H., Harvey, B., Powers, T. A., Zuroff, D., Koestner, R. 2018; 42 (1): 37-49
  • Assessing catastrophic thinking associated with debilitating mental health conditions DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION Moore, E., Adams, H., Ellis, T., Thibault, P., Sullivan, M. L. 2018; 40 (3): 317-322

    Abstract

    The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Symptom Catastrophizing Scale (SCS). The SCS items were drawn from the Pain Catastrophizing Scale but were modified to make them better suited to the context of debilitating mental health conditions that are not necessarily associated with pain. The number of items was reduced from 13 to 7, and the response scale was simplified.The SCS was administered to individuals diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) (N = 79) or with a chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) condition (N = 88).Exploratory factor analyzes revealed single factor solutions of the SCS for both the MSK and MDD samples. The internal consistency of the SCS was good. The SCS was significantly correlated with measures of pain severity, depressive symptom severity and disability in both samples. Individuals with MDD scored higher on the SCS than individuals with MSK. The SCS was shown to be sensitive to treatment-related reductions in catastrophic thinking.Preliminary analyzes suggest that the SCS is a reliable and valid measure of symptom-related catastrophic thinking associated with debilitating mental health conditions. Implications for Rehabilitation Although catastrophic thinking has been identified as a risk factor for disability, current assessment tools are not well suited for individuals with debilitating mental health conditions. This paper describes a brief assessment instrument that can be used to assess catastrophic thinking in individuals with debilitating mental health conditions. The results of this study suggest that targeting catastrophic thinking might yield reductions in symptom severity and disability in work-disabled individuals with major depressive disorder.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/09638288.2016.1254283

    View details for Web of Science ID 000415711900009

    View details for PubMedID 27866430

  • The Relation Between Catastrophizing and Occupational Disability in Individuals with Major Depression: Concurrent and Prospective Associations JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL REHABILITATION Adams, H., Thibault, P., Ellis, T., Moore, E., Sullivan, M. 2017; 27 (3): 405-412

    Abstract

    Background Catastrophic thinking has been associated with occupational disability in individuals with debilitating pain conditions. The relation between catastrophic thinking and occupational disability has not been previously examined in individuals with debilitating mental health conditions. The present study examined the relation between catastrophic thinking and occupational disability in individuals with major depression. Methods The study sample consisted of 80 work-disabled individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) who were referred to an occupational rehabilitation service. Participants completed measures of depressive symptom severity, catastrophic thinking and occupational disability at admission and termination of a rehabilitation intervention. Return-to-work outcomes were assessed 1 month following the termination of the rehabilitation intervention. Results Cross-sectional analyses of admission data revealed that catastrophic thinking contributed significant variance to the prediction of self-reported occupational disability, beyond the variance accounted for by depressive symptom severity. Prospective analyses revealed that reductions in catastrophic thinking predicted successful return to work following the rehabilitation intervention, beyond the variance accounted for by reductions in depressive symptom severity. Conclusions The findings suggest that catastrophic thinking is a determinant of occupational disability in individuals with major depressive disorder. The findings further suggest that interventions designed to reduce catastrophic thinking might promote occupational re-integration in individuals with debilitating mental health conditions.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10926-016-9669-7

    View details for Web of Science ID 000410199100010

    View details for PubMedID 27770242

  • Return to work helps maintain treatment gains in the rehabilitation of whiplash injury PAIN Sullivan, M., Adams, H., Thibault, P., Moore, E., Carriere, J. S., Lariviere, C. 2017; 158 (5): 980-987

    Abstract

    This study examined the relation between return to work and the maintenance of treatment gains made over the course of a rehabilitation intervention. The study sample consisted of 110 individuals who had sustained whiplash injuries in rear collision motor vehicle accidents and were work-disabled at the time of enrolment in the study. Participants completed pre- and post-treatment measures of pain severity, disability, cervical range of motion, depression, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and catastrophizing. Pain severity was assessed again at 1-year follow-up. At 1-year follow-up, 73 participants had returned to work and 37 remained work-disabled. Analyses revealed that participants who returned to work were more likely to maintain treatment gains (77.5%) than participants who remained work-disabled (48%), χ = 6.3, P < 0.01. The results of a regression analysis revealed that the relation between return to work and the maintenance of treatment gains remained significant (β = 0.30, P < 0.01), even when controlling for potential confounders such as pain severity, restricted range of motion, depression, and pain catastrophizing. The Discussion addresses the processes by which prolonged work-disability might contribute to the failure to maintain treatment gains. Important knowledge gaps still remain concerning the individual, workplace, and system variables that might play a role in whether or not the gains made in the rehabilitation of whiplash injury are maintained. Clinical implications of the findings are also addressed.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000871

    View details for Web of Science ID 000402430600024

    View details for PubMedID 28178073

  • Catastrophizing and pain-related fear predict failure to maintain treatment gains following participation in a pain rehabilitation program PAIN REPORTS Moore, E., Thibault, P., Adams, H., Sullivan, M. L. 2016; 1 (2): e567

    Abstract

    The present study explored whether pain-related psychosocial risk factors played a role in determining whether treatment gains were maintained following participation in a rehabilitation intervention for musculoskeletal injury. The study sample consisted of 310 individuals (163 women, 147 men) with work-related musculoskeletal conditions who were enrolled in a physical rehabilitation program. Measures of pain severity, pain catastrophizing and pain-related fear were completed at the time of admission and at the time of discharge. Pain severity was assessed again at 1-year postdischarge. Participants were classified as "recovered" if they showed a decrease in pain of at least 2 points and rated their pain at discharge as less than 4/10. Recovered participants were considered to have failed to maintain treatment gains if their pain ratings increased by at least 2 points from discharge assessment to 1-year follow-up, and they rated their pain as 4/10 or greater at 1-year follow-up. The results of a logistic regression revealed that participants with high posttreatment scores on measures of catastrophizing and fear of pain were at increased risk of failing to maintain treatment gains. The findings suggest that unless end-of-treatment scores on catastrophizing and fear of pain fall below the risk range, treatment-related reductions in pain severity may not be maintained in the long term. The clinical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PR9.0000000000000567

    View details for Web of Science ID 000660623300001

    View details for PubMedID 29392192

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5741354