Academic Appointments


  • Social Science Research Scholar, Center on Food Security and Environment at FSI

All Publications


  • Do Resources Matter? Effects of an In-Class Library Project on Student Independent Reading Habits in Primary Schools in Rural China READING RESEARCH QUARTERLY Yi, H., Mo, D., Wang, H., Gao, Q., Shi, Y., Wu, P., Abbey, C., Rozelle, S. 2019; 54 (3): 383–411

    View details for DOI 10.1002/rrq.238

    View details for Web of Science ID 000472951500007

  • The cost-effectiveness of alternative vision screening models among preschool children in rural China ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA Wang, L., Congdon, N., Hogg, R. E., Zhang, S., Li, M., Shi, Y., Jin, L., He, F., Wang, H., Boswell, M., Iyer, M. 2019; 97 (3): E419–E425

    View details for DOI 10.1111/aos.13954

    View details for Web of Science ID 000465095200027

  • Impact of various types of near work and time spent outdoors at different times of day on visual acuity and refractive error among Chinese school-going children PLOS ONE Guan, H., Yu, N., Wang, H., Boswell, M., Shi, Y., Rozelle, S., Congdon, N. 2019; 14 (4)
  • Impact of various types of near work and time spent outdoors at different times of day on visual acuity and refractive error among Chinese school-going children. PloS one Guan, H., Yu, N. N., Wang, H., Boswell, M., Shi, Y., Rozelle, S., Congdon, N. 2019; 14 (4): e0215827

    Abstract

    Various types of near work have been suggested to promote the incidence and progression of myopia, while outdoor activity appears to prevent or retard myopia. However, there is a lack of consensus on how to interpret these results and translate them into effective intervention strategies. This study examined the association between visual acuity and time allocated to various activities among school-going children.Population-based survey of 19,934 students in grade 4 and 5 from 252 randomly selected rural primary schools in Northwest China in September 2012. This survey measured visual acuity and collected self-reported data on time spent outdoors and time spent doing various types of near activities.Prolonged (>60 minutes/day) computer usage (-0.025 LogMAR units, P = .011) and smartphone usage (-0.041 LogMAR units, P = .001) were significantly associated with greater refractive error, while television viewing and after-school study were not. For time spent outdoors, only time around midday was significantly associated with better uncorrected visual acuity. Compared to children who reported no midday time outdoors, those who spent time outdoors at midday for 31-60 minutes or more than 60 minutes had better uncorrected visual acuity by 0.016 LogMAR units (P = .014) and 0.016 units (P = .042), respectively.Use of smart phones and computers were associated with declines in children's vision, while television viewing was not. Statistically significant associations between outdoor time at midday and reduced myopia may support the hypothesis that light intensity plays a role in the protective effects of outdoor time.

    View details for PubMedID 31026279

  • The Effect of Providing Free Eyeglasses on Children's Mental Health Outcomes in China: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial. International journal of environmental research and public health Guan, H., Wang, H., Du, K., Zhao, J., Boswell, M., Shi, Y., Qian, Y. 2018; 15 (12)

    Abstract

    If children with common vision problems receive and use eyeglasses, their educational performance rises. Without proper treatment, visually impaired children may not achieve educational gains and could suffer from poor mental health. We use a randomized controlled trial to study the impact of an eyeglasses promotion program in rural China on the mental health of myopic primary school students. Three measures of mental health are used: learning anxiety, physical anxiety, and scores on the Mental Health Test (MHT). Our empirical analysis showed that on average, the treatment has small and insignificant for learning anxiety and MHT, and a small but significant reduction in physical anxiety. However, subgroup analysis reveals that myopic students who study more intensively see their learning anxiety and physical anxiety reduced after being provided with eyeglasses. In contrast, students with the lower study intensity suffer a rise in learning anxiety after receiving eyeglasses. A potential mechanism for the differing impacts is the increase in teasing reported among low study-intensity students that does not occur for high study-intensity students. Care should be taken to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of in-school vision programs.

    View details for PubMedID 30563118

  • The Effect of Providing Free Eyeglasses on Children's Mental Health Outcomes in China: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH Guan, H., Wang, H., Du, K., Zhao, J., Boswell, M., Shi, Y., Qian, Y. 2018; 15 (12)
  • Can reading programs improve reading skills and academic performance in rural China? CHINA ECONOMIC REVIEW Gao, Q., Wang, H., Mo, D., Shi, Y., Kenny, K., Rozelle, S. 2018; 52: 111–25
  • The cost-effectiveness of alternative vision screening models among preschool children in rural China. Acta ophthalmologica Wang, L., Congdon, N., Hogg, R. E., Zhang, S., Li, M., Shi, Y., Jin, L., He, F., Wang, H., Boswell, M., Iyer, M. 2018

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: To explore the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of three vision screening models among preschool children in rural China.METHODS: Vision screening was carried out among children aged 4-5years in 65 preschools in two counties in Northwest China, using Crowded Single Lea Symbols to test visual acuity. Children were assigned randomly by school to one of three screening models: screening by teachers (15 schools, 1835 children), local optometrists (30 schools, 1718 children) or volunteers (20 schools, 2183 children). Children identifying ≥2 symbols incorrectly in either eye failed screening. Accuracy of screening was compared with screenings executed by experienced optometrists among 141 children selected randomly from the three screening models. Direct and indirect costs for each model were assessed. Costs to detect a true case failed screening were estimated.RESULTS: The sensitivity for three models ranged from 76.9% to 87.5%, specificity from 84.9% to 86.7% and standardized positive predictive value from 83.7% to 85.7%. None differed significantly between models. The costs per case detected were $37.53, $59.14 and $52.19 for the teachers, local optometrists and volunteers. In producing the cost estimates for teacher screening and local optometrist screening models, we used a salary payment that was identical for both models (with the salary being equal to that of the optometrist). The teacher screening model was the most cost-effective.CONCLUSION: Accuracy of screening by teachers, local optometrists and volunteers was the same in this setting, but the use of teachers was most cost-effective, reducing the cost per case detected by almost 40%.

    View details for PubMedID 30345728

  • Health Seeking Behavior among Rural Left-Behind Children: Evidence from Shaanxi and Gansu Provinces in China INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH Guan, H., Wang, H., Huang, J., Du, K., Zhao, J., Boswell, M., Shi, Y., Iyer, M., Rozelle, S. 2018; 15 (5)

    Abstract

    More than 60 million children in rural China are “left-behind”—both parents live and work far from their rural homes and leave their children behind. This paper explores differences in how left-behind and non-left-behind children seek health remediation in China’s vast but understudied rural areas. This study examines this question in the context of a program to provide vision health care to myopic rural students. The data come from a randomized controlled trial of 13,100 students in Gansu and Shaanxi provinces in China. The results show that without a subsidy, uptake of health care services is low, even if individuals are provided with evidence of a potential problem (an eyeglasses prescription). Uptake rises two to three times when this information is paired with a subsidy voucher redeemable for a free pair of prescription eyeglasses. In fact, left-behind children who receive an eyeglasses voucher are not only more likely to redeem it, but also more likely to use the eyeglasses both in the short term and long term. In other words, in terms of uptake of care and compliance with treatment, the voucher program benefitted left-behind students more than non-left-behind students. The results provide a scientific understanding of differential impacts for guiding effective implementation of health policy to all groups in need in developing countries.

    View details for PubMedID 29710797

  • Assessing college critical thinking: preliminary results from the Chinese HEIghten (R) Critical Thinking assessment HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Liu, O., Shaw, A., Gu, L., Li, G., Hu, S., Yu, N., Ma, L., Xu, C., Guo, F., Su, Q., Kardanovaj, E., Chirikov, I., Shi, J., Shi, Z., Wang, H., Loyalka, P. 2018; 37 (5): 999–1014
  • Can Social-Emotional Learning Reduce School Dropout in Developing Countries? JOURNAL OF POLICY ANALYSIS AND MANAGEMENT Wang, H., Chu, J., Loyalka, P., Xin, T., Shi, Y., Qu, Q., Yang, C. 2016; 35 (4): 818-?

    View details for DOI 10.1002/pam.21915

    View details for Web of Science ID 000383668300005

  • Developing instruments to assess and compare the quality of engineering education: the case of China and Russia ASSESSMENT & EVALUATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION Kardanova, E., Loyalka, P., Chirikov, I., Liu, L., Li, G., Wang, H., Enchikova, E., Shi, H., Johnson, N. 2016; 41 (5): 770-786
  • Survey using incognito standardized patients shows poor quality care in China's rural clinics. Health policy and planning Sylvia, S., Shi, Y., Xue, H., Tian, X., Wang, H., Liu, Q., Medina, A., Rozelle, S. 2015; 30 (3): 322-333

    Abstract

    Over the past decade, China has implemented reforms designed to expand access to health care in rural areas. Little objective evidence exists, however, on the quality of that care. This study reports results from a standardized patient study designed to assess the quality of care delivered by village clinicians in rural China. To measure quality, we recruited individuals from the local community to serve as undercover patients and trained them to present consistent symptoms of two common illnesses (dysentery and angina). Based on 82 covert interactions between the standardized patients and local clinicians, we find that the quality of care is low as measured by adherence to clinical checklists and the rates of correct diagnoses and treatments. Further analysis suggests that quality is most strongly correlated with provider qualifications. Our results highlight the need for policy action to address the low quality of care delivered by grassroots providers.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/heapol/czu014

    View details for PubMedID 24653216

  • Mental health and dropout behavior: A cross-sectional study of junior high students in northwest rural China INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Huan, W., Yang, C., Fei, H., Shi Yaojiang, Y. J., Qu, Q., Rozelle, S., Chu, J. 2015; 41: 1-12
  • The Han-Minority Achievement Gap, Language, and Returns to Schools in Rural China ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURAL CHANGE Yang, Y., Wang, H., Zhang, L., Sylvia, S., Luo, R., Shi, Y., Wang, W., Rozelle, S. 2015; 63 (2): 319-359

    View details for DOI 10.1086/679070

    View details for Web of Science ID 000346349600004

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4307025

  • The Han-Minority Achievement Gap, Language, and Returns to Schools in Rural China. Economic development and cultural change Yang, Y., Wang, H., Zhang, L., Sylvia, S., Luo, R., Shi, Y., Wang, W., Rozelle, S. 2015; 63 (2): 319–59

    View details for PubMedID 25635143

  • Dormitory management and boarding students in China's rural primary schools CHINA AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC REVIEW Yue, A., Shi, Y., Chang, F., Yang, C., Wang, H., Yi, H., Luo, R., Liu, C., Zhang, L., Chu, J. Y., Rozelle, S. 2014; 6 (3): 523-550